Navigating Nonfiction in Expository Text Session: 1 (p. 2) Lesson



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Session: 1 (p. 2) Lesson: Readying Our Minds to Read Nonfiction

Getting Ready- Do Before

  • Copies of non-fiction texts (one copy per partnership—at their level) to use during active engagement

  • Copies from Bugwise (see CD-ROM) or another non-fiction text to use during modeling

  • Baskets of nonfiction texts at student levels




Anchor Charts

Ways Nonfiction Readers Read with Power Chart

p. 15





Connection

Readers we have become such great fiction readers. We have learned many different strategies to help grow our thinking and to help us read with power. Today, we will begin to learn how to read non-fiction books with power. We all know that we read fiction a certain way, and we read non-fiction a certain way. In our new unit, we will come to know how non-fiction readers read different things in different ways.

Teaching Point:

Rev up our minds to read nonfiction


“Although great nonfiction readers are very different, one from another, today I want to teach you that every great nonfiction reader reads with energy, with power. One way that nonfiction readers do this is that we rev up our minds for reading.” Imagine you have your hands on a motorcycle, with one hand on each of the handle bars and those handlebars control the engine. You rev up the engine by turning the handlebars and beneath you the motorcycle starts bucking. It’s ready to take off. Today, that is what we will do, we will rev up our minds just like a motorcycle to take off reading with power.



Modeling/Teaching:

Let me show you how I can rev up my mind to help me read with power.

  • Read the “Ways Nonfiction Readers Read with Power” chart.

-We rev up our minds before reading. Read text features (titles, subtitles, photos, captions, charts) and think, “What will this text probably say?”

-Think, “What do I already know about the topic? And build expectations from that.

-Then we read with power, pausing to ask, “Does this match my expectations?”


  • Model using the chart to rev up your mind. Using a non-fiction text (Bugwise is suggested), model how you read the title, read over the table of contents, and skim through the headings, pictures, captions, graphs, and charts- talking aloud about what you already know about the topic. As you think aloud, answer what you think the text will probably say about the topic and what your expectations are for the book.

Active Engagement

Now, I would like for you to try to rev up your minds so that you can read with power.

  • Re-read over the chart

-We rev up our minds before reading. Read text features (titles, subtitles, photos, captions, charts) and think, “What will this text probably say?”

-Think, “What do I already know about the topic? And build expectations from that.

-Then we read with power, pausing to ask, “Does this match my expectations?”


  • Have students rev up their minds using their partnership texts and then share their thinking with a partner.

  • Share one partnerships thinking with the class.

Link:


Today, you can browse through the baskets of books at your table. Choose books that interest you. But, today and every day, before you begin reading, make sure that you rev up your mind before you read, so that you can read with power. Look at the text features and ask yourself, “What will this text probably say? What do I already know about this topic? What are my expectations for this book? Does this book match my expectations?”

Mid-Workshop


Stop readers and point out two or three different nonfiction text features and explain how the types of nonfiction text features can change your predictions about what you will learn from the text. (example on p.16)

Share:

Partnerships will share with other partnerships their preview of their text. This is called “text buzzing.” Students may start with such words as, “I think this book is mostly about...,” “This section is mostly about...” (example on p. 20)

** Note ** Make sure to have plenty of expository nonfiction about a variety of topics. Most of the first seven lessons will revolve around this type of nonfiction.

Session: 2 (p. 30) Lesson: Looking for Structure Within a Nonfiction Text

Getting Ready- Do Before

  1. Partnerships need to bring a piece of nonfiction text to mini-lesson

  2. Nonfiction read-aloud text


Anchor Charts

Ways Nonfiction Readers Read with Power Chart




Connection:

Relate a time when you read a nonfiction text and by the end you had so many jumbled facts in your head that you didn’t know what you had read. Tell students that non-fiction readers read with a pencil- real or imagined- making main ideas and supports visible. (example on p. 33)

Teaching Point:

Readers often chunk texts, pausing at the ends of chunks, to summarize what we’ve read



Readers, today I want to teach you how non-fiction readers use imaginary pencils to help us pay attention to the main ideas. When we come to the end of a chunk of text- or when our mind is brimful-we pause and say, “What did I just read?” Then we come up with little summaries about the stuff that we read.

Modeling/Teaching:


Let me model how I can pause and summarize what I have read to help me read with power.

  • Model reading a text and pausing when your mind is brimful “full” and asking “What did I just read?” Then, summarize (Use your hand to think about the main idea. Point to the palm of your hand, enumerate supporting details on each of your fingers) and continue on.

