New York City section 283102 protected premises fire alarm/emergency communication system



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SECTION 283102
PROTECTED PREMISES FIRE ALARM/EMERGENCY COMMUNICATION SYSTEM

THIS SECTION SHOULD BE USED FOR BUILDINGS MORE THAN 70 FEET IN HEIGHT WHICH ARE REQUIRED TO HAVE A NEW YORK STATE UNIFORM FIRE PREVENTION AND BUILDING CODE COORDINATED FIRE SAFETY SYSTEM (NYSUFP&BC 774.9), UTILIZING EMERGENCY VOICE COMMUNICATIONS AND SEVERAL ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS (NYSUFP&BC 1061.1) IN ADDITION TO FIRE AND SMOKE DETECTING FUNCTIONS.
FOR NEW YORK CITY CODE GUIDANCE, CALL THE NYC DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS (212) 312-8100.
THIS SECTION COVERS A SYSTEM WHICH HAS A MICROPROCESSOR BASED FIRE COMMAND STATION (FCS) HAVING FIRE ALARM, SECURITY, CONTROL, AND REAL TIME CAPABILITIES. INITIATING AND CONTROL DEVICES ARE HARD WIRED OR MULTIPLEXED TO INTERCONNECTED CONTROL UNITS (ICU’S). ICU’s ARE MULTIPLEXED TO THE FIRE COMMAND STATION.
IN ADDITION TO THE NYSUFP&BC, THIS SECTION WAS WRITTEN TO MEET:

1. FOR THE BUILDING: NFPA 72 CHAPTER 3 PROTECTED PREMISES FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS.

2. FOR MULTIPLE BUILDINGS (IN CONJUNCTION WITH SECTION 283103): NFPA 72 5-3 PROPRIETARY SUPERVISING STATION SYSTEMS.

3. FOR ALARM RETRANSMISSION TO THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, EITHER:

a. NFPA 72 5-4 REMOTE SUPERVISING STATION FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS WHEN SYSTEM IS CONNECTED TO REMOTE STATION.

b. NFPA 72 6-16 AUXILIARY FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS, WHEN SYSTEM IS CONNECTED TO MUNICIPAL FIRE ALARM SYSTEM.

4. FOR VOICE COMMUNICATION: NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.3 AND 3-8.4.1.3.5.


5. THE ESSENCE OF ALL THE ADDITIONAL CODES, STANDARDS AND REFERENCES LISTED UNDER INFORMATION AT END OF SECTION. HOWEVER, YOU MUST EVALUATE THE CODES AND STANDARDS FOR REQUIREMENTS WHICH ARE RELEVANT TO ONLY SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS SUCH AS HOSPITALS, OTHER HEALTH AND MENTAL CARE FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES, INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS, DAY CARE AREAS, RETAIL SALES AREAS, STORAGE FACILITIES, HAZARDOUS AREAS, ETC. AND MODIFY THIS SECTION TO ACCOMMODATE THEIR SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS.
SEE INFORMATION AT END OF SECTION.

PART 1 GENERAL
1.01 RELATED WORK SPECIFIED ELSEWHERE
A. Video Training Programs: Section 017900.

INCLUDE SECTION 283103 WHEN SECTION 283102 IS PART OF A PROPRIETARY FIRE ALARM SYSTEM (NFPA 72 5-3).

B. Proprietary Fire Alarm System: Section 283103.



SECTION 271525 IS REQUIRED FOR OGS PROJECTS. CONFLICT: NYC DOES NOT ALLOW USE OF OPTICAL FIBER CABLES.

C. Optical Fiber Cables: Section 271525.


1.02 REFERENCES
A. Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
IN PARAGRAPH BELOW ADD “ and 13” FOR SPRINKLER SYSTEM ALARM AND SUPERVISION. ADD “and 20” FOR FIRE PUMP SUPERVISION.

B. National Fire Protection Association Standard 72.


C. Building Code of the City of New York.
1.03 DEFINITIONS

A. Initiating Device Circuit: A circuit to which automatic or manual initiating devices are connected where the signal received does not identify the individual device operated. Example:

1. Circuits from ICUs to non-addressable signal initiating devices.

B. Notification Appliance Circuit: A circuit or path directly connected to a notification appliance. Example:

1. Circuits from ICUs to notification appliances.


C. Signaling Line Circuit: A circuit or path between any combination of circuit interfaces, control units, or transmitters over which multiple system input signals or output signals, or both are carried. Examples:

1. Circuits from FCS to ICUs.

2. Circuits from ICUs to ICUs.

3 Circuits from ICUs to addressable devices.

4 Floor communication station telephones.
D. Operating Mode:

1. Private Mode:

a. Audible and visible signaling only to those persons directly concerned with the implementation and direction of emergency action initiation and procedure in the area protected by the fire alarm system, and:

b. Audible and visible signaling only to those persons within special designated areas where private mode operation is specified to be applicable.

2. Public Mode: Audible and visible signaling to occupants or inhabitants of the area protected by the fire alarm system.
1.04 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
A. The system operates as an integrated multiplexed protected premises fire alarm/emergency communication monitoring and control system.

1. Changes in the status of monitored points are indicated at the microprocessor based fire command station (FCS) utilizing distributed processing, peer-to-peer networked, interconnected control unit’s (ICU’s) located throughout the building.



1. SHOW LOCATION OF FCS AND ICU’S.

2. SHOW PRINTER (120 V AC FAN FOLD STYLE) ADJACENT TO FCS.

3. SHOW CRT (WITH KEYBOARD) ADJACENT TO FCS.

4. SHOW EMERGENCY LIGHTING AT FCS.


5. REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.3.3 AND 3-8.4.1.3.5.5 FOR REQUIREMENTS FOR LOCATING FCS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT.

6. SHOW A SMOKE DETECTING DEVICE IN EACH AREA WHERE FIRE ALARM CONTROL PANELS ARE INSTALLED AND THE AREA IS NOT CONTINUOUSLY OCCUPIED (NFPA 72 1-5.6).

a. The network micro-processors continually monitor the communications and data processing cycles of the system.

1) A communications failure indication (print-out, display and audible alarm) occurs at the FCS upon failure of the network communication and data processing cycle.

b. Upon FCS failure, an audible and visual alarm alerts attendant.

1) Complete failure of the FCS does not interfere with the ability of each ICU to perform its functions.

2. Smoke detectors and smoke sensors operate in conjunction with the systems’ alarm verification program.


IN AREAS WHERE ALARM VERIFICATION FEATURE IS DESIRED FOR ADDITIONAL PROTECTION AGAINST FALSE ALARMS OR UNWARRANTED DISCHARGE OF FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS, ALARM VERIFICATION ZONES FOR SMOKE DETECTORS, OR INDIVIDUAL SMOKE SENSORS OPERATING IN VERIFICATION MODE MUST BE INDICATED ON THE DRAWINGS. REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.3.2.3.1.

a. The alarm verification operation is selectable by zone for smoke detectors and by individual devices for smoke sensors.

b. The activation of any smoke detector within its zone initiates the alarm verification program.

1) The panel resets the activated detector and waits for a second alarm activation. If within one minute a second alarm is reported from any detector within the zone, the system alarms. If no second alarm within one minute, the system resumes normal operation.

c. The system can display the number of times (tally) a smoke detector zone or smoke sensor has gone into a verification mode. A trouble condition occurs when the tally reaches a pre-programmed number.

3. Smoke sensors act as intelligent and addressable devices. The smoke sensor converts the condition of it’s smoke sensing chamber to an analog value. This analog value is digitized and transmitted to the ICUs and FCS.

a. Actual smoke density and temperature measurements are referenced from average sample measurements and are compared to programmable values of threshold sensitivity.

b. Sensor “dirty” and “excessively dirty” trouble conditions are reported automatically through a maintenance advisory and alert program procedure.

c. The system continuously performs an automatic self-test routine on each sensor which checks sensor electronics to ensure the accuracy of the values being transmitted to the ICUs. Sensors that fail are identified and indicate a trouble condition.

d. System automatically performs NFPA 72 sensor sensitivity testing by:

1) Frequent routine individual sensor alarm simulation testing.

2) Trouble signal when sensor is outside its acceptable sensitivity range.

4. System individually identifies each addressable initiating device and other addressable monitor functions using multiplexing techniques.

5. System is capable of individually operating each alarm notification appliance, and other control functions, using multiplexing techniques.

6. Alarms are processed by the system at 3 levels of priority:

a. Fire alarms, supervisory and trouble signals take precedence in that respective order of priority, over all other signals.

b. Other alarms that require interaction by the attendant have the second level of priority.

c. Monitored points which do not require interaction by the attendant are the third level of priority.

7. Alarms, supervisory signals, and trouble signals are distinctively and descriptively annunciated.

a. Fire alarm signals are distinctive in sound from other signals, and this sound is not used for any other purpose.

b. Supervisory signals are distinctive in sound from other signals.

1) System differentiates between supervisory device activation and trouble (wiring faults) on independent supervisory service initiating circuits.

c. Trouble signals are indicated by distinctive audible signals. Exception: The same sound may be used for both supervisory signal and trouble signal if distinction is made between signals by visible annunciation.

8. Switches for silencing audible trouble and supervisory signals transfers the audible signal to an identified lamp or other visible indicator adjacent to the switches. The visible indication persists until the condition has been corrected. The audible signal sounds when the switch is in its silence position and no trouble or supervisory condition exists.

a. Trouble silencing switch does not prevent sounding of supervisory signal. Subsequent supervisory signals from other zones causes the supervisory signal to resound. A switch left in the silence position where there is no supervisory off-normal signal operates a visible signal silence indicator and causes the trouble signal to sound until the switch is returned to normal.

b. A silenced audible trouble signal resounds at programmable time intervals (every 24 hours or less) as a reminder that the trouble condition has not been corrected. Re-sounded signal is retransmitted to all locations required of the original trouble signal.

9. All system visual and audible trouble signals and supervisory signals and visible indication of their restoration is indicated at the FCS.

a. Each ICUs visual and audible trouble signals and supervisory signals and visible indication of their restoration is indicated at the ICU.

b. Monitoring of ground fault conditions indicate a ground fault trouble condition at the FCS.

