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Episode 32

12th November 2013

uestions for discussion


Lost Votes

  1. Explain to another student what the Lost Votes story is about.

  2. Which Australian state lost votes from the last Federal Election? Locate using Google Maps.

  3. When was the last Federal Election?

  4. Why did the Electoral Commission initially recount the votes in WA?

  5. How many ballot papers were found to be missing?

    1. 14

    2. 1,400

    3. 14,000

  6. What is normally done to keep votes safe?

  7. What institution has the power to change the election result?

  8. What are the advantages and disadvantages of an electronic voting system?

  9. Do you think Australia should change the way it votes? Explain.

  10. Do you think it is important that the missing votes are found? Explain your answer.

Write a message about the story and post it in the comments section on the BtN Lost Votes story page. http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3885258.htm

Spying Game


  1. Discuss the main points raised in the Spying Game story.

  2. Recently there have been claims that Australia has been spying on a country in the Asia-Pacific region. Name this country and locate using Google Maps.

  3. Before the spying claims relations were very bad between Australia and Indonesia. True or false?
  4. Australia has risked losing its trust from Indonesia. What does trust mean? Find a definition.


  5. Why does the Indonesian president feel betrayed by the Australian government?

  6. Why would Australia want to spy on Indonesia?

  7. Indonesia is now threatening to stop passing on information to Australia about...

    1. Drug smugglers

    2. People smugglers

    3. Animal smugglers

  8. What country was caught spying on the phones of 35 world leaders?

  9. For many countries spying is commonplace. True or false?

  10. What did you find surprising about this story?

Should Australia spy on other countries? Have your say in the BtN online poll. To vote head to the BtN website http://abc.net.au/btn/polls.htm

OzHarvest


  1. What is the name of the organisation that is helping save food from being thrown out?

  2. What are the two main issues that this organisation is tackling?

  3. Approximately how many kilos of fruit and vegetables has Four Seasons donated so far?

  4. List and illustrate some of the produce that Four Seasons has donated.

  5. Why does Paul enjoy volunteering with OzHarvest?

  6. Each year the average home throws away more than ______ dollars worth of food.

  7. At school what percentage of kids lunches end up in the bin?

    1. 10%

    2. 24%

    3. 85%

  8. What type of food did Nathan and Paul pick up from the Adelaide Convention Centre?

  9. What charity did they deliver the food to?

  10. Brainstorm a list of things you could do to help reduce food wastage at home and at school.


Check out BtN’s OzHarvest teacher resource. Students will investigate the affects of food wastage on the environment and the positive affect that food rescue and distribution can have in communities. http://www.abc.net.au/btn/resources/teacher/episode/20131112-ozharvest.pdf



Fair Games



  1. What are the Paralympics?

  2. Researchers in ________________ are working on a new way to make competition fairer in the Paralympics.

  3. Why did people question Oscar Pistorious’ performance at the London Paralympics?

  4. How did Oscar Pistorious’ impairment give him an unfair advantage?

  5. Describe some of the tests that Paralympic athletes have to go through before they compete.

  6. What three areas are being measured?

    1. Height, weight and age

    2. Movement, coordination and strength

    3. Reflexes, jumping ability and muscle tone

  7. What condition does Jarrod have?

  8. Explain the test that Jarrod has to complete.

  9. Illustrate an aspect of this story.

  10. Do you think athletes should be allowed to use artificial limbs to gain an advantage at the Paralympics? Explain your answer.

Write a message about the story and post it in the comments section on the BtN Fair Games story page. http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3885275.htm

Mime


  1. What is mime?

  2. What does mime mean in ancient Greek?

    1. To imitate

    2. To run

    3. To be happy

  3. Mime is one of the earliest forms of drama. True or false?

  4. A mime artist will often dress in which two colours?

  5. What French actor is famous for their miming performances?

  6. What Aussie performers are well known for their mime?

  7. What skills do you need to be a good mime artist?

  8. What mime routine does Tash practise in the Mime story?

  9. What colour do mime artists often paint their face?
  10. Practice the ‘trapped in a box’ mime as a class.




Test your knowledge in the Mime quiz. Go to the BtN website and follow the links.
Check out BtN’s Mime
teacher resource. Students will practise and perform their own mime, work cooperatively with other classmates and develop creativity. http://www.abc.net.au/btn/resources/teacher/episode/20131112-mime.pdf

A
Episode 32

12th November 2013

ctivity


OzHarvest
Key Learning

    Students will investigate the affects of food wastage on the environment and the positive affect that food rescue and distribution can have in communities. Students will find out how food waste is managed and find ways to control the amount of food that gets thrown out at home and at school.

