Name: Mr Hilton Year Group: 6 Unit



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Literacy Unit Plan St. Peter’s CE JIN School



Name: Mr Hilton

Year Group: 6
Unit:

Narrative unit 4

Short stories with flashbacks (3wks)


Term:

Spring


(1st half term)
Week beginning:

25/01/10


02/01/10

09/02/10


Resources:

The Piano by Aidan Gibbons.

The Hajj by Vince Cross.


Prior learning:

Form opinions and personal responses to text, using evidence from a written or visual text to support and justify responses.

Infer authors' perspectives and understand underlying themes.

Use and manipulate paragraphs to structure and shape a narrative.




Groups:

Red – Leola, Amber, Chloe H, Jonathan, Alex.

Green – Helena, Ellie, Jade, Amy G.

Blue – Josh, Harry, Amie H, Chloe C, Nathan.

Yellow – John, Jacob, Sam, Billi-Jo.


SEN:

Statements – None

SA+ - John Fort, Amber Midwood

SA – Helena Butterworth, Chloe C, Amie Humphreys, Billi-Jo Rogers, Sam Watson.







Day

Objectives

Whole class work


Guided group tasks

Differentiated independent tasks

Plenary focus

1

2 Listening and responding

Make notes when listening for a sustained period and discuss how note-taking varies depending on context and purpose.



7 Understanding and interpreting texts

Understand how writers use different structures to create coherence and impact.

Understand underlying themes, causes and points of view.


Using the IWB Watch the short film The Piano by Aidan Gibbons a number of times. Encourage children to discuss their personal responses to the film while watching. Watch the film again to identify what they consider to be the underlying themes of the narrative. Use the pause to freeze individual frames and pens to annotate evidence of the suggested themes. For example, circle evidence related to the central character's sense of loss or regret in the visual text portrayed by his body language. Revisit the audio by obscuring the visual to focus attention on the role of the music in the narrative. Play the audio to the children a number of times. Encourage discussion of the central character's mood and how this is conveyed to the reader through the music.

(VA)

To support their own writing, they are going to identify and collect techniques from the film that show that a flashback has taken place. Watch the film and identify how the author maintains cohesion across the text as the main character moves from the present to the past through flashbacks. Divide children into groups to watch the film. Give each group to focus on the way in which the following features are used to indicate shifts in time and place: gesture (the direction of the central character's gaze - looking to the side, looking upwards) pan of the camera (upwards, to the side) editing (screen fading to black and merge of images) costume (clothing changes to indicate different periods of time).

(VA)





Using the IWB annotate the graph to identify the pace of the music during each section of the text, for example the rapid pace of the music while the young boy plays on the hobby horse.

(VA)



2

6 Word structure and spelling

Use a range of appropriate strategies to edit, proofread and correct spelling in own work, on paper and on screen.







Guided reading
All groups to work in 20minute slots with DD.




Review answers to questions highlighting in the text where to find key vocabulary.
(VA)

3.

2 Listening and responding

Make notes when listening for a sustained period and discuss how note-taking varies depending on context and purpose.



7 Understanding and interpreting texts

Understand how writers use different structures to create coherence and impact.

Understand underlying themes, causes and points of view.


Using the IWB read Hajj Extract 1. Discuss the impact of the opening, how the narrator is feeling, and pick out the dramatic descriptions of the nightmare.
Establish that the story is in the past tense, first person, and that the author is using flashback to tell the story.
Ask the children what the Virginia (a boat) is, what they think may have happened and who the characters are. Encourage them to use evidence from the text.

Recap on the opening of the story. Draw a character web, establishing what we already know about the characters. Establish the mood of the story so far (tense, awkward, guilty). Picking out evidence from the text, show how the author creates the mood (through character’s thoughts, actions, short sentences, vocabulary).

(VA)


Ask the children to discuss in groups who they think the narrator is, how old he is, and how he feels about events. Share some ideas with the class.
Groups should work to devise questions they would like to ask the narrator/main character.
Share some of the questions devised. As a class, try to answer them, using evidence from the text.
Establish how many characters there are in the story.
(VA)

In response partners, ask children to discuss their views of the characters. Share ideas and record them on the IWB.
Read the second extract of the story, as a class.

Ask children to think again, with their partner, about their views of the main character and then share ideas as a class.


(VA)

Draw an emotion graph of the story. Use the boy’s feelings towards the events to construct the graph.
(VA)

4.

1 Speaking

Use a range of oral techniques to present persuasive arguments and engaging narratives.



7 Understanding and interpreting texts

Understand underlying themes, causes and points of view.



Using the IWB re-read the story Hajj, focusing on the characters.

Discuss what we have learned about them: the main character/narrator, Gary, Robbie, Evelyn Levy, the narrator’s father.

What do we know about the relationships between them? Collect evidence about each character by highlighting the text (a different colour for each character).

Prompt the children to identify that some of the story is written in the past tense and some in the present tense, and that the author is using the technique of flashback. Analyse the text to see how the author demonstrates the passing of time. Highlight the time connectives in the story and the shifts between past and present tense verbs.

Draw a graph or timeline to show the time structure of the story, noting how this is demonstrated.

(VA)


In groups, ask children to prepare questions for all of the characters. Prompt the children to ask the characters why they act in the way they do, how they feel about situations in the story or events in the past, what they would like to be different.
Hot-seat some children in the roles of the characters.
(VAK)


Give the children paragraphs from the story and ask them to change them from past to present tense, or vice versa.
Remind them that they may need to add or delete words or change the word order so that the paragraph makes sense.
Some children could write a short passage of their own which includes shifts between the past and present tense.