10. Access to the system functions are controlled thru at least 3 levels of access security to prevent program modifications or use by unauthorized personnel:

a. At the lowest level of access the system automatically receives, displays and prints alarms, and performs control-by-event life safety functions. The attendant has minimum access to the system functions:

1) Alarm acknowledge.

2) Print alarm summary.

3) Silence alarms.

4) Perform other basic system functions that require interaction by the attendant (cannot change program parameters).

b. At mid-level of access, the attendant may change user programmable parameters and print all summaries.

c. At the highest level of access, programs may be modified by the system manager (life safety control-by-event programs may be field or factory modified).

d. System access functions (log on, log off, access level authority) are displayed and printed with date, time, and persons name.

11. Additional information may be added to the basic messages required to be printed and displayed for each monitor and control point. Using appropriate programming procedures, the system manager may add up to 5 lines (70 characters/line) of specific instructions and pertinent information to each monitor and control point.

12. Summary reports are displayed and printed at the FCS upon appropriate keyboard or function command. Active control points are identified by an assigned message. Spare control points are identified by a point number. The summary reports can be interrupted and terminated and the system returned to normal operation by a manual reset control or automatically if the system senses a change of status signal. The summary reports include:

a. Current Alarm, Trouble, and Supervisory Conditions: Lists all points not in normal state (print and display).

b. Alarm historical log report.

c. Trouble and supervisory historical log report.

d. All Points: Lists every point in the system and current status of the point (print only, display not required).

e. Control by Event Programs: Lists data for event initiated programs (print only, display not required).

f. Control by Time Programs: Lists data for time initiated programs (print only, display not required).

g. Diagnostics:

1) Alarm verification cycles initiated by a smoke detector zone or individual smoke sensors.

2) Smoke sensor service report: Device number, device type, custom label, presently selected alarm set point information, present average value, present value, peak observed values, service status.

3) Smoke sensor status report: Device number, device type, custom label, present sensitivity in % for smoke sensors and in degrees for temperature sensors, present status, and sensor range (normal, almost dirty, dirty).

4) Location of a wiring faults.

5) Devices which fail automatic tests.

6) Walk test reports.

13. Life safety control-by-event functions are retained in a non-volatile programmable memory and are not alterable through normal operation of the FCS by the attendant.

a. The life safety control-by-event control points may be manually operated at any time by the attendant thru appropriate keyboard commands.


IF SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS USED, SHOW SCHEDULE ON DRAWING FOR EACH RA/CC INDICATING NUMBER OF SPECIFIC PRE-PROGRAMMED SWITCHES REQUIRED. COORDINATE WITH RA/CC REQUIREMENTS IN PART 2.

b. Dedicated switches in the remote annunciator/control centers (RA/CC’s) allow personnel to manually operate specific pre-programmed life safety control-by-event control points.

c. Life safety control-by-event functions are printed and displayed at the FCS.

14. User programmable control-by-event functions may be programmed thru appropriate keyboard commands to automatically activate any user programmable control point upon a status change from any programmable monitor point.

a. The user programmable control-by-event control points may be manually operated at any time by the attendant thru appropriate keyboard commands.

IF SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS USED, DETERMINE IF EACH PRE-PROGRAMMED POINT NEEDS TO HAVE A DEDICATED SWITCH. IF NOT, MODIFY SUBPARAGRAPH AND SHOW RA/CC SCHEDULES ON THE DRAWINGS. COORDINATE WITH RA/CC REQUIREMENTS IN PART 2.

b. Dedicated switches in the RA/CC’s allows personnel to manually operate each pre-programmed user programmable control-by-event control point.

c. Assigned messages, date and time are printed and displayed at the FCS for the control points activated by the user programmable control-by-event function.

d. User programmable control-by-event functions which do not require an alarm or supervisory interaction are not attendant acknowledged.


TOUCHSCREEN AND MOUSE SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW ARE REQUIRED FOR OGS PROJECTS.

15. Touchscreen and mouse commands:

a. Personnel having the proper system level of access may program and modify all system functions and parameters thru use of touchscreen commands, and mouse “point and click” commands in addition to keyboard commands.

b. Life safety control-by-event control points, user programmable control-by-event functions, and user programmable automatic time initiated functions in addition to keyboard commands, may also be operated manually thru touchscreen commands and mouse “point and click” commands.

c. Summary reports, in addition to keyboard commands, may also be displayed and printed thru touchscreen commands and mouse “point and click” commands.

THE TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW ARE REQUIRED FOR OGS PROJECTS, BUT THEY ARE EXAMPLES FROM A PROJECT AND MUST BE VERIFIED WITH OGS FOR EACH APPLICATION.

16. OGS Direct Digital Control System Interconnection: The status of each system initiating device, monitored point, and life safety control-by-event function is transmitted thru an EIA RS-232C port via an Ethernet LAN using the ASHRAE BACnet protocol (or through a protocol sharing arrangement) that controls and operates the building HVAC equipment. The Direct Digital Control System to be installed in the future may be manufactured by one of the following companies:

a. Johnson Controls, Inc.

b. Landis Division, Siemens Building Technologies.

c. Trane, Inc.

17. An attendant at a remote IBM compatible personal computer may dial in over a telephone line to access the system data. The attendant has minimum access to the following system summary reports:

a. Standby battery and UPS condition summary.

b. Alarm summary.

c. Supervisory signal summary.

d. Trouble condition summary.

e. Control-by-event summary.

18. One person may test the system (walk test).

a. When in testing mode:

1) Alarm activation of an initiating device circuit is silently logged as an alarm condition in the historical data file. The system automatically resets after logging each alarm.

2) The momentary disconnection of an initiating device or notification appliance circuit is silently logged as a trouble condition in the historical data file. The system automatically resets after logging each trouble condition.

3) The person testing the system may also choose to have the system activate the alarm notification appliances for a maximum of two seconds upon initiating device testing and a maximum of four seconds upon trouble condition testing.

4) If in the test mode for an inappropriate (programmable) amount of time, the system automatically reverts to normal mode.

5) The municipal or remote station connection is bypassed.

6) The system shows a trouble condition.

7) Control relay functions are bypassed.

b. Testing groups allow portions of the system to be placed in test mode while the non-test groups remain in normal mode.


INCLUDE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW WHEN THERE ARE MULTIPLE FCS’S.

19. The primary FCS in control is identified by a visible indication at that FCS. Visible indicators at the other FCS(s) inform attendant(s) that manual system operation has been established by the FCS in use.

a. Other locations for which control is possible, such as voice communication modules in lobbies or assembly areas, have access request button with deny access indication to allow attendant at the primary FCS to maintain system control.
B. The FCS activates immediately and performs its alarm functions upon receipt of system alarm condition thru actuation of automatic or manual initiating devices:

1. The FCS sounds its audible alarm and illuminates its system alarm lamp or flashing display.

a. The audible alarm pulses until the system acknowledge button is depressed.

b. The system alarm lamp remains illuminated until the alarm condition has been corrected and the system reset.



REFER TO NFPA 72 1-5.7.3 FOR ALARM ANNUNCIATION REQUIREMENTS.

2. The FCS displays the point and type of alarm condition on the CRT/keyboard. Addressable devices are individually identified. Groups of non-addressable devices are identified by zones.


SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS REQUIRED BY NYC BUILDING CODE RS 17-3A 9.(n).

a. The display monitors the following systems in order of listed priority:

1) Manual fire alarm.

2) Smoke detection.

3) Sprinkler water flow.

4) Elevator lobby detector.

5) Notification appliance activation.

6) Fire department notification.

7) Fan system on-fan system off.

8) Fail safe locked door.

9) Fire systems trouble.

10) Notification appliance trouble.

11) Tamper switch alarm.

12) Power source.

13) Test/normal mode.

14) Remainder of system functions (any order).


FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW, REFER TO NYC BUILDING CODE RS 17-3A 11.(a).

b. FCS alarm information is presented in a direct manner, no reference to numeric code is permitted.



OMIT SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IF REMOTE CRT’S ARE NOT REQUIRED.

c. Duplicate information is also displayed on remote CRT’s.

3. The FCS prints the assigned message with date and time on the fan fold style printer for the point in alarm. Assigned messages, date and time are also printed for the control-by-event functions activated by the point in alarm.

INCLUDE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW FOR PROJECTS IN NYC, OCCUPANCY GROUP E. INDICATE ON THE DRAWINGS WHERE SIGNS ARE LOCATED. REFER TO NYC BUILDING CODE RS 17-3A 9.(n) AND 11.(g).

4. A flashing fire sign at the FCS and in building lobby illuminates, drawing attention to the alarm condition. Signs remain illuminated for duration of alarm condition.



CHECK WITH CLIENT AGENCY IF FIRE DEPARTMENT IS TO BE CALLED, OR IF OTHER PROCEDURES ARE REQUIRED (SIGNAL MUST BE TRANSMITTED TO FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR B4, C6.2 AND C6.3 OCCUPANCY). REFER TO NYSUFP&BC 1060.2(a)(4).
IF FIRE COMPANY IS TO BE CALLED, SPECIFY METHOD REQUIRED BY THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. MODIFY SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW TO SUIT.
REFERENCES FOR CONNECTION TO FIRE DEPARTMENTS THROUGH MUNICIPAL FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS, PUBLIC FIRE ALARM REPORTING SYSTEMS OR OTHER TYPE SUPERVISING STATIONS ARE:

1. SUPERVISING STATION FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS: NFPA 72 CHAPTER 5.

2. PUBLIC FIRE ALARM REPORTING SYSTEMS: NFPA 72 CHAPTER 6.

3. The fire department is automatically called.


SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS AN EXAMPLE FOR AUXILIARY TYPE OPERATION (LOCAL ENERGY, SHUNT, OR PARALLEL TELEPHONE). INDICATE WHERE THE SIGNAL IS TO BE SENT.

a. The FCS activates a relay through the municipal connection and transmits the alarm condition to (________).



OMIT SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW FOR SHUNT TYPE OPERATION OR PARALLEL TELEPHONE MUNICIPAL SYSTEMS WHERE THE LINES ARE SUPERVISED FROM THE MUNICIPAL STATION.

1) Supervision of wiring between FCS and relay indicates trouble conditions at the FCS.