Active Engagement

Now I would like for you to try this strategy with a partner. Begin to read your book to your partner. As you read, pay attention to the details. When your mind seems to be full with information, stop, and using your hand summarize what you have read to your partner. Then, let your partner try this strategy, stop, and summarize a section to you.


  • After the partnerships have finished, share one partnerships summary with the group.

Link:

So readers, today and for the rest of your lives, remember to read non-fiction with power. One way to do this is to stop when your mind feels brimful, or full, and using your hand as a prop, summarize what you have learned.

Mid-Workshop

  • Remind the students of the strategy from the mini-lesson. Have students draw hands in their reader’s notebooks and write down, “So what did this section teach me?” p. 41

Share:

  • Have partners meet and talk about what they think the main ideas and supporting details are in their books. P. 46

Session: 3 (p. 48) Lesson: Choosing Just-Right Texts and Reading with Stamina, in Nonfiction

Getting Ready- Do Before

  • Copies of non-fiction texts (one copy per partnership)

  • Nonfiction read-aloud text







Anchor Charts

Readers Read with Power Chart

-from yesterday’s lesson

Just-Right Chart (p. 53)

Reading Long and Strong (p. 55)



Connection:


“Readers, we have accumulated many strategies to help us read fiction. Some of the lists of strategies that we used for fiction can be used to help us read non-fiction. Just like readers pause from time to time to accumulate all that we’ve read, so, too, learners need to pause from time to time to put our arms around all we’ve learned. When we learn new stuff, we can draw on everything we’ve learned to help us carry on. It’s like the new tools get added to our existing tool kit.”

Teaching Point:

Using lists to remember what we have learned, choosing just-right texts, and reading with stamina




“Today, I would like to teach you how we can draw upon what we learned. One way to do this is to use lists to help us transfer strategies from one unit into the next. So today, I want to teach you how to use lists to help us read non-fiction books with power.”


Modeling/Teaching:

“We made it a goal in fiction to read stronger and longer earlier in the year. Reading longer and stronger not only helps us get more reading done, it helps us hold on to the text. We learned though, that in order to read with power and stamina, we must be reading just-right texts. The same is true for nonfiction. We need to try our nonfiction books on for size, just like we did with fiction books.
Let me show you how I can draw upon what I learned about choosing just- right books in fiction to help me choose just right books in non-fiction. I can use my list from our other unit to help me carry the information to this unit.”

  • Read the chart aloud
  • Model reading a non-fiction book with ease and with difficulty and showing the difference between a book that is too hard and one that is just-right.


Active Engagement

“Now I would like for you to try and use another list that we learned previously in the year. Another important skill that we learned was to read with volume and stamina. Let’s look at the list, ‘Reading Long and Strong.’ We talked about reading quickly and that is important. This chart makes me remember that at the start of the year, we also worked with reading volume.”

  • Read the list to the class

  • Have students practice using the techniques with non-fiction as they read to their partners.

  • Share how a partnership used the list to help them read with volume.

Link:

“So readers, today and every day, keep in mind that you are the author of your reading life. One way to make sure you are authoring the best possible reading life is to think, “Am I remembering to draw on stuff I learned in other units, other years, other places, that still pertains to what I am doing today?” And while you are in this class, remember to use lists and charts as a way to remind yourself of things you learned earlier. Remember, in particular, that choosing just-right books and reading those with speed and stamina will help you become really smart non-fiction readers.”

  • Add this to your Reading with Power chart.




Mid-Workshop

Readers pause to teach others what we are learning and we talk from our outlines. Remind readers that when we converse and share, we don’t just read our notes, we elaborate on them. Make note of a child you conferred with who did this with you. P. 58


Share:


Remind students to only include the big ideas in their boxes and bullets, but to elaborate on those when discussing with their partners. P. 63


Session: 4 (p. 66) Lesson: Becoming Experts and Teaching Others from Nonfiction Texts

Getting Ready- Do Before

  • Copies of non-fiction texts (one copy per partnership)

  • Nonfiction read-aloud

  • Photographs and illustrations from the read-aloud

  • Copies of a page of a nonfiction text for each partnership




Anchor Charts

Before I Can Teach, I…

(example on page 77) to be used during Modeling




Connection:


Readers we have been learning how to read non-fiction with power! Many of you have not only been reading with power but you have become experts on the topics that you are reading.

  • Give an example of a student who has become very knowledgeable on a topic that they have been reading about. (example on page 68)

Teaching Point:

Becoming experts so that we can teach others what we know



“Today I want to teach you that when people read nonfiction books on a topic, we become experts on that topic, teaching others what we know. To teach someone, you need to know the main ideas and the supporting details, and it helps to use an explaining voice and sometimes even to use your face, hands, and whole body to illustrate what you mean.”