    The Australian Curriculum

      Mathematics / Statistics and Probability / Data representation and interpretation

    Interpret and compare a range of data displays, including side-by-side column graphs for two categorical variables. Year 6.  (ACMSP147)

    Pose questions and collect categorical or numerical by observation or survey. Year 5. (ACMSP118)


    Describe and interpret different data sets in context. Year 6. (ACMSP120)



    Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture where one picture can represent many data values. Year 4.  (ACMSP096)







      Geography / Geographical Inquiry and Skills / Interpreting, analysing and concluding

    Interpret geographical data to identify distributions and patterns and draw conclusions. Year 4(ACHGS030)



      Geography / Geographical Knowledge and Understanding

    The sustainable management of waste from production and consumption. Year 4. (ACHGK025)

      Science / Science Understanding / Chemical sciences


    Natural and processed materials have a range of physical properties; These properties can influence their use. Year 4(ACSSU074)





    Discussion Questions

  1. What is the name of the organisation that is helping save food from being thrown out?

  2. What are the two main issues that this organisation is tackling?

  3. Approximately how many kilos of fruit and vegetables has Four Seasons donated so far?

  4. List and illustrate some of the produce that Four Seasons has donated.

  5. Why does Paul enjoy volunteering with OzHarvest?

  6. Each year the average home throws away more than ______ dollars worth of food.

  7. At school what percentage of kids lunches end up in the bin?

    1. 10%

    2. 24%

    3. 85%

  8. What type of food did Nathan and Paul pick up from the Adelaide Convention Centre?

  9. What charity did they deliver the food to?

  10. Brainstorm a list of things you could do to help reduce food wastage at home and at school.



    Activities



Class discussion

After watching the BtN OzHarvest story, facilitate a question and answer discussion to encourage students to engage with the topic and learn more about waste management.

Throughout this activity students will keep a journal entering what they know, what they have learnt and what they would like to learn. Students may want to organise their diary in the form of a KWLH chart (What do I know? What do I want to know? What have I learnt? How will I find out?).



  • What types of places might have food wastage? (E.g. hotel, convention centre, supermarket, restaurant, snack bar, canteen).

  • How often do you throw food away? Think about food thrown away at home and at school.

  • Where does your rubbish go after you have thrown it in the bin?

  • Imagine if you lived next door to a landfill? Describe how this would make you feel.

  • What types of foods can be put in the compost?

  • Do you eat leftovers? If not, where does your leftover food go?

  • What are the benefits of OzHarvest?



Food wastage challenge

Set students the challenge of tracking and measuring food wastage in their homes. In this activity the task is to find out how food waste is managed and to find ways to control the amount of food that gets thrown out at home. Students will pose questions and collect categorical or numerical data by observation and/or survey.




  • How many people live in your household?

  • Do you have a compost system at home? If so, explain how your home composting system works. What food scraps go in the compost? Who empties the compost bin? Where do the food scraps go? How do you use the compost when it has decomposed?

  • What sort of food is thrown in the rubbish?



Students will measure food wastage in their homes over a 1 week period, using the following table. A set of scales will be required for this activity.




Students will present their findings in a column graph. Below is an example.




    700






















    600






















    500






















    400




















    300






















    200






















    100

























    Monday

    Tuesday

    Wednesday

    Thursday

    Friday

    Saturday

    Sunday

What do the numbers on the vertical axis represent?

What do the numbers on the horizontal axis represent?

What days did you have the least amount of food wastage?

Why might that be?

Who would find the information on this graph useful?

Why?

What conclusions could you draw from this data?


What does this graph tell you about food wastage in your home?

Are there any patterns in the data?




The aim of this study is for students to now find ways to cut down and control the amount of food that gets thrown out at home or at school. Discuss as a class.




  • What are the benefits of a compost system? Design a simple and practical composting system for your home or school.