FIVE SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW ARE AN EXAMPLE OF CONNECTION TO AN EXISTING MUNICIPAL SYSTEM.

b. The FCS activates an existing master box municipal connection and transmits the alarm condition to ADT. Unless otherwise directed, the following separate conditions are transmitted to ADT:

1) Manual Alarm: Activation of any manual fire alarm pull station.

2) Sprinkler Alarm: Activation of any sprinkler water flow device.

3) Smoke Alarm: Activation of any automatic initiating device (i.e. smoke sensors, heat sensor, etc.)

4) Trouble Alarm: Activation of any trouble condition in the system.



SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS AN EXAMPLE FOR REMOTE STATION TYPE OPERATION. INDICATE WHERE SIGNAL IS TO BE SENT. CHANGE LEASED LINES TO OTHER TYPE CONNECTION IF REQUIRED.

c. The FCS transmits the alarm condition to remote station (_______) via leased lines.



OMIT SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW WHEN THE LEASED LINES ARE SUPERVISED FROM THE REMOTE STATION. IF A DACT IS USED, MODIFY ALL PARAMETERS TO SUIT (REFER TO NFPA 72 5-5.3.2)

1) Supervision of wiring between FCS and remote station indicates trouble conditions at the FCS.


SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS AN EXAMPLE OF THE BUILDING FIRE ALARM SYSTEM TRANSMITTING TROUBLE CONDITIONS TO A SUPERVISING STATION (A FACILITY THAT RECEIVES SIGNALS AND AT WHICH PERSONNEL ARE IN ATTENDANCE AT ALL TIMES TO RESPOND TO THESE SIGNALS). INDICATE NAME OF SUPERVISING STATION (FIRE DEPARTMENT, CENTRAL STATION SERVICE OR OTHER FACILITY MEETING CRITERIA OF SUPERVISING STATION).


REFER TO NFPA 3-8.4.4.2.

d. Trouble conditions received at the protected premises control unit (FCS), including loss of primary or secondary power are also transmitted to the supervising station (_________). Relays or modules providing transmission of trouble conditions to the supervising station are arranged to provide fail-safe operation.



IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW CHANGE “FIRE DEPARTMENT” TO “CENTRAL STATION OPERATING COMPANY” OR OTHER APPROPRIATE TERMINOLOGY.

e. For system test, a switch in the FCS enables attendant to prevent a signal transmission through the municipal connection. When disconnected, a system trouble condition is indicated, also, a separate lamp illuminates indicating the disconnected mode.

6. The attendant at the FCS presses the acknowledge button which silences its audible alarm and causes a print-out and CRT display of the assigned message for the point in alarm with date, time and an acknowledge prefix.

a. A printing suppression program eliminates superfluous system alarm acknowledge messages. Only alarm acknowledge messages that are essential to the attendant for system operation are printed.



SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS REQUIRED BY NYSUFP&BC 1060.2( a)(4) FOR GROUP B4, C6.2 and 6.3 OCCUPANCY.

7. A procedure sign at the FCS instructs personnel on procedure to be followed in the event of a fire.



IF A POSITIVE ALARM SEQUENCE ALARM OR A PRESIGNAL FEATURE IS PREFERRED, MODIFY LIFE SAFETY CONTROL-BY-EVENT FUNCTIONS BELOW TO SUIT OPERATION. REFER TO NFPA 72 1-5.4.11, NFPA 101 7-6.3.2 AND NYSUFP&BC 1060.2( a)(6). THERE ARE MANY OCCUPANCIES LISTED IN NFPA 101 WHERE EITHER POSITIVE ALARM SEQUENCE OR PRESIGNAL OR BOTH ARE PROHIBITED.

SHOW WHERE AUDIBLE NOTIFICATION APPLIANCES ARE REQUIRED. REFER TO NFPA 72 CHAPTER 4, NYSUFP&BC 1060.2( C), AND ANSI A117.1. SHOW SUFFICIENT NUMBER OF AUDIBLE APPLIANCES SO THAT, WHEN TESTED, THE SYSTEM WILL MEET THE SPECIFIED PRIVATE AND PUBLIC MODE SOUND LEVEL PARAMETERS.

SHOW NOTIFICATION APPLIANCE WIRING RUN TO AN ICU FROM EACH AREA WHERE ALARM IS TO BE SOUNDED (FLOOR BY FLOOR, AREA BY AREA, ETC). COORDINATE WIRING WITH FUNCTION SPECIFIED. REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.1, 3-8.4.1.3, 3-8.4.1.3.5.6, 3-8.4.1.3.6.

C. Life Safety Control-By-Event Functions: The FCS and ICU’s immediately perform life safety control-by-event functions upon system alarm condition:



INDICATE WHERE BUILDING MANAGER ALARM ANNUNCIATORS ARE REQUIRED. REFER TO NYSUFP&BC 791.2, 1060.2(4) & (5), 1061.2(e).

1. Building manager alarm annunciators are activated in fire command room, supervisor’s office, and mechanical equipment rooms, drawing attention to the alarm condition.

2. Private mode audible signals sound, having a sound level of not less than 45 dBA at 10 Feet, nor more than 120 dBA at the minimum hearing distance from the audible appliance. Also, the audible signal has a sound level at least 10 dBA above the average ambient sound level or 5 dBA above the maximum sound level having a duration of at least 60 seconds, whichever is greater, measured 5 feet above the floor in the occupiable area.

a. 45 dBA private mode audible signals sound in:



EDIT LIST BELOW. WHERE OCCUPANTS ARE INCAPABLE OF EVACUATING THEMSELVES BECAUSE OF AGE, PHYSICAL OR MENTAL DISABILITIES, OR PHYSICAL RESTRAINT, ALSO USE THE 45 dBA PRIVATE MODE. SPECIFY THE AREAS. REFER TO NFPA 72 4-3.3, NFPA 101 7-6.3.5 AND UL 464.3.2.

1) Fire command room.

2) Supervisor’s office.

3) Elevator cars.

4) Restrooms.

5) Patient sleeping areas.


REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 72 4-3.1.4, 4-3.3.2 AND APPENDIX A4-3.3.2.

3. Private mode audible signals in mechanical equipment rooms sound, having a sound level of not less than 100 dBA at 10 feet, nor more than 120 dBA at the minimum hearing distance from the audible appliance. Also, the audible signal has a sound level at least 10 dBA above the average ambient sound level or 5 dBA above the maximum sound level having a duration of at least 60 seconds, whichever is greater, measured 5 feet above the floor.


FOR SYSTEMS WHERE RELOCATION OF OCCUPANTS IS THE INTENT OF THE BUILDING’S FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN, USE TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW WHEN A PRE-RECORDED RELOCATION MESSAGE IS DESIRED IN ADDITION TO AN AUDIBLE RELOCATION ALARM.

4. Public mode audible alarm signals sound. A public mode alert tone of 3 to 10 seconds continuous duration sounds and is followed by a pre-recorded message (or messages over the systems’ multi-channel function). The message is repeated 3 times to direct the occupants of the alarmed zone to other zones in accordance with the building’s fire management plan. Failure of the pre-recorded message causes the audible alarm to immediately sound a relocation signal on the alarm floor and the floor above.

a. Alert tone, pre-recorded message and audible alarm relocation signal have a sound level of not less than 75 dBA at 10 feet nor more than 120 dBA at the minimum hearing distance from the audible appliance. Also, the audible signal has a sound level at least 15 dBA above the average ambient sound level or 5 dBA above the maximum sound level having a duration of at least 60 seconds (whichever is greater) measured 5 feet above the floor in each occupiable area.

INCLUDE NEXT TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW WHEN THE INTENT IS MANAGED RELOCATION OF PERSONNEL ONLY DURING NORMAL WORKING HOURS IN A FULLY OCCUPIED BUILDING. MODIFY SUBPARAGRAPHS AS REQUIRED TO SUIT PROJECT CONDITIONS.

b. Between 7:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday (regularly scheduled working days): Audible alarm notification appliances sounds the alert tone and pre-recorded message on the alarm floor and the floor above in accordance with the building’s fire management plan.

c. Holidays, weekends and after 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. Monday thru Friday: Audible alarm notification appliances sound an ANSI S3.41 evacuation signal throughout the building. Evacuation signal is synchronized within each notification zone.


FOR SYSTEMS WHERE RELOCATION OF OCCUPANTS IS THE INTENT OF THE BUILDING’S FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN, USE THREE SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW WHEN A PRE-RECORDED MESSAGE IS NOT DESIRED (ATTENDANT MUST BE ON DUTY 24 HOURS PER DAY).

5. Public mode audible signals sound. A public mode alert tone of 3 to 10 seconds continuous duration sounds and is followed by an attendants live message ( or messages over the systems’ multi-channel function). The attendant directs the occupants of the alarmed zone to other zones in accordance with the building’s fire management plan.

a. Alert tone and message have a sound level of not less than 75 dBA at 10 feet nor more than 120 dBA at the minimum hearing distance from the audible appliance. Also, the audible signal has a sound level at least 15 dBA above the average ambient sound level or 5 dBA above the maximum sound level having a duration of at least 60 seconds (whichever is greater) measured 5 feet above the floor in each occupiable area.

b. Alert tone automatically sounds on the alarm floor and the floor above.


USE TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW WHERE EVACUATION OF OCCUPANTS IS THE INTENT OF THE BUILDING’S FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN.

6. Audible alarm notification appliances sound a public mode ANSI S3.41 evacuation signal in the alarm signal initiation zone and other zones in accordance with the buildings fire evacuation plan. Evacuation signal is synchronized within each notification zone.

a. Audible alarm evacuation signal has a sound level of not less than 75 dBA at 10 feet nor more than 120 dBA at the minimum hearing distance from the audible appliance. Also, the audible signal has a sound level at least 15 dBA above the average ambient sound level or 5 dBA above the maximum sound level having a duration of at least 60 seconds (whichever is greater) measured 5 feet above the floor in each occupiable area.


REFERENCE TO SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 72 4-3.1.5.

7. Prerecorded, synthesized, and live message emergency voice/alarm messages are reproduced with voice intelligibility.

a. Voice intelligibility exceeds the requirements of IEC 60849 (Sound Systems for Emergency Purposes) Annex B, Clause B1, and other methods of determining intelligibility in accordance with NFPA 72 A4.3.1.5.

