Ngo information submitted by the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (acri) to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights For Consideration when assessing the compliance of the State of Israel under the International Covenant on



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NGO Information submitted by the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI) to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

For Consideration when assessing the compliance of the State of Israel under the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
October 2011





The Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI)

Tel Aviv Headquarters

Nahalat Binyamin 75

Tel Aviv 65154

ISRAEL
Contact Person

Libby Lenkinski

Director International Relations

Tel: +972 (3) 5608 185

Fax: +972 (3) 5608 165

E-Mail: libby@acri.org.il





October 2011

Edited and compiled by: Libby Lenkinski, Attorney Tali Nir, Deborah Lyssy and Tal Eisenzweig.

Researched and written by: Attorney Rawia Aburabia, Rami Adut, Attorney Nisreen Alyan, Attorney Auni Banna, Attorney Maskit Bendel, Attorney Oded Feller, Attorney Gil Gan-Mor, Sharaf Hasan, Attorney Tali Nir and Attorney Keren Tzafrir.

© All rights reserved. The Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI), 2011. For more information about ACRI, please contact:

The Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI) Nahalat Binyamin 75, Tel Aviv 65154, Israel Tel: +972 (3) 5608 185 Fax: +972 (3) 5608 165

Email: mail@acri.org.il Website: www.acri.org.il/eng


Table of Contents


Introduction 1

Executive Summary 1

Article 1 – Self-determination 4

Issue 4: The Bedouin Land Rights 4

Issue 5: Discrimination in Housing, Planning and Land Allocation  12

Issue 6: The Abu Basma Council 14



Article 2 paragraph 2 - Non-discrimination 16

Issue 8: The Marginalized Position of Bedouin Women 16



Article 6 – The Right to Work 20

Issue 10: Obstacles to Employment in Israel 20

Issue 12: Obstacles to Employment in the West Bank 25

Article 7 - The right to just and favorable conditions of work 29

Issue 13: Wage Differences Between Men and Women 29

Issue 14: Complaints to the Ombudswoman for the Foreign Workers 32

Article 9 – The right to social security 34

Issue 18: Unemployment Benefits 34

Issue 20: Revocation of Residency Rights of East Jerusalem Palestinians 37

Article 10Protection of the family, mothers and children 38

Issue 21: Entry into Israel Law and Family Reunification 38


Article 11 - The right to an adequate standard of living 39

Issue 22: Poverty and the Governmental Policy toward it 39



ACRI, 'Responding to ACRI Appeal, State Doesn’t Renew Welfare-to-Work Plan', . 43

Issue 23: The Housing Crisis and the Lack of Affordable Housing 46

Issue 25: Building and Planning Policies in East Jerusalem 50

Article 12 – The right to physical and mental health 52

Issue 31: Medical Assistance for Asylum Seekers and Migrant Workers 53



Articles 13 and 14 – The right to education 54

Issue 33: Shortage of Classrooms in Schools for Arab Children 54

Issue 34: Education for Human Rights 58

Article 15 - Cultural rights 62

Issue 37: The Arabic Language 62

Issue 38: Peaceful Access to non-Jewish Holy Sites 64

Issue 39: Protection of Cultural Heritage 65



Or Kashti, 'Ministry: Remove our logo from coexistence Web site', Haaretz, 18.3.10, available under: 66

Introduction

The Association for Civil Rights in Israel [hereafter: ACRI] is pleased to present the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights [hereafter: Committee] with the following selection of issues relating to Israel's compliance with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights [hereafter: ICESCR]. The purpose of this document is to provide the Committee with alternative information for its consideration and hereby assist the Committee in preparing the concluding report. This document does in no way represent an exhaustive assessment of Israel's compliance with its obligations under ICESCR, but rather, focuses on a number of key areas, raised by the Committee in the list of issues, that ACRI is especially concerned with.
As will be elaborated and reflected in the data in this report, over the last three decades Israel has developed a policy on economic, social and cultural rights, which is characterized by sharp reduction of budgets allocated to social services and minimizing the state's responsibility for their supply. This policy is found in all aspects and provisions of economic, social and cultural rights and affect housing, education, welfare services, employment and health care issues alike.

These continued policies have grave implications on the social structure of the Israeli society which came to a point of eruption during the summer of 2011 with social protests taking place throughout the country. At last, public pressure was put on the government to achieve social change and equality. However, we have not yet seen significant changes in the governmental social policies, and we expect that economic, social and cultural rights will be on the agenda of the upcoming Knesset session, which starts on Monday, 31 October 2011. It is uncertain how the government will react and it is still early to estimate if the social unrest will result in significant changes in Israel governmental policies.



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