  • How else can you reduce food wastage?

  • What is the best way to store food so that it lasts longer?

  • Why is it important to plan and write a shopping list before you go food shopping?

Come up with some tips and ideas to reduce food wastage at home or at school.



    • don’t buy more food than you really need

    • freeze fresh produce and leftovers it you won’t have the chance to eat them before they go bad

    • use your leftover fresh produce to make jams and preserves

    • grow your own organic fruit and veggies

    • plan your meals

    • avoid impulse buying at the supermarket

    • manage your fridge so that you have a no waste policy

Visit the Foodwise website and take a look at their Food Waste Tool Kit for tips and tricks on how to reduce your food wastage. http://foodwise.com.au/category/food-waste-toolkit/




Food Garden activities

Get your class involved in a range of hands-on planting, harvesting and cooking activities. Refer to BtN’s Food Garden story http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3630908.htm and teacher resource. http://www.abc.net.au/btn/resources/teacher/episode/20121113-foodgarden.pdf




8 Related Research Links

Behind the News – Food Waste


http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3334662.htm
OzHarvest – About OzHarvest: Who are we?

http://www.ozharvest.org/ourimpact.asp?pageID=609
Think Eat Save – Reduce your footprint

http://www.thinkeatsave.org/
NSW Government – Love Food Hate Waste

http://www.lovefoodhatewaste.nsw.gov.au/
Foodwise – Home

http://foodwise.com.au/
Foodwise – Food Waste Tool Kit

http://foodwise.com.au/category/food-waste-toolkit/
Foodwise – Infographic

https://www.lunchalot.com/foodwaste.php

A
Episode 32

12th November 2013

ctivity


Mime
Key Learning

    Students will practise and perform their own mime, work cooperatively with other classmates and develop creativity.

    The Australian Curriculum

      English / Literacy / Interacting with others


    Use interaction skills when discussing and presenting ideas and information, selecting body language, voice qualities and other elements, (for example music and sound) to add interest and meaning (ACELY1804)





      English / Literacy / Interacting with others

    Use interaction skills, for example paraphrasing, questioning and interpreting non-verbal cues and choose vocabulary and vocal effects appropriate for different audiences and purposes (ACELY1796)





    Discussion Questions

  1. What is mime?

  2. What does mime mean in ancient Greek?

    1. To imitate

    2. To run

    3. To be happy

  3. Mime is one of the earliest forms of drama. True or false?

  4. A mime artist will often dress in which two colours?

  5. What French actor is famous for their miming performances?

  6. What Aussie performers are well known for their mime?

  7. What skills do you need to be a good mime artist?

  8. What mime routine does Tash practise in the Mime story?

  9. What colour do mime artists often paint their face?

  10. Practice the ‘trapped in a box’ mime as a class.



    Activities



Practise mime

As a class practice the ‘trapped in a box mime’ like Tash does in the BtN Mime story. Refer to Step 5 in the WikiHow ‘How to Mime’ tutorial http://www.wikihow.com/Mime




  • What did you find difficult?

  • How did you use your body to convey emotions, attitudes and reactions?

  • How could you make your mime interesting for your audience?

  • Why is imagination and creativity so important in the art of mime?

Ask students to choose another physical movement to mime, for example flying a kite, playing soccer or cooking a cake. Students may want to practise in front of a mirror.



How many words to do with feelings can you think of? As a class brainstorm a list of different moods and feelings, and then discuss how you might convey these through facial expressions, body language and gestures in mime. Students will form pairs and practise miming a range of emotions. Students will take it in turns miming and then guessing the emotion. Examples to get you started:



  • Nervous

  • Confused


  • Frustrated

  • Hopeful

  • Excited

  • Stern

  • Uncertain

  • Confident

Students may want to draw a range of emotions in the style of an emoticon to help with their mime.


Universal facial expression – infographic http://thumbnails.visually.netdna-cdn.com/universal-facial-expressions_50290c5f62371.jpg


Who is Marcel Marceau? – create a biography

Students will develop a biography on Marcel Marceau. Establish what students already know about Marcel Marceau. What sort of information is included in a biography? What does a biography tell us about a person?


The following website has examples of biographies for students to look at


http://www.civicsandcitizenship.edu.au/cce/contemporary_gallery,14538.html

The following plan provides a guide for students when writing a biography.