8. The system allows the attendant to:



REFERENCE FOR AREAS OF PUBLIC ASSEMBLY IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 101 8-3.4 AND NYSUFP&BC 791.2.

a. Determine that the alarm signals in areas of public assembly occupiable by more than 300 persons are being received in those areas.

b. Override previously initiated alarm signals on each channel for live voice instruction, and have priority over any subsequent automatically initiated signals on that channel.

c. Silence any alarm signal in progress through a silence command issued from the FCS, but subsequent actuation of initiating devices on other initiating device circuits or subsequent actuation of addressable initiating devices on signaling line circuits causes the system to resound and record the alarm.

1) Silencing of an audible alarm does not cancel any visible zone alarm indicators.

2) A silencing means that is left in the “off” position when there is no alarm operates an audible trouble signal until the means is restored to normal.

d. Activate the alarm notification appliances on selected floors, and all floors. The attendant chooses the method of activating the alarm notification appliances:

1) Appropriate keyboard commands issued from the FCS.



OMIT SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IF RA/CC IS NOT USED.

2) Dedicated switches in the RA/CC at the FCS.


INCLUDE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IN CONJUNCTION WITH TOUCHSCREEN FCS.

3) Touchscreen and mouse “point and click” commands.


OMIT REFERENCE TO RA/CC IF NOT REQUIRED IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW.

9. Visual indicators in the RA/CC at the FCS indicate on/off status of the alarm notification appliances.



REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 101 7-6.3.2.

10. Alarm signal does not sound in stairwells or elevators.

11. Actuation of smoke detecting devices in stairwells, or elevator shafts do not sound the alarm signal, but activates all other FCS alarm functions.

SHOW WHERE VISUAL NOTIFICATION APPLIANCES ARE REQUIRED. REFER TO NFPA 72 CHAPTER 4, NYSUFP&BC 1060.2(a)(7), AND ANSI A117.1 CHAPTER 7. DO NOT SHOW VISUAL ALARMS AND AUDIBLE ALARMS CONNECTED ON THE SAME CIRCUITS.
REFER TO NFPA 72 4-4 FOR PUBLIC MODE VISIBLE CHARACTERISTICS AND NFPA 72 4-5 FOR PRIVATE MODE VISIBLE CHARACTERISTICS.

12. Public and private mode visual alarm notification appliances illuminate and flash a fire warning signal.

a. Public mode visible signaling flash rate does not exceed 2 flashes per second, nor less than one flash every second throughout the listed voltage range of the appliance.

1) The maximum pulse duration is 0.2 seconds with a maximum duty cycle of 40 percent. The pulse duration is defined as the time interval between initial and final points of 10 percent of maximum signal.


NYSUFP&BC 1060.2(A)(7), IN SCHOOLS FOR THE DEAF, REQUIRED FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS SHALL BE PROVIDED WITH RED SIGNAL LIGHTS IN ROOMS WHERE STUDENTS CONGREGATE, IN ADDITION TO THE SOUNDING DEVICES.

2) The light source is clear or nominal white and does not exceed 1000 candela (effective intensity).

b. All strobes are synchronized to flash simultaneously to reduce the probability of photo-sensitive reactions.

c. Visual alarms continue to flash until the initiating devices are restored to normal condition and the system is manually reset.


REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 72 2-10.6, 3-9.6, NYSUFP&BC 1060.9, 1061.2( c)(4) & NFPA 101 7-6.5.

13. Electromagnetic door hold-open devices de-energize, allowing the associated smoke doors to close.



COORDINATE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW WITH HARDWARE DESIGNER. REFER TO NFPA 72 3-9.7, NYSUFP&BC 1061.2( c)(5), 1061.4 & NFPA 101 7-6.5.

14. Locked doors for re-entry from exit stairwells, exit doors, and emergency exits release their fail safe door lock mechanisms so that associated doors may be opened.



NEXT TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS ARE REQUIRED BY NYC BUILDING CODE RS 17-3A 15.

a. Elevator fire service operation causes door lock mechanisms to release.

b. Doors may be opened (unlocked) from the FCS.

IF ANY OF THE NEXT SEVERAL SUBPARAGRAPHS APPLICABLE TO SMOKE/FIRE CONTROL ARE USED, REFER TO NFPA 72 3-9.5, NFPA 90, 92A, 92B, AND NYSUFP&BC 1004.2(e)(2), (3) & (4) 1004.2(f)(2), AND 1061.2( c) (6). COORDINATE WITH HVAC.
REFER TO NYC BUILDING CODE 27-972 (f)(9). NYC CODE BUREAU WILL NOT ALLOW TIE IN TO DDC SYSTEM. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM MUST SHUT DOWN FANS, ETC.
REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NYSUFP&BC 1004.2(e)(3), NFPA 90A 4-4.4.2.

15. Selected HVAC equipment (ventilating fans, air handling units, ______) shut down.



COORDINATION FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW. IN A SPRINKLERED BUILDING FIRE ALARM ZONES MAY ALSO BE SAME AS SPRINKLER ZONES.

a. Fire alarm zones are coordinated with the smoke control zones that they actuate.


REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 72 3-9.5.3 AND NFPA 90A 4-4.4.2.

b. Actuation of air duct smoke detecting devices used solely for HVAC system shutdown does not sound the alarm signal but activates all other FCS alarm functions.


REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 90A 4-2.

c. Each air distribution system supply, return, and exhaust fan can be manually stopped by the attendant at the FCS during an emergency.



REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NYSUFP&BC 1004.2(e)(4). SHOW LOCATION OF SWITCH.

d. An emergency switch for each system ventilating an assembly space is located to enable manual shut down of the system in case of fire or smoke. A sign located adjacent to the switch states instructions for system shut down.



REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 90A 4-4.2 & 4-4.3.
16. Smoke detectors listed for use in air distribution systems and located as indicated below, automatically stop their respective fan(s) on detecting the presence of smoke:

a. Downstream of the air filters and ahead of any branch connections in air supply systems having a capacity greater than 2000 ft.³/min.

b. At each story prior to the connection to a common return and prior to any recirculation or fresh air inlet connection in air return systems having a capacity greater than 15,000 ft.³/min. and serving more than one story.

REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NYSUFP&BC 1004.2(e)(2).

17. Safety controls operate for every system using recirculated air and serving an area of public assembly or more than one fire area, or more than one story of a building:

a. When the air in the system contains smoke of predetermined intensity or has an abnormal rise in temperature, the fans causing normal circulation in such area stops and requires manual reset at the fire alarm control panel.

b. Smoke detectors located in the return air system on each floor function as the safety control and stop the recirculating fans serving the affected area, and activate an alarm at the FCS.


REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NYSUFP&BC 1004.2(e)(5).

18. Automatic devices for systems ventilating high hazard spaces stop the fans when the air in the system contains smoke of a predetermined quantity or has an abnormal rise in temperature. Controls require manual reset.



REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NYSUFP&BC 1101.5( c)(8)(ii) FOR AREA OF REFUGE VESTIBULE AND ELEVATOR LOBBY.

19. Selected fans pressurize stairwells, and elevator lobby and its adjoining elevator shaft.

20. Fire dampers and smoke dampers close.

REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 90A 4-3.

a. Actuation of air duct smoke detecting devices used solely for the closing of dampers does not sound the alarm signal but activates all other FCS alarm functions.

b. Attendant at the FCS may manually position the smoke dampers.

c. Smoke dampers which isolate the air-handling system close automatically when the system is not in operation.

d. Smoke dampers installed in smoke barriers may remain open during fan shutdown provided that their associated controlling damper actuators and smoke detecting devices remain operational. Dampers close automatically when the fan system they are serving is not in operation.

REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 75 8-1.1.

e. Dampers in HVAC systems serving computer areas and automatic fire and smoke dampers installed where ducts pass through fire-resistant-rated construction operate upon activation of smoke detecting devices and by operation of the computer room disconnecting means for all electronic equipment, dedicated HVAC systems servicing the computer room, and uninterruptible power supplies.


1. SHOW SMOKE DETECTING DEVICE SPECIFICALLY ASSOCIATED WITH THE OPERATION OF EACH ROLLING FIRE SHUTTER AND FIRE DOOR. REFER TO NFPA 80 1-10, 6-4.1, 6-4.2.


2. SHOW EMERGENCY RELEASING DEVICE CONTROL PANEL (BY OTHERS) ASSOCIATED WITH EACH ROLLING FIRE SHUTTER AND DOOR WHICH IS CONNECTED TO THE FIRE ALARM SYSTEM

3. SHOW 120VAC CIRCUIT CONNECTED TO RELEASING DEVICE CONTROL PANEL IN ADDITION TO POWER CIRCUIT REQUIRED FOR MOTOR OPERATOR IF SO EQUIPPED (ADDITIONAL 120VAC CIRCUIT MAY NOT BE REQUIRED IN ALL CASES FOR MOTORIZED SYSTEMS DEPENDING ON MOTOR HORSEPOWER AND TYPE OF OPERATOR).

4. SHOW WIRING FROM FIRE ALARM PANEL TO RELEASING DEVICE CONTROL PANEL. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM CAN ONLY ACTUATE CLOSING. THERE IS NO PROVISION AVAILABLE WITHIN THE RELEASING DEVICE CONTROL PANEL TO HAVE THE FIRE ALARM SYSTEM MONITOR THE BATTERY OR ANY OTHER TROUBLE CONDITIONS. THERE IS A FORM C CONTRACT AVAILABLE THAT COULD BE CONNECTED TO THE FIRE ALARM SYSTEM SHOWING THAT THE RELEASING DEVICE CONTROL PANEL HAS OPERATED.

5. VERIFY THAT THE SPECIFICATION FOR THE EMERGENCY RELEASING DEVICE CONTROL PANEL IN SECTION 083323 ENCOMPASSES THE OPERATION SPECIFIED IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW.

21. Non-motorized rolling fire shutters and fire doors close when the associated smoke detecting devices are actuated. The fire alarm system initiates closure through the fire door’s emergency releasing device control panel:

a. There is a ten second delay before door releases.

b. An audible and visual warning occurs during the time delay and during closing cycle that the door is closing.

c. The releasing device control panel independently performs other safety and operational functions associated with fire door closing during alarm condition.

22. Motorized rolling shutters and fire doors close when the associated smoke detecting devices are actuated. The fire alarm system initiates closure through the fire door’s emergency releasing device control panel:

a. For doors which require mechanical resetting after release:

1) There is a ten second delay before door releases.

