Name: Mr Hilton Year Group: 6 Unit



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Literacy Unit Plan St. Peter’s CE JIN School



Name: Mr Hilton

Year Group: 6
Unit:

Narrative unit 2

Extending narrative (2wks)


Term:

Autumn


(1st half term)
Week beginning:

09/11/09


16/11/09


Resources:

Barrow quest multi-step story.


Blank story map.


Prior learning:

Check that children can already: Identify and discuss the various features of a fiction text, including characters, settings, themes and dilemmas, the author's intentions, the structure and organisation of the text and the way language is used to create effects on the reader. Discuss their responses to a range of fictional or imaginative texts they have read, on paper and on screen. Know how various communication modes, for example visual images, video, sounds, can be used alongside or in combination with words to tell a story. Know how to navigate an interactive non-linear (ICT) text. Use a range of approaches and learning strategies, for example role-play, dialogue and experimental writing, to extend and explore their understanding of and response to a work of fiction.



Groups:

Red – Leola, Amber, Chloe H, Jonathan, Alex.

Green – Helena, Ellie, Jade, Amy G.

Blue – Josh, Harry, Amie H, Chloe C, Nathan.

Yellow – John, Jacob, Sam, Billi-Jo.

SEN:

Statements – None

SA+ - John Fort, Amber Midwood

SA – Helena Butterworth, Chloe C, Amie Humphreys, Billi-Jo Rogers, Sam Watson.







Day

Objectives

Whole class work

Guided group tasks

Differentiated independent tasks

Plenary focus

1



2008 Literacy SAT paper

Reading SAT

(45mins)


2

1 Speaking

Use the techniques of dialogic talk to explore ideas, topics or issues.



4 Drama

Improvise using a range of drama strategies and conventions to explore themes such as hopes, fears, desires.



8 Engaging with and responding to texts

Sustain engagement with longer texts, using different techniques to make the text come alive.


Read the opening chapter of Barrowquest.

Note devices used by author to engage reader, introduce the hero and the situation.

Establish that this is a quest adventure story: Lin has been chosen by his tribe to find the magician in order to save his people.

Ask the children for other quest stories they know of – King Arthur, Lord of the Rings, Greek myths.

Explain that this is a ‘multiple choice text’, it has different reading pathways. Show the children that at the end of chapter one, the reader can choose whether to go North, South, East or West.

(VA)





Tell the children they are going to imagine that they are Lin, the hero of the story, and that they are going to improvise his actions and movements.

Provide the narration for the story while the children act it out. Begin with Lin being told he had to embark on the quest, entering the barrow and choosing between the stone passageways, and continue working through one of the chapters. Remind the children that Lin is a reluctant hero. At various intervals freeze-frame and ask the children in role about their fears, hopes, thoughts and physical feelings at that point in the story.

Return to the text; vote on which reading pathway to take next. Read the next section, displaying the text, noting the devices used to engage the reader and language features.
(VAK)


Discuss possible ideas for the challenge Lin could face in the next chapter. Encourage the children to think about the sort of challenges and puzzles encountered by quest heroes.
Using the Barrowquest story map complete the summary of events for each chapter so far.
(VAK)

3

6 Word structure and spelling

Use a range of appropriate strategies to edit, proofread and correct spelling in own work, on paper and on screen.



8 Engaging with and responding to texts

Sustain engagement with longer texts, using different techniques to make the text come alive.


As a class, choose the next chapter to read. Analyse the language and organisational features of the text – setting, magical elements, hero, dangers and puzzles encountered, how the author uses complex and short sentences for effect, building of tension, language choices (adverbs, verbs and so on), character’s thoughts and feelings, clues about the quest.

At the next reading pathway choice, allow children to choose their own pathway and give out copies of the text.






Children read chosen pathways independently or in small groups with an adult. Give the children the worksheet , ‘Identifying language and organisational features of Barrowquest’, to complete while reading.

Discuss the different endings to the quest adventure.

Complete the story map which you have been filling in.

Review the structure of a quest story – reason for quest, journey, the dangers encountered, successful resolution. Note how each chapter contains a ‘mini quest’.

Ask the children to give examples of the language and organisational features found during their independent work.




4

1 Speaking

Use the techniques of dialogic talk to explore ideas, topics or issues.



8 Engaging with and responding to texts

Sustain engagement with longer texts, using different techniques to make the text come alive.



Tell children they are going to write a class quest adventure story.

Create a checklist of what makes a successful quest story:

1. Object/person to be searched for.

2. Elements of magic.

3. Stock characters (such as knights, magicians or trolls).

4. Tasks


5. Obstacles

6. Harsh mythical land.

7. Successful resolution.
Remind class of Barrow quest story and see if their list matches the quest.
Take possible ideas for a quest plot.
(VA)





Organise the children into four groups. Each group should draw a section of a map of a mythical land, for example North, South, East and West.