  • Research

  • Create a plan

  • Start writing

  • Edit

For a more detailed plan download this pdf document. http://planningwithkids.com/wp-content/2012/06/PWK-How-to-write-a-Biography-v1.0.pdf



    Research questions

  • Why is Marcel Marceau famous?

  • Who is Marcel Marceau’s most famous character?

  • When did Marcel Marceau make his first appearance as a mime artist?
  • Marcel Marceau is famous for his Pantomimes de Style. Describe.


  • When was he born and when did he die?

  • What was his nationality?

  • Who did he marry and did he have any children?

Encourage students to present their research using maps, timelines, drawings and photographs in an interesting way, for example using:



  • Prezi http://prezi.com/index/

  • Glogster http://www.glogster.com/

  • Bio Cube Creator http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/cube_creator/

Remind students that they will need to cite all references in a bibliography at the end of their biography.



8 Related Research Links

Behind the New – Mime Quiz



http://www.abc.net.au/btn/quiz.htm?file=/btn/quiz/js/2013-32mime.js
BtN: Episode 32 Transcript 12/11/13
On this week's show


  • I investigate the mystery of the lost votes hiding somewhere in Western Australia




  • Paul and I have collected a truck load of food and find out where it's all going later.



  • And I check out the ancient art form of mime. That's if I can get out of this box.

Hi, how's it going, I'm Nathan. We'll get to all those stories and more, later on the show today.


But first the Philippines has been hit by one of the most powerful storms ever recorded. Here's the latest.
The Wire
Can you imagine 80 percent of your neighbourhood destroyed in just hours? That's exactly what’s happened in some areas of the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan struck over the weekend. It was billed as one of the worst storms of the century.

It ripped through the Philippines before moving on toward Vietnam. During the worst of it 315km an hour winds tore apart buildings making debris into deadly weapons as it flew through the air.

People sheltered anywhere they could even on rooftops. While on the coast huge waves crashed into homes leaving very little behind.
Many thousands of people are feared dead. And many more still have been injured. But luckily evacuations saved countless lives including many kids.
Now those families are returning to what's left of their homes. But the first concern for most is the basics of life like food and drinking water. Both are in short supply. So the Australian Government is just one of the countries in the area pledging money to help.
But with such widespread destruction. The cleanup is going to be slow and incredibly painful.
PRESENTER: It's a terrible situation. You can send your messages of support by using the behind the news hashtag and we'll put them on our website. And thanks to those of you last week who got involved with the Remembrance Day conversation after we ran our story.

Spying Game



Reporter: Nathan Bazley
INTRO: Onto other news now there are claims that Australia has been spying on Indonesia. As you can imagine the Indonesians aren't too happy about it. So let's take a look at what that means for our friendship with our neighbours.
TITLE: What's the most important thing you look for in a best friend?
KID: I think humour is the best, because you wouldn't want a dull person to be your best friend.
KID: Maybe having some things in common and some things not.
KID: Maybe trust, athleticism. Well that depends on the friend.
There is a lot to think about when choosing a BFF. So imagine what it's like when you have to speak for a whole country. Just over a month ago, the leader of Australia and the leader of Indonesia did just that. They declared their two countries pretty much besties.
TONY ABBOTT, PRIME MINISTER: Bapak President, the best days of this relationship are ahead of us and they will be better days thanks to your friendship for Australia.

SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO, INDONESIAN PRESIDENT: Mr Abbott's visit shows relations are very close and very good between Indonesia and Australia.

That was the good times. But now, things have changed dramatically. And all because something that can ruin the best friendship - spying. Yes, everything went pear-shaped after claims surfaced that Australia is spying on its largest neighbour and apparent friend. Australia hasn't confirmed it yet, but Indonesia say they believe it's true. And just like your BFF at school, if there's no trust, where does that leave you?
KID: But if it was very personal I'd be very upset.
KID: If they keep doing it for a long time you wouldn't trust them anymore.
KID: If it was something with a person you wouldn't really want to be their friends kinda.
Not surprisingly, Indonesia isn't happy either. So why would Australia want to spy on its friends and risk losing that trust? Well in the world of spying, rule 1 is that pretty much everyone does it. Finding out what other nations are up to and what they're planning can help identify threats, improve trade, or negotiate better deals. So it's incredibly common, even among nations that are friends.
Not long ago, America was caught out spying on the phones of 35 world leaders, many of which are their close friends too. Germany found out about it and was far from impressed.
ANGELA MERKEL, GERMAN CHANCELLOR: Such an alliance can only be built on the basis of trust. I repeat that spying among friends is not at all acceptable for anyone.