2) An audible and visual warning occurs during the time delay and during closing cycle that the door is closing.

3) Electric operator closes the door with motor power upon alarm, when power is available to the motor operator.

4) When power is not available to the motor operator during alarm condition, the ten second delay and warnings are initiated before door release.

5) The releasing device control panel independently performs other safety and operational functions associated with fire door closing during alarm condition.

b. For doors which do not require mechanical setting:

1) Electric operator closes the door with motor power upon alarm, when power is available to the motor operator.

2) When power is not available to the motor operator (alarm condition or no alarm condition) the door closes by gravity as soon as power fails.

3) The releasing device control panel independently performs other safety and operational functions associated with fire door closing during alarm condition.


FOR NEXT TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS REFER TO NYSUFP&BC 739.4(d)(8), 771.4(h)(10) 1060.9, 1061.2( c)(3).

1. SHOW SMOKE DETECTING DEVICE SPECIFICALLY ASSOCIATED WITH THE OPERATION OF EACH ROOF VENT.

2. SHOW WIRING TO EACH ROOF VENT EMERGENCY ELECTRIC RELEASE DEVICE.

3. SHOW WIRING TO EACH ROOF VENT “OPEN” SWITCH.

23. Heat and smoke roof vents open when the associated smoke detecting devices are actuated. Visual indicators in the RA/CC’s illuminate, indicating which roof vents are open.



CHECK WITH ELEVATOR DESIGNERS FOR DETAILS ON HOISTWAY VENTING. MODIFY SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW TO SUIT. REFER TO NFPA 72 3-9.3.4 EXCEPTION NO. 2.

24. Elevator hoistway heat and smoke vents open when the associated smoke detecting devices are actuated. Visual indicators in the RA/CC’s illuminate, indicating which vents are open.



FOR THE NEXT SEVERAL SUBPARAGRAPHS PERTAINING TO ELEVATOR EMERGENCY RECALL OPERATION, REFER TO NFPA 72 3-9.3, ANSI/ASME A17.1, AND NYSUFP&BC 1062.7(b). COORDINATE WITH ELEVATOR DESIGNERS.
REFER TO NYC BUILDING CODE SUBCHAPTER 18 27-991 WHICH STATES THAT ELEVATORS SHALL BE SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF SUBCHAPTER 18 AND REFERENCE STANDARD RS 18-1 (WHICH IS ANSI/ASME A17.1). RS 18-1 MODIFIES THE RULES OF A17.1.

FOR ELEVATOR RECALL FOR FIREFIGHTERS’ SERVICE, NFPA 72 3-9.3.4 STATES THAT “SMOKE DETECTORS SHALL NOT BE INSTALLED IN ELEVATOR HOISTWAYS” (WITH 2 EXCEPTIONS). IN SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW REMOVE THE WORD “HOISTWAY” UNLESS IT COMPLIES WITH EXCEPTION NO. 1 (WHERE THE TOPE OF THE ELEVATOR HOISTWAY IS PROTECTED BY AUTOMATIC SPRINKLERS), OR EXCEPTION NO. 2 (WHERE A SMOKE DETECTOR IS INSTALLED TO ACTIVATE THE ELEVATOR HOISTWAY SMOKE RELIEF EQUIPMENT).
REFER TO NYC BUILDING CODE 27-972 (f)(8), AND RS 18-1 RULE 211.3B (2 DETECTING DEVICES ARE REQUIRED IN EACH LOBBY AND FLOOR WITH SPECIFIC SPACING REQUIREMENTS).

25. Phase I automatic elevator recall for fire fighter’s service operates upon actuation of an elevator lobby ionization smoke detector or multi-sensor (smoke/heat) located on ceiling immediately above the call button (excluding the designated floor lobby smoke detecting device) or actuation of an associated hoistway or machine room smoke detecting device. All elevators that service that lobby return non-stop to the designated floor. (If the smoke detecting device at the designated floor is activated, the elevators that serve that level return non-stop to the alternate floor).

a. Each elevator lobby, hoistway and machine room smoke detecting device is capable of initiating elevator recall when all other devices on the same initiating device circuit have been manually or automatically placed in the alarm condition.

b. The elevator automatic (smoke detecting devices) and manual (two and three position key switches) Phase I Emergency Recall Operation and the Phase II Emergency In-Car Operation operate in accordance with the applicable ANSI/ASME A17.1 Rules 211.3 thru 211.8 and NFPA 72 3-9.3, as amended by NYC Building Code Subchapter 18 and Reference Standard RS 18-1.

c. For each group of elevators, three separate elevator control circuits terminate at the designated elevator controller within the group’s elevator machine room.

d. The smoke detecting devices actuate the three elevator control circuits as follows:

1) The smoke detecting devices located in the designated elevator recall lobby actuates the first elevator control circuit. In addition, where the elevator is equipped with front and rear doors, the smoke detecting devices in both lobbies at the designated level actuate the first elevator control circuit.

a) The first control circuit prevents recalling the elevators and discharging passengers to the designated floor when the designated floor is the fire location, and to provide for an alternate recall location when the designated floor is reporting a fire condition;

2) The smoke detecting devices in the remaining elevator lobbies actuate the second elevator control circuit.

a) The second control circuit provides standard recall to the designated floor when any other elevator lobby, machine room or hoistway smoke detecting device is in alarm;

3) The smoke detecting devices in elevator hoistways and the elevator machine room(s) actuate the third elevator control circuit. In addition, where the elevator machine room is located at the designated level, that elevator machine room smoke detecting device also actuates the first elevator control circuit.

a) The third control circuit is for the safety of the fire fighters who may be using the elevators to bring equipment to staging areas. This circuit also overrides the fire fighter’s key operation and brings the elevators to a safe level of discharge prior to equipment shutdown due to fire in hoistway or machine room. The circuit also sounds a warning in the elevator cab notifying the fire fighters using the elevator to immediately move to a safe floor and exit the elevators;


TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW ARE REQUIRED BY NFPA 72 3.9.3.6.

26. Each elevator lobby, hoistway, and machine room smoke detecting device, when actuated, initiates a system alarm condition. The alarmed zone, or addressable device is visually annunciated at the FCS and the ICUs associated with the elevators.

a. Additionally, the hoistway and machine room smoke detecting devices visually annunciate at the FCS and ICUs separately and distinctly from other visual annunciation, to alert fire fighters and other emergency personnel that the elevators are no longer safe to use due to smoke and fire intrusion into the hoistways and machine rooms.

CHECK WITH ELEVATOR DESIGNERS FOR DETAILS OF ELEVATOR SHUTDOWN. SHOW DESIGN ON DRAWINGS. TYPE OF HEAT DETECTING DEVICE USED MUST BE COORDINATED WITH SPRINKLER HEADS TO ENSURE THAT HEAT DETECTING DEVICE WILL RESPOND BEFORE THE SPRINKLER HEADS. REFER TO ANSI A17.1, RULE 102.2 AND NFPA 72 3-9.4.

27. Elevator Shutdown Prior to Sprinkler Operation:



THE FOLLOWING SUBPARAGRAPHS SPECIFY ONE METHOD OF ACCOMPLISHING ELEVATOR SHUTDOWN. OTHER METHODS INCLUDE (CHECK WITH SPRINKLER DESIGNER FOR APPROPRIATE METHOD):

1. USE HEAT DETECTOR TO SHUNT TRIP THE CIRCUIT BREAKER. A SECOND SET OF CONTACTS IN THE HEAT DETECTOR IS USED TO MONITOR THE ALARM. REMOTE ADDRESSABLE NETWORK MODULES MONITOR POWER TO SHUNT TRIP CIRCUIT.

2. HEAT DETECTOR OPERATES SOLENOID VALVE TO ALLOW WATER TO FLOW INTO THE SYSTEM. THIS METHOD USUALLY OPERATES THROUGH A CONTROL PANEL FOR MONITORING, ALARM AND TRIPPING FUNCTIONS.

a. Dedicated elevator shutdown ICUs located in each elevator machine room, in conjunction with heat detecting devices located within two feet of each sprinkler head monitors the hoistways and machine rooms for heat/fire conditions.

1) The heat detecting device has both a lower temperature rating and a higher sensitivity as compared to the sprinkler, to ensure heat detecting device response prior to sprinkler head operation.

2) The elevator shutdown ICUs and heat detecting devices are independent of the sprinkler system.

b. Smoke detecting devices located in each hoistway and elevator machine room monitor the hoistways and machine rooms for smoke/fire conditions. The smoke detecting devices are connected to system ICUs. The smoke detecting devices are not connected to the elevator shutdown ICUs. Sequence of Events:

1) Smoke in a machine room or hoistway during the initial stages of a fire activate the system smoke detecting devices, causing the system to perform the elevator recall functions.

2) As the intensity of the fire builds, the elevator shutdown heat detecting devices actuate, causing the elevator shutdown ICU to shunt trip the circuit breaker serving the main power line to affected elevators prior to the application of water. The sprinkler system operates independently after the affected elevator has shutdown.

3) Activation of elevator machine room or hoistway heat detecting devices are indicated by an audible alarm and a visual indicator in the FCS. Refer to NFPA 72 A-3.9.4.4 for a typical method of providing elevator power shunt trip supervisory signal


FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW, REFER TO NFPA 72 3-9.4.4. AND APPENDIX A3-9.4.4. FOR DIAGRAM SHOWING TYPICAL METHOD OF PROVIDING ELEVATOR POWER SHUNT TRIP SUPERVISORY SIGNAL.

c. Control circuits to shut down elevator power are monitored for presence of operating voltage. Loss of power to the control circuit for the disconnecting means causes a supervisory signal to be indicated at the ICU and FCS.



SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS REQUIRED UNDER CERTAIN CONDITIONS BY NFPA 101 7-4.7.

28. Elevator machine rooms that contain solid-state equipment for elevators automatically operates the elevator machine rooms’ independent ventilation or air conditioning system to maintain room temperature during fire fighters’ service operation.

a. The operating temperature must remain at or below the temperature established by the elevator equipment manufacturer’s specifications.

b. When elevator room operating temperature is exceeded, a supervisory signal is indicated at the FCS.



SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS REQUIRED BY NYC BUILDING CODE RS 17-3A 15.(d).