Add in physical features such as volcanoes, a dragon’s den, underground caves, rivers, rope bridges and mythical, fearsome creatures.

(Alternatively, the map of a mythical land could be provided for the children to explore and add to.)
DD to support Blue group.

CG to support yellow group.


(VA)


Ask each group to explain their part of the land to the rest of the class. Encourage questions. Show children a selection of objects or people (cup, lamp, map, treasure chest and so on) and ask them to vote as a class as to which object or person their quest will be for.
(VA)


5

Conrad Burdekin lesson

6

9 Creating and shaping texts

Use different narrative techniques to engage and entertain the reader.

Select words and language drawing on their knowledge of literary features and formal and informal writing.

Integrate words, images and sounds imaginatively for different purposes.



In pairs, ask the children to discuss the purpose of the quest – to save people, to free a prisoner, to appease an evil ruler. Invite pairs to feed back ideas to the class, decide which one to use for the class story.

Remind children of the Barrowquest story map, and give them a copy of ‘Blank story map’.

Model writing the opening chapter of the class story establishing the setting, the purpose of the quest and introducing the character(s).

Model using the techniques identified in Phase 1 to engage the reader.

End the chapter with four reading pathways.

Involve the children through shared composition using individual whiteboards.

(VA)

Divide the children into groups of four. Explain that they are going to continue the class quest story, each writing a different pathway. Allow time for the groups to discuss what will happen in each pathway and what their finishing point for chapter 2 will be (for example, the hero finds himself with four doors to choose from, four roads, four tunnels).
(VAK)


Children work independently, writing their versions of chapter 2, the start of the journey. Encourage them to use the language and organisational features identified in Barrowquest (build up of suspense, vivid descriptions, character’s thoughts and feelings). Remind children of quest story features.
DD to support Blue group.

GH to support yellow group.


(VA)


Children re-form into their groups and share their progress so far, swapping chapters and ensuring that they all finish at the same point. There is an opportunity for peer assessment here.
(VA)

7

9 Creating and shaping texts

Use different narrative techniques to engage and entertain the reader.

Select words and language drawing on their knowledge of literary features and formal and informal writing.

Integrate words, images and sounds imaginatively for different purposes.


Show one child’s version of chapter 2 on the IWB to read as a class, highlighting the use of language and organisational features.

At the end of the chapter, establish that the reader now has another choice of pathway. (Children should have decided on these pathways in the previous lesson.) Tell the children that the next chapter should involve the hero encountering a hostile creature and defeating it.

Model writing the start of a version of chapter 3 on the IWB.

(VA)


In groups, children decide on four different encounters for chapter 3 (such as a dragon, a troll, giant ants and a bear). The groups should decide on the finishing point and their next four choices (for example, the finding of a magic object, playing an instrument, solving a riddle).


Children should work independently, writing their versions of chapter 3.
GH to support Blue group.

DD to support yellow group.


(VA)

Children to read stories so far. Rest of class to offer feedback.

(A)


8

11 Sentence structure and punctuation

Express subtle distinctions of meaning, including hypothesis, speculation and supposition, by constructing sentences in varied ways.

Use punctuation to clarify meaning in complex sentences.


Recap on the story structure by referring to the story map constructed in Phase 1. Remind children of the setting they created with their map and discuss where the hero could go next, what obstacles they might encounter on the way, any difficult terrain. Collect ideas.

Establish that in chapter 4 the hero must overcome another obstacle. Model writing a version of chapter 4, incorporating the language and organisational features of quest stories.

Model the construction of complex sentences and effective use of punctuation.

Ask the groups to decide on the next four pathways and the finishing point for the chapter.

(A)


Children should work independently, writing their versions of chapter 3+4.
GH to support Blue group.

DD to support yellow group.


(VA)

In groups, share progress so far. Check that their story is fitting into the story map, that there is continuity in the story and that all chapters are finishing
at the same point.
(VA)

9

10 Text structure and organisation

Use varied structures to shape and organise texts coherently.



11 Sentence structure and punctuation

Use punctuation to clarify meaning in complex sentences.



Explain that chapter 5 is the final chapter of the story. This chapter must involve the hero finding the treasure (either the object or person). It may involve them confronting a guardian or the final danger and the significance of the treasure will be revealed. It should also involve the hero returning home and an explanation of what happens there, thus resolving the story. Discuss possible endings for their quest stories.


Allow groups to evaluate their progress and to decide what they still need to achieve.
(A)


Children should work independently, writing their versions of chapter 5.
GH to support Blue group.

DD to support yellow group.


(VA)

Check stories against agreed success criteria.

(VA)


10

Big writing




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