Red – Present to past tense

Green – Past to present tense (DD)

Blue – Present to past tense

Yellow – Past to present tense (GH)
(VAK)


Draw an emotion graph for one of the other characters in the story (for example, Evelyn Levy), asking the children to imagine how life was for him before the war, during Dunkirk, after the war.
Discuss the effect of using flashback. Does it add to the mood of the story? What is the impact of writing the story in the first person? How would the story be different if it were written from the point of view of one of the other boys?

(VA)


5.

BIG WRITING LESSON


Write a persuasive argument as a head teacher to parents in favour of healthy school lunches.

6.

9 Creating and shaping texts

Integrate words, images and sounds imaginatively for different purposes.


10 Text structure and organisation

Use varied structures to shape and organise texts coherently.




Ask children to reflect on the story Hajj. Ask them to consider the themes of the story, and generate a list. These may include relationships between generations, loss, trauma, misunderstanding, reconciliation, forgiveness, war.

What did they like/dislike about the story?

What do they think the author’s message was? Was there a message or is it just a story?
Explain to the children that they are going to plan a narrative piece, based on the story Hajj, from the viewpoint of the narrator.

Listen to the piece of music Aquarium by Saint Saens; discuss the mood of the music. Discuss how the story could be structured to fit the structure of the music. http://www.last.fm/music/Camille+Saint-Sa%C3%ABns/_/Aquarium


(VA)


Guided reading
All groups to work in 20minute slots with DD
(VA)

Children to devise their own paragraph planner covering the key events in the story, (‘Paragraph planner’).

The children should consider eight paragraphs covering:



  • The recurring dream

  • Visiting the canal

  • Flashback to the boys teasing the old man

  • Flashback to the boys boarding Virginia

  • Flashback to untying boat/drowning

  • Boys swearing to keep the secret

  • Newspaper report ‘War hero drowns’

  • Narrator’s plan to join the army.

Ask them to make notes of ideas for each paragraph.

Red –

Green – (DD)

Blue –

Yellow – (GH)


(VAK)


Discuss and share the children’s ideas, recording their suggestions on
the board.
(VA)

7.

9 Creating and shaping texts

Integrate words, images and sounds imaginatively for different purposes.



10 Text structure and organisation

Use varied structures to shape and organise texts coherently.




Model how to organise the memories and events into a linked sequence (this could be chronological or use shifts in time).

Model mapping the paragraphs to phases in the music. Listen to the music with the class and agree which phrases of the music will fit with each paragraph.

Discuss how to indicate flashback – for example, by the use of conditionals, or through a visual technique such as colour.
(VA)


Hand out copies of David’s new watch. Tell the class that each group has a different extract from the story but all of them have no punctuation. They must add in the missing punctuation.

Yellow – (DD)




Ask the children to complete their paragraph plans, linking paragraphs to phases in the music. Remind the children that the narrative is to be written from the narrator’s point of view.
Red –

Green –


Blue –

Yellow – (DD)


(K)


Share ideas and review plans. How are the children planning to convey mood, flashback and narrative viewpoint?
(VA)

8.

9 Creating and shaping texts

Integrate words, images and sounds imaginatively for different purposes.

10 Text structure and organisation

Use varied structures to shape and organise texts coherently.




Using the paragraph planner, decide how many sentences each paragraph will need in order to convey the ideas and fit the time constraints of the music. Model writing the first paragraph of the narrative from the planner, indicating the passing of time and the mood of the memory.

Model the use of tense, time conditionals, complex sentences and concise language.

Once written, read the paragraph through to the musical phrase assigned to it, checking that it fits.
(VA)





Children should begin their own narrative independently. They should be reminded to use time conditionals, phrases that convey mood and precise language to tell the story. Use response partners to offer feedback on the effectiveness of the sentences written.
Red –

Green –


Blue – (GH)

Yellow – (DD)


(K)


Ask children to look at their sentences alongside their paragraph planner and identify a sentence they are having difficulty with to bring to a ‘sentence surgery’ in the next lesson – for example, a sentence where they have not been able to capture all the important aspects of the scene or have not been able to convey the mood.
(VA)

9.

9 Creating and shaping texts

Integrate words, images and sounds imaginatively for different purposes.



10 Text structure and organisation

Use varied structures to shape and organise texts coherently.



As a class, look at the sentences brought by the children to the ‘sentence surgery’. Support the children to improve their sentences to ensure maximum impact on the reader, encourage other children to offer advice.

Continue to use shared and supported composition to transfer the ideas from the planner into a narrative, make reference to the music to ensure the sections fit appropriately.

With the children, create a checklist of features needed for the stories.

Go through the checklist of features with the children. Discuss any problems they may have with their narratives. Share ideas on how to convey shifts in time, collect effective vocabulary and phrases which convey mood and recap on the use of complex sentences.

(VA)





Children should continue to write their narratives independently, using response partners to offer feedback on their use of sentences. They should be reminded to use time conditionals, phrases that convey mood and precise language to tell the story.
Red –

Green –


Blue – (GH)

Yellow – (DD)


(AK)

Provide time for peer evaluation of finished narratives against checklist of features. Compare the narratives written with the original story.
(VA)






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