29. Doors that do not fail safe unlock. The door unlocking release mechanisms are operated from a separate control relay having the capability of indicating trouble on a separate trouble signal and at the information display at the FCS and at the mechanical control center. The mechanism also indicates a “failed” and “open” status at the FCS and at the mechanical control center.



IF SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS USED, REFER TO NFPA 101 7-6.5.

30. Emergency lighting energizes.


IF SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS USED, REFER TO NFPA 101 7-6.5. ALSO, AREAS CONTAINING GAS DISTRIBUTION PIPING OPERATING AT LEVELS ABOVE 15 PSIG REQUIRE A COMBUSTIBLE GAS DETECTION ALARM SYSTEM, AND A SUITABLE FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM. REFER TO NYC BUILDING CODE ARTICLE 5 27-968 (b).

31. Gas and fuel supplies shut off.


FOR ONE-WAY LOUDSPEAKER REQUIREMENTS IN ELEVATOR GROUPS IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.3.5.6.3. CONSULT WITH ELEVATOR DESIGNERS. FOR STAIRWAYS REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.3.5.6.4.

D. Attendant may activate the multi-channel one-way voice communication portion of the system and call over speakers on selected floors, all floors, each stairwell, and each elevator to deliver verbal instructions to building occupants or request persons responsible for building fire safety to deliver status reports via the two-way telephone communication system.

1. The attendant chooses the method of selecting the speakers:

a. Appropriate keyboard commands issued from the FCS.



OMIT SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IF RA/CC IS NOT USED.

b. Activation of dedicated switches in the RA/CC at the FCS.



INCLUDE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IN CONJUNCTION WITH TOUCHSCREEN FCS.

c. Touchscreen and mouse “point and click” commands.

2. Pressing a constant pressure push-to-talk switch on the microphone causes the selected speakers to respond immediately and the active audible alarm signals to be silenced while speakers are used for live voice instructions. Releasing switch self-restores system to the interrupted audible alarm signal.

OMIT REFERENCE TO RA/CC IF NOT REQUIRED IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW.

3. Visual indicators in the RA/CC at the FCS indicate on/off status of the speakers.


REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NYSUFP&BC 791.2.

4. The system allows the attendant at the FCS to determine that the verbal instructions in areas of public assembly occupiable by more than 300 persons are being received in those areas.

5. Verbal instructions are delivered at the same sound level in dBA and voice intelligibility as required for the emergency voice/alarm messages.

6. During an alarm condition, the multi-channel feature of the system allows the attendant to continue to selectively and simultaneously deliver messages over speakers which have not been activated for use as audible alarm notification appliances.


FOR FIRE WARDENS TWO-WAY TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION SERVICE AND FIRE SERVICE (FIRE DEPARTMENT) TWO-WAY COMMUNICATION SERVICE REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.3.7, NYSUFP&BC 1061.3(a), 1004.2(f)(2) AND NYC BUILDING CODE 27-975.

E. Two-Way Telephone Communications Service:



REFERENCE TO SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 72 4-3.1.5.

1. Telephone messages are reproduced with voice intelligibility.

a. Voice intelligibility exceeds the requirements of IEC 60849 (Sound Systems for Emergency Purposes) Annex B, Clause B1, and other methods of determining intelligibility in accordance with NFPA 72 A4.3.1.5.

FOR FIRE WARDENS TWO-WAY TELEPHONE SYSTEM SHOW AT LEAST ONE FIRE WARDEN REMOTE FLOOR COMMUNICATION STATION TELEPHONE IN EACH VOICE PAGING ZONE (NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.3.7.7), ON EVERY FLOOR (NYSUFP&BC 1061.3(b)), AND ALSO IN EACH AREA SPECIFIED BELOW.

2. Fire Warden’s Two-Way Telephone Communication System:

a. Attendant may use the fire warden’s two-way telephone communication system to converse with building fire warden personnel at each remote floor communication station telephone and with other persons responsible for building fire safety on elevators, in elevator machine rooms, telephone rooms, pump rooms, mechanical equipment rooms, and emergency equipment rooms.

IT IS NOT INTENDED FOR THE TELEPHONES PROVIDED TO BE USED TO REPORT FIRE OR OTHER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS. IF IT IS DESIRED THAT THE TELEPHONES ARE TO BE USED TO REPORT FIRES OR OTHER EMERGENCIES, THEN THE REMOTE TELEPHONES MUST BE ARRANGED SO THAT THEIR USE WILL AUTOMATICALLY PRODUCE ALL OF THE SIGNALING FUNCTIONS REQUIRED OF A MANUAL FIRE ALARM STATION AND NOT REQUIRE OPERATOR RESPONSE FOR ALARM INITIATION (UL 864 57.4.3).

b. Fire warden remote floor communication station telephones do not function as alarm initiating devices. A sign on the telephone cabinet instructs the person needing to report an emergency condition to call 911 or pull the nearest manual fire alarm box.


FOR BUILDINGS IN NYC MORE THAN 300 FEET HIGH, AN ADDITIONAL SYSTEM IDENTIFIED AS A STANDPIPE FIRELINE TELEPHONE AND SIGNALING SYSTEM IS REQUIRED FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT USE IN OPERATING THE STANDPIPE SYSTEM. REFER TO NYC BUILDING CODE 27-974 AND RS 17-3A 14.

c. Building fire warden personnel at fire warden remote floor communication station telephones and other persons responsible for building safety at other remote locations may communicate with the attendant at the FCS via the private line, two-way telephone communication system.



SHOW ON THE DRAWINGS PRIVATE LINE CIRCUITS FROM BUILDING FIRE WARDEN REMOTE FLOOR COMMUNICATION STATION TELEPHONES TO FCS.

1) Removing the receiver from its cradle at a remote telephone cabinet causes an audible tone to sound within the telephone or a lamp to illuminate on the cabinet indicating that the telephone is in operating condition. The tone continues until the call is answered.



USE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW WHEN TOUCHSCREEN/MOUSE IS NOT USED.

2) The attendant at the FCS is alerted to incoming calls (off-hook condition) from remote telephones by individual line flashing lamps for each telephone and a common audible signal. When the attendant picks up the master telephone, the audible signal may be silenced, but resounds for each remote telephone going off-hook. Line lamp continues to flash until the call is answered by placing individual line switches in the talk position. The line lamp for the answered call will then remain constantly illuminated until the attendant terminates call. A silenced audible signal operates a visible indicator and sounds a trouble signal whenever the silence means is in the silence position and there are no telephone circuits in the off-hook condition.


USE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IN CONJUNCTION WITH TOUCHSCREEN FCS.

3) The attendant at the FCS is alerted to incoming calls (off-hook condition) from remote telephones by a flashing icon or display and a common audible signal. When the attendant picks up the master telephone, the audible signal may be silenced, but resounds for each remote telephone going off-hook. The icon or display continues to flash until the call is answered. A silenced audible signal operates a visible indicator and sounds a trouble signal whenever the silence means is in the silence position and there are no telephone circuits in the off-hook condition.


USE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW WITH EITHER OF THE TWO PRECEDING SUBPARAGRAPHS.

4) The attendant may communicate privately with an individual or simultaneously with as many as 5 personnel.



SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NOT REQUIRED BY CODES BUT CAN BE ACCOMMODATED BY FIRE ALARM COMPANIES IF THE CALL FEATURE TO REMOTE TELEPHONES IS DESIRED TO ENHANCE SYSTEM CAPABILITIES. OMIT REFERENCE TO FA/CC IF NOT USED.

d. By activating switches at the FCS (or RA/CC adjacent to FCS) the attendant at the FCS can activate an audible and visual indicator at each remote telephone location to alert personnel at that location to pick up telephone. (Separate momentary contact switch for each remote telephone).



REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NYC CODE 27-972(f)(6) & RS17-3A 7(I).

e. The attendant may permit fire wardens at remote telephone locations to make announcements over the one-way voice communication system.



FOR FIRE SERVICE TELEPHONE SYSTEM SHOW A REMOTE FIRE SERVICE JACK PER FLOOR AND AT LEAST ONE JACK PER EXIT STAIRWAY, AND IN EACH FIRE PUMP ROOM (NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.3.7.6).

3. Fire Service (Fire Department) Two-Way Telephone Communication System: Fire service personnel may communicate with the attendant at the FCS via common talk two-way telephone communication system.


SHOW ON THE DRAWINGS A COMMON TALK CIRCUIT FROM ALL FIRE SERVICE JACKS TO FCS.

a. Plugging a telephone handset into a remote telephone jack station causes an audible tone to sound within the telephone handset or an LED to illuminate on the faceplate indicating that the telephone in operating condition. The tone continues until the call is answered.

b. The attendant at the FCS is alerted to an incoming call by a flashing lamp and audible signal. When the attendant picks up the master telephone, the audible signal is silenced. The lamp will remain constantly illuminated until the attendant terminates call. A silenced audible signal operates a visible indicator and sounds a trouble signal whenever the silence means is in the silence position and there are no telephone circuits in the off-hook condition.

1) The attendant may communicate simultaneously with as many as 5 fire service personnel.


CONSULT WITH ELEVATOR DESIGNERS REGARDING METHOD TO BE USED FOR ELEVATOR TWO-WAY COMMUNICATION (FIRE WARDEN’S TWO-WAY TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM SUBPARAGRAPHS ABOVE OR ELEVATOR TWO-WAY COMMUNICATION SYSTEM SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW). NYSUFP&BC 1061.3 REQUIRES TWO-WAY VOICE COMMUNICATION FROM ELEVATORS TO THE FIRE CONTROL PANEL AND ANSI A.17.1 RULES 211(a)(2) & (3) AND 211(b) REQUIRE TWO-WAY COMMUNICATIONS (WITH SOURCE OF STANDBY POWER) BETWEEN THE CAR AND A READILY ACCESSIBLE LOCATION OUTSIDE THE HOISTWAY WHICH IS AVAILABLE TO EMERGENCY PERSONNEL. NFPA 72 3-8.4.1.3.7.1 REQUIRES THE SYSTEM TO BE LISTED FOR TWO-WAY TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION SERVICE.

4. Elevator Two-Way Communication System: Attendant may use the elevator zoned two-way voice communication system master station (Section 142871) located in the FCS console to communicate with persons responsible for building safety on elevators, in elevator machine rooms, telephone rooms, pump rooms, mechanical equipment rooms and emergency equipment rooms.