Modeling/Teaching:

Let me model how to read in a way that it helps me become an expert. Then, I’ll model how I might teach others about what I know. Remember how we learned to read looking for the main ideas (point to your palm) and supporting details (point to your fingers). Well, as I read, I will make sure to think about those ideas and details. Then, I will try to share what I learned in a way that makes this information interesting.


  • Read over “Before I can Teach, I…” chart.

  • Model reading a section of a non-fiction text.

  • Then, model sharing the books information with the students using intonation, facial and hand gestures.

  • Point out what you did to make your “teaching” interesting for others.

Example on pages 69-72

Active Engagement

“Now it is your turn to try to read like experts. As you read, think about the main idea and supporting details. Then, as you share with your partner, remember you will be the teacher. Make sure to use an explaining voice and gestures. If there are pictures, point to them as you explain what you learned.

  • Have each partner read a portion and share what they learned.
  • Share some of the gestures and techniques that you noticed students using with the class.


Link:

“Readers today you learned that readers of nonfiction books become experts who can teach others what we are learning. As you read your independent books today and every day, keep in mind, you aren’t just reading yourselves; you are also reading for others. You get to become the teacher and make this information exciting for others to learn.”

Mid-Workshop


Remind students to let pictures inform them of more details. Discuss how readers study pictures carefully to see what they notice and to help them squeeze information and ideas out of everything that they find.

p. 76-77


Share:

Ask the class to help a reader get ready to teach his/her partner from his/her nonfiction text. The partner will exit the room while the class coaches the other partner. Invite the partner back in for the demonstration teaching. p. 80-81


Session: 5 (p. 82) Lesson: Grasping Main Ideas in Nonfiction Texts




Getting Ready- Do Before

  • Copies (one per partnership) of The Weird and Wonderful Octopus from the CD-ROM or another nonfiction article at students reading level
  • Large collection of objects or pictures of objects that can be sorted into groupings/ or a chart that lists objects then another chart that lists these objects into groupings. (To be used during connection)


  • Chart paper for share time







Anchor Charts

Just-Right Chart

Connection:


  • Tell students that it is easier to remember things when you have organized them into categories.

  • Share a story when you had trouble remembering details but then when you put those details into categories, it made it easier for you to remember those details.

Example on page 85







Teaching Point:

Sorting information into categories



“Today, I want to teach you how readers of expository text organize what they are learning. Instead of trying to memorize all the information, it helps to create larger categories and to organize that information. That way, as we read, we sort the little bits of information under bigger points, creating a boxes-and-bullets outline that matches the text. “




Modeling/Teaching:

“Let me show you how I categorize the information as I read. I know that non-fiction readers read and gather in what the text is saying. Then, when their minds feel brimful, they stop and ask themselves what they read. But now, I am going to take this a step further. As my mind seems brimful, I will stop and look back and ask myself these questions:

‘What were the main categories of things that I learned about’

‘Is there a teaching point that pops out of this passage that seems especially big here?’

‘Can I sort what I have learned into piles’”


  • Demonstrate while reading a portion of The Weird and Wonderful Octopus --extracting the main idea and using a boxes and bullets outline to include the subordinate information. (example on page 89)




Active Engagement

“Now I would like for you to try to categorize information as you read non-fiction. Remember that you can ask yourselves, ‘What were the main categories of things that I learned about,’ ‘Is there a teaching point that pops out of this passage that seems especially big here?’ and

‘Can I sort what I have learned into piles?’”




  • Have students read a section from the same article and find key words to locate the main idea and supporting details. Have partners turn and tell each other their boxes and bullets.

  • Share one partnership’s conversation with the class.







Link:

“So today and everyday readers, remember that you can organize expository information by locating those pop-out sentences that reveal the main ideas and supporting details. Then you can use a boxes and bullets outline to help you organize that information. Organizing is important, but hard work.”




Mid-Workshop

Remind readers to read differently when they are anticipating teaching others. Tell them that later today the students will teach their partner about the text. They will need to talk up the main ideas to make them important to the person they are teaching. Make sure the students have some examples, details, or bullets that fit under the box/main idea, to prepare for their teaching. P. 94





Share:


Ask readers to teach each other about their texts. Ask readers to process teaching of each other, collecting hints about how to improve. If time, have students share suggestions and help create a chart, “Helpful Hints for Teaching Others About a Topic.” P. 98





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