Which brings us to the second rule of spying. Everyone does it, but whatever you do, don't get caught. Now that Australia seems to have broken that rule, Indonesia says it's striking back. It's threatening to stop passing info about people smugglers onto Australia and has also refused to take back some asylum seekers found in its waters. Australia may have gained some info through spying, but in the process, might have lost out on other vital info from a friend. So in the end, is it okay to spy on countries that are friends or not?

KID: You shouldn't actually spy on a country because they might have secret business about the whole country and not for other countries to know.
KID: I just don't think you can trust a person if you've found them spying on you.
KID: If I was the leader of another country and they were doing that to me, I wouldn't tolerate it.
Online Poll
Let's open that up to a vote.
Here's the poll question:
Should Australia spy on other countries?
Jump on the website let us know.
Last week we asked you if big crocodiles should be moved from their natural environment.
22% said yes
78% no.
Lost Votes

Reporter: Sarah Larsen


INTRO: During the election we heard a lot about how important our votes were. So how would you feel if your vote went missing? Well that's what happened in Western Australia and as Sarah reports some are worried that it might have changed the result of the election.
KID: Somewhere in Western Australia a great mystery lies waiting to be uncovered.
Hidden perhaps in plain sight. If it is not found there could be dire and expensive consequences.
My name is Nicholas Gage and I'm a professional treasure hunter.
SARAH LARSEN, REPORTER: In Western Australia a real-life mystery has been playing out and it could have serious consequences. It started with the election in September.
When the state's senate votes were added up the result was really really close. So the Electoral Commission decided to do a recount, just to make sure. On the second count the result was different. Two candidates who looked to be getting a seat missed out and two new ones got a spot. Except, not all the votes got counted. Somehow, somewhere, nearly 1,400 ballot papers went missing.
KID: How could this happen?
KID: The past is filled with many mysteries.

It is pretty unusual. In Australia votes are treated like treasures. The people in charge go to a lot of effort to keep them safe. Before they're used ballot boxes are checked and sealed. They're visible at all times and they're guarded by a polling official. Volunteers from different political parties watch over the counting to make sure nothing goes wrong. So losing any votes, even a relatively small number is really serious.

KID: Do you think someone hid them deliberately?
KID: You mean, sabotage?
While they're investigating the case, the Government says it was probably just an honest mistake. But not everyone agrees. This guy is the leader of one of the parties who won a seat in the first count, then lost in on the second. He was furious and said the election was no longer fair.
KID: We have to find those votes.
KID: No, it's too late. Even if we found them, the election winners have already been announced. The law says it's official.
KID: No. It's not democratic.
There is one institution with the power to change the election result - the High Court of Australia. And that's where the losing parties, and the Electoral Commission itself, say they'll probably take the case. The judges will have to decide whether or not the missing votes actually made a difference. And if they did, Western Australia may have to have a whole new senate election. That would be really unusual and really expensive.
Some people reckon it's a sign that Australia needs to change the way it votes. Most people here use pencils and paper to make their choice but it's not the only option. In some countries all the voting is done electronically. Computers can add up the scores and with no paper there's less chance of human error. But it's not perfect.
Some say storing votes on computers leaves them open to cyber criminals who could mess with results or break software. And with no paper it's harder to double check when things go wrong. While some think we could make e-voting secure others reckon the old fashioned way is still the best.
KID: The votes must be out there somewhere. One day we'll find them.
OzHarvest

Reporter: Nathan Bazley

INTRO: Imagine how much food 8 billion dollars would buy. Now, imagine all that food in the dump. That's how much families like yours and mine throw out each year. It's crazy. There is one group trying fix that though and I went to meet them.