FOR AREA OF REFUGE PARAGRAPH BELOW, REFER TO NYSUFP&BC 1101.5. AREA OF REFUGE IS NOT MANDATED AS PART OF A FIRE ALARM SYSTEM, BUT THE FIRE ALARM COMPANIES CAN ACCOMMODATE AREA OF REFUGE WITH THEIR OWN EQUIPMENT, OR BY USING A SEPARATE CONTROL PANEL MANUFACTURED BY COMMUNICATION COMPANIES TO MEET AREA OF REFUGE REQUIREMENTS.

F. In locations designated as “Area of Refuge”, a two-way voice communication system, including visible and audible signals with instructions for use, allows handicapped persons in need of aide to obtain assistance from facility personnel.

1. Area of Refuge initiation causes supervision signal to sound at FCS and in building manager alarm annunciators.
G. User Programmable Control-By-Event Functions:

USER PROGRAMMABLE CONTROL-BY-EVENT FUNCTIONS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO BE PART OF FIRE ALARM SYSTEM IN NYC UNLESS CONTROL-BY-EVENT FUNCTIONS PERTAIN TO FIRE SAFETY CONTROL OPERATION AS INDICATED IN EXAMPLES BELOW. SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS REQUIRED BY NFPA 101 32-8.5(f) FOR HIGH RISE BUILDINGS.

1. Diesel-alternator status conditions (Section 263215) are indicated by a supervisory signal at the FCS and a visual indicator in the RA/CC.

2. The stairwell smoke hatches can be opened with commands from the FCS. The stairwell smoke hatch status conditions (open, closed) are indicated by visual indicators at the FCS.


COORDINATE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW WITH HVAC EQUIPMENT OPERATION SPECIFIED UNDER LIFE SAFETY CONTROL-BY-EVENT FUNCTIONS. STATE WHICH EQUIPMENT IS TO BE OPERATED.

3. HVAC equipment (fans, air handling units, _____) can be manually operated for fire/smoke control. Hand-Off-Automatic commands from the FCS allow the attendant to control each HVAC equipment. The equipment status conditions (running, off, automatic) are indicated by visual indicators at the FCS.


OMIT SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW (AUTOMATIC TIME-INITIATED FUNCTIONS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO BE PART OF FAS IN NYC. USER PROGRAMMABLE AUTOMATIC TIME-INITIATED BUILDING OPERATION FUNCTIONS MUST BE PART OF A BUILDING’S CONTROL SYSTEM).

H. User Programmable Automatic Time-Initiated Functions (Start/Stop, On/Off, Secure/Access, etc.): Not Applicable:


I. The attendant manually resets system at the FCS at conclusion of alarm condition. When an alarm condition is corrected, a print-out and display occurs at the FCS stating the assigned reset message for the point in alarm with the date, time and reset suffix.

1. Manually resetting the system requires only one attendant operation.

2. Only reset messages that are of significant importance to the attendant for system operation are printed.

a. A printing suppression program eliminates superfluous system reset messages.

3. Resetting the system does not disturb system control points or functions.
J. Primary and Secondary Power Supplies:

1. Failure of primary power supplies automatically transfers the affected portions of the system to the secondary power supplies:


EDIT NEXT TWO SUBPARAGRAPHS FOR ITEMS NOT REQUIRED, OR THAT CANNOT BE ENERGIZED BY THE SECONDARY POWER SUPPLIES.

a. Initiating, notification, print recording/printer, visual indication (including CRT/keyboard), and supervisory functions of the system are transferred without loss to the secondary power supplies.

1) Ground fault indication, battery trouble conditions, remote CRT’s, and remote printers, are not required to transfer to the secondary power supplies.

b. System power requirements are transferred to the secondary power supplies except door hold open devices, door lock releases, controls for selected HVAC equipment, fire dampers, and smoke dampers.

c. Audible and visual indication of alarm condition when operating system on secondary power supply is:

1) Performance of each ICUs assigned audible and visual alarm functions.

2) Sounding of the FCS’s audible alarm.

3) Illumination of the FCS’s system alarm lamp or flashing display.

4) Display and printing of assigned message on CRT/Keyboard and printer at the FCS.


CHANGE 24 HOURS TO 60 HOURS IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IF SYSTEM IS CONNECTED TO FIRE DEPARTMENT VIA AUXILIARY OR REMOTE SYSTEM. THE TIME PERIOD OF 24 (OR 60) HOURS IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW MAY BE REDUCED IF A DIESEL-ALTERNATOR SYSTEM MEETS THE REQUIREMENTS OF NFPA 72 1-5.2.6(b) AND 1-5.2.10. CONFLICT: NYC BUILDING CODE RS17-3A 1.(a)(2) REQUIRES EITHER “ADEQUATE EMERGENCY POWER IF AVAILABLE” OR STORAGE BATTERY POWER. IF BATTERIES, RS17-3A 4.(a) REQUIRES 24 HOUR SUPERVISORY OPERATION OF THE SYSTEM FOLLOWED BY A 6 HOUR TOTAL SYSTEM LOAD. ALSO REFER TO NFPA 72 1-5.2.6 FOR BATTERY CAPACITY REQUIREMENTS.

3. Utilizing the secondary battery power supplies, the system operates under supervisory condition for 24 hours, followed by 6 hours total system load.

a. At the end of the time period the secondary battery power supplies also have capacity to operate the rolling fire shutter, fire door and heat and smoke roof vent emergency electric release devices.

1) The maximum power required to operate each heat and smoke roof vent emergency electric release device is 2.5 amperes at 24 Vdc for1 minute.



INCLUDE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IF THE TIME PERIOD OF 24 (OR 60) HOURS PREVIOUSLY SPECIFIED HAS BEEN REDUCED.

b. The secondary supply in addition to the battery standby power supplies, also includes connection to an automatic starting diesel-alternator system which will operate the system for 24 hours.

4. Upon restoration of primary power supply, the system reverts to normal operation without loss, attendant intervention, or manual re-start procedures.
K. Monitoring Integrity of Installation Conductors and Other Signaling Channels:

1. Performance of Signaling Line Circuits:


OTHER CLASSES AND STYLE ARE AVAILABLE OTHER THEN THOSE INDICATED BELOW. REFER TO NFPA 72 TABLE 3-6. OPTICAL FIBER CABLES ARE ONLY AVAILABLE STYLE 4 OR 7. ELECTRONIC CABLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR ALL STYLES.

a. Circuits from FCS to ICU’s: NFPA 72, Class A, Style 7. A print-out and display occurs to identify trouble conditions.

b. Circuits from ICU’s to ICU’s: NFPA 72, Class A, Style 7. A print-out and display occurs to identify trouble conditions.

c. Circuits from ICU’s to Addressable Devices: NFPA 72, Class B, Style 4. A print-out and display occurs to identify trouble conditions.


INCLUDE SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IF MODEM UNITS ARE USED.

d. Modem Unit Signaling Line Circuits from FCS to ICU’s: NFPA 72, Class B Style 1. A print-out and display occurs to identify trouble conditions.

2. Performance of Initiating Device Circuits:

OTHER CLASSES AND STYLES ARE AVAILABLE OTHER THAN THOSE INDICATED IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW. REFER TO NFPA 72 TABLE 3-5. OMIT REFERENCE TO SPRINKLER IF NOT APPLICABLE.

a. Circuits from ICUs to Initiating Devices (Fire Alarm, Sprinkler): NFPA 72, Class B, Style C. A print-out and display occurs to identify trouble conditions.

3. Performance of Notification Appliance Circuits:

OTHER CLASSES AND STYLES ARE AVAILABLE OTHER THAN THOSE INDICATED IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW. REFER TO NFPA 72 TABLE 3-7.

a. Circuits from ICUs to Notification Appliances: NFPA 72, Class B, Style Y. A print-out and display occurs to identify trouble conditions.

4. Monitoring Integrity of Emergency Voice/Alarm Communications Systems:

a. Audio amplifier failure indicates trouble condition. (System switches to spare audio amplifier upon failure of active amplifier).

b. Tone-generating equipment failure indicates trouble condition.

c. Voice Communication Main Audio Bus:

1) Circuits from FCS to ICU’s: NFPA 72, Class A, Style 6. A print-out and display occurs to identify trouble conditions.

2) Circuits from ICU’s to ICU’s: NFPA 72, Class A, Style 6. A print-out and display occurs to identify trouble conditions.

d. Two-Way Telephone Communication Main Bus:

1) Two-way telephone communication circuits are monitored for a short-circuit fault that would cause the telephone communications circuit to become inoperative.

5. Monitoring Integrity of Power Supplies:

a. Primary and secondary power supplies are monitored for presence of voltage at the point of connection to the system. Failure of either supply results in a system trouble condition.

1) An audible and visual alarm, display and print-out indicates failure of the primary (main) power supplies, within the system, at the FCS.

2) The system also monitors the secondary battery power supplies for battery trouble conditions (low voltage/no batteries, high current and charging current).

L. Interconnection of Fire Safety Control Functions:

SUBPARAGRAPHS BELOW RELATE MOST CLOSELY WITH THE PRECEDING SUBPARAGRAPHS SPECIFYING LIFE SAFETY CONTROL-BY-EVENT FUNCTIONS UPON ALARM CONDITION. REFER TO NFPA 72 3-9 AND NFPA 101 7-6.5.
SHOW RELAY OR APPLIANCE AND WIRING THERETO WITHIN THREE FEET OF THE EQUIPMENT THAT PERFORMS FIRE SAFETY FUNCTIONS (BUILDING AND FIRE CONTROL FUNCTIONS THAT ARE INTENDED TO INCREASE THE LIFE SAFETY FOR OCCUPANTS OR TO CONTROL THE SPREAD OF FIRE).

1. A listed relay or other listed appliance connected to the fire alarm system is used to initiate control of protected premises fire safety functions and is located within 3 feet of the controlled circuit or appliance.

a. The installation wiring between the fire alarm control unit and the relay or other appliance is monitored for integrity.

b. Relays and appliances that operate on loss of power are considered self-monitoring for integrity.


REFER TO NYC BUILDING CODE 27-972(F)(9). NYC BUREAU WILL NOT ALLOW TIE IN TO DDC SYSTEM. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM MUST SHUT DOWN FANS, ETC.

2. The method(s) of interconnection between the fire alarm system and controlled electrical and mechanical equipment is monitored for integrity and is achieved by one of the following recognized means:

a. Electrical contacts listed for the connected load.

b. Listed digital data interfaces, such as serial communication ports and gateways.

c. Other listed methods.

3. Fire safety functions do not interfere with other operations of the fire alarm system.

a. Fire safety function control devices and gateways are listed as compatible with the fire alarm control unit so as to prevent interference with control unit operation caused by controlled devices and to ensure transmission of data to operate the controlled devices.


INDICATE ON DRAWINGS FIRE SAFETY CONTROL FUNCTIONS THAT REQUIRE MANUAL CONTROL.

4. Controls provided specifically for the purpose of manually overriding automatic fire safety functions provide visible indication of the status of the associated control circuits.

a. Status indicators for emergency equipment and fire safety functions are arranged to reflect the actual status of the associated equipment or function.

5. Where the fire alarm system is a component of a life safety network, and it communicates data to other systems providing life safety functions:

a. The path for communicating data is monitored for integrity, including the physical communication media and the ability to maintain intelligible communications.

b. Data received from the network does not affect the operation of the fire alarm system in any way other than to display the status of life safety network components.

c. Where non-fire alarm systems are interconnected to the fire alarm system using a network or other digital communication technique, a signal (for example, heartbeat, poll, ping, query) is generated between the fire alarm system and the non-fire alarm system. Failure of proper receipt by the fire alarm system of confirmation of the transmission indicates a trouble condition.
NEXT SEVERAL PARAGRAPHS PERTAIN TO FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM SUPERVISORY SIGNAL SERVICE. REFER TO NFPA 72 2-6, 2-7, 2-9, 3-8.3.3, AND NYSUFP&BC 1060.4(e), 1060.5(f)(2).

M. Sprinkler System Alarm and Supervision:



SHOW SPRINKLER WATER FLOW ALARMS CONNECTED TO SPRINKLER WATER

FLOW ALARM ZONES. DO NOT CONNECT SPRINKLER WATER FLOW ALARMS ON SAME ZONE WITH OTHER TYPE INITIATING DEVICES. REFER TO NFPA 13 3-10.2, 5-15.1.6 AND NFPA 72 3-8.3.2.4

1. Flow of water through a waterflow fire alarm switch causes a system alarm.

SHOW SPRINKLER CONTROL VALVE SUPERVISION CIRCUITS CONNECTED TO SPRINKLER CONTROL VALVE SUPERVISION ZONES.

2. Supervision of sprinkler system signal attachments (sprinkler valve supervisory switches, pressure switches, etc.) are arranged to indicate circuit trouble and supervisory signal conditions at the FCS for each circuit.

a. Removal of covers from water flow alarm switches indicates trouble conditions at the FCS.

3. Control valves in the sprinkler system are supervised to initiate 2 separate and distinct signals at the FCS, indicating movement of the valve from its normal position.

a. The off-normal signal is initiated during the first 2 revolutions of a hand wheel or during 1/5 of the travel distance of the valve control apparatus from its normal position.

b. The second signal indicates restoration of the valve to its normal position. (The off-normal signal remains until the valve is restored to its normal position).

N. Supervision of Pressure Sources Associated with Fire Suppression Systems:

1. Pressure sources are supervised to initiate two separate and distinct signals, one indicating that the required pressure has been increased or decreased, and the other indicating restoration of the pressure to its required value.

a. A pressure supervisory signal initiating device for a pressurized limited water supply, such as a pressure tank, indicates both high and low pressure conditions. A signal is obtained where the required pressure is increased or decreased 10 psi from the required pressure value.

REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 72 2-9.2(b).

b. A pressure supervisory signal initiating device for dry-pipe sprinkler system indicates both high and low pressure conditions. A signal is obtained when the required pressure is increased or decreased 10 psi from the required pressure value.



REFERENCE FOR SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS NFPA 13 4-3.2.3.

c. A pressure supervisory switch for non-interlock or double interlock preaction sprinkler system initiates a signal when the pressure is not maintained at 7 psi.

d. A steam pressure supervisory initiating device indicates a low pressure condition. A signal is obtained where the pressure is reduced to a value that is 110 percent of the minimum operating pressure of the steam operated equipment supplied.

FOR PARAGRAPH BELOW REFER TO NFPA 72 2-9.4.

O. Supervision of Water Levels Associated with Fire Suppression Systems:

1. Water storage containers associated with fire suppression systems are supervised to obtain two separate and distinct signals, one indicating that the required water level has been lowered or raised and the other indicating restoration.

a. A pressure tank supervisory initiating device detects both high and low water level conditions. A signal is initiated when the water level falls 3 inches or rises 3 inches.

b. A supervisory signal initiating device for other than pressure tanks initiates a low-water level when the level falls 12 inches.

2. Water storage containers exposed to freezing conditions are supervised to initiate 2 separate and distinctive signals, one indicating that the temperature of the water has decreased to 40 degrees F, and the other indicating restoration to a temperature above 40 degrees F.


FOR PARAGRAPH BELOW REFER TO NFPA 20 CHAPTER 6 & 7.

P. Supervision of Electric Motor Driven Centrifugal Fire Pumps:



EDIT LOCATION OF FIRE PUMP CONTROLLER LOCATION TO SUIT PROJECT.

1. Activation of contacts in the fire pump controller in Fire Pump Room are indicated by an audible signal at the FCS and a visual indicator in the RA/CC. Separate indication for each of the following conditions:

a. Main power source available visible indicator (visible indicator, constantly illuminated, demonstrating that operating voltage is available to the contactor coil).

b. Controller connected to alternate source (controller has been transferred to the alternate source, alternate source supplying power to the controller).

c. Disconnecting means is open.

d. Loss of alarm power sources.

e. Controller has operated into a motor running condition (fire pump running).

f. Loss of line power on line side of fire pump controller, in any phase (all phases monitored).

g. Phase reversal on line side of fire pump controller.

h. Automatic transfer switch isolating switch open.

2. Switch at FCS allows attendant to start fire pump for non-automatic continuous operation independent of the pressure-actuated switch. Remote station switch cannot stop the fire pump.

FOR PARAGRAPH BELOW REFERENCE TO NFPA 20 CHAPTER 8 & 9.
Q. Supervision of Diesel Engine Driven Centrifugal Fire Pumps:

EDIT LOCATION OF FIRE PUMP LOCATION TO SUIT PROJECT.

1. Activation of contacts in the engine controller in the Fire Pump Room are indicated by an audible signal at the FCS and a visual indicator in the RA/CC. Separate indication for each of the following conditions.

a. Engine running.

b. The controller main switch has been turned to off or manual position.


SEVERAL ENGINE CONDITIONS ARE REQUIRED TO BE MONITORED AT THE CONTROLLER. REFER TO NFPA 20 9-4.1.3 IF IT IS DESIRED TO HAVE ALL THE CONDITIONS SEPARATELY INDICATED AT THE FCS INSTEAD OF A COMMON SIGNAL SPECIFIED IN PARAGRAPH BELOW. REFER TO NFPA 20 9-4.2(3).

c. Trouble on the controller or engine (common signal).

2. Switch at FCS allows attendant to start fire pump for non-automatic continuous operation independent of the pressure-actuated switch. Remote station switch cannot stop the fire pump.

FOR PARAGRAPH BELOW REFER TO NFPA 2-9.5 & 3-8.3.3.1.1.

R. Supervision of Room Temperature: A temperature supervisory device in areas exposed to freezing conditions associated with water automatic fire suppression systems indicates a decrease in water temperature to 40 degrees F and its restoration to above 40 degrees F.

1. Low temperature is indicated by an audible alarm at the FCS and visual indication in the RA/CC for:

ADD ADDITIONAL LOCATIONS WHERE TEMPERATURE SHOULD BE MONITORED.

a. Fire pump area.

b. Valve closets.

IN PARAGRAPH BELOW STATE THE SPECIFIC TYPES OF AUTOMATIC FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS. REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.3.2.5, 3-8.3.3, 3-8.3.4.1, 3-8.4.3 AND NYSUFP&BC 1060.7.

S. Halon and Dry Chemical Systems:

1. The system operates in conjunction with Halon, and Dry Chemical automatic fire suppression systems (AFSS’s).

a. Alarm and trouble conditions in the AFSS’s are indicated at the FCS and at the ICUs to which the AFSS’s are connected.

b. A supervisory signal at the FCS indicates off-normal condition and its restoration to normal for each automatic fire suppression system.

SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW IS AN EXAMPLE OF INTERCONNECTION OF EXISTING SYSTEMS OTHER THAN FAS.

T. The system operates in conjunction with existing Halon, and Dry Chemical Automatic Fire Suppression Systems (AFSS).

a. Alarm conditions in the existing AFSS’s are indicated at the FCS and at the ICUs to which the existing AFSS’s are connected.

b. Trouble conditions are indicated at the FCS as common trouble for each AFSS.

c. A supervisory signal at the FCS indicates off-normal condition and its restoration to normal for each existing AFSS. (Each AFSS is separately reset at its own control panel).


IN SUBPARAGRAPH BELOW INDICATE TYPE OF EXISTING FIRE ALARM SUB-SYSTEMS AND EXPOUND INTERCONNECTION DETAILS IF REQUIRED. OMIT REFERENCE TO RA/CC’S IF NOT APPLICABLE.

U. The system operates in conjunction with existing sub-systems (fire alarm systems).

a. Alarm conditions in the sub-systems are indicated at the FCS and RA/CC’s as individual zones.

b. Trouble conditions are indicated at the FCS as a common trouble for each sub-system.

c. The FCS and RA/CC control existing alarm notification appliances.

FOR PARAGRAPH BELOW REFER TO NFPA 72 3-8.3.4.1.

V. Supervision of All Fire Suppression Systems for Tampering:

1. In addition to the specific supervision functions of each fire suppression system, each system also indicates supervisory condition at the FCS whenever components of the system are tampered with, opened or removed, including:

a. Removal of covers from junction boxes on the outside of buildings.

b. Valves installed in the connection between a signal attachment and the fire suppression system to which it is attached.

c. Operation of disconnect switches which are used to allow system testing without activating the fire suppression system.




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