NATHAN BAZLEY, REPORTER: This big yellow truck is my ride for today.
I'm riding shotgun with Paul, as he goes about his normal delivery and pickup run for OzHarvest. I'm here to find out how this organisation claims to fix two issues at once - food wastage and poverty.
NATHAN: Say hello Paul.
PAUL: Hello everybody, hi.
NATHAN: We're going on our way to our first stop this morning, which is where Paul?
PAUL: It's Four Seasons, which is a fruit and vege distributor, which provides us with a lot of fruit and vege on a daily basis.
Once we arrived, I asked the manager here why he gives OzHarvest perfectly good fruit and vege for free.
STEVE: The problem today is that a lot of fruit and vege that comes to us has a small blemish on it. And the customer doesn't want it. But it's still very good. And very good to eat.
Yep, this is all perfectly good food would usually go to waste.
STEVE: I think we've donated something like 12,000 kgs of fruit and vege. It gives us a good feeling as well.
NATHAN: It looks lovely, we've got some rocket, some apples, some bread, some potatoes, some zucchini, some nectarines, rockmelon, alfalfa, fantastic.
PAUL: Every lovely healthy food.
Meanwhile, I think Paul's starting to like having me around.
PAUL: You'll have to come out with me more often.
Next up, we have some food drop off. But before that, I wanted to ask Paul why he enjoys volunteering with OzHarvest.
PAUL: I have had people come up to me in the street and say I wouldn't eat without you people, when I'm walking down the city street. These have been people that have been street people and they've known we've delivered to certain charities and they know that that food was provided by us. And that makes you feel really terrific. It really makes you feel good.

NATHAN: What have you learnt about food wastage since you've been working here?

PAUL: I never realised the amount of food that was wasted. I just had no idea.
Well neither do most people Paul, so here are the stats. Each year, the average home throws away more than $1,000 dollars worth of food. And at school, 24% of kids lunches end up in the bin. Add it all that up and across Australia, homes ditch 7.8 billion dollars worth of food. That's about 4 million tonnes.
But not if OzHarvest have anything to do with it. Their mission is to grab as much of that waste as they can from businesses and send it to places like this. Here at the Women's Community Centre, meals are made for those in need. And some of the ingredients come from OzHarvest's deliveries. For our final stop today, Paul and I headed for the Adelaide Convention Centre. Because you can't have dinner, without dessert.
PAUL: This is the kinda stuff we get.
NATHAN: Ahh this looks really tasty.
PAUL: Oh it's absolutely fantastic.
Two trays of pastries and sweet treats for us to pack away before we get too hungry. And that was me done for the day.
NATHAN: Very good. So that's where I finish up Paul, you're going on to some more deliveries now aren't you?
PAUL: Yes I'm going north and going to 4 or 5 charities up north to distribute the load we've just collected.
NATHAN: Thanks so much for having me today, it was really interesting.
PAUL: And thanks so much for giving us the opportunity to show us what we do.
Quiz 1
They're doing a great job. Time for a quiz.
Which type of food do we waste the most?
Fresh food
Takeaways
Leftovers
Answer: Fresh Food.
A third of all food we chuck a way is fresh.
Fair Games

Reporter: Natasha Thiele

INTRO: All sports have rules to make competition fair. And in the Paralympics there are even more rules to make sure people with similar disabilities match up against each other. But as Tash reports a group of scientists are coming up with new ways to test disability with the aim of making the Paralympics fairer.

NATASHA THIELE, REPORTER: This race made headlines at last year's London Paralympics. People questioned how a couple of guys with two prosthetic legs were allowed to race athletes with just one and beat them by a huge distance. Although they were playing by the rules, some say their two blades gave them an unfair advantage. And the question of fairness has come up in other Paralympics sports too. So how do they decide who competes against who?
At the moment athletes are tested a bit like this. Here Jarrod is doing a jump test and Emma is doing a strength test.
DR SEAN TWEEDY, CLASSIFICATION RESEARCHER: I'm going to start pulling hold it hold it Emma keep holding okay and relax and I can feel from that its normal resistance and I'd give a muscle grade then from between zero and five.
Athletes are then put into a class with people with a similar level of disability. But while these tests are pretty good, it's a complicated process and it involves a bit of guess work.
JARROD LARKINS-LAW, PARAROOS PLAYER: The grey area is definitely there, you know when you go over and play other countries and you know other players you see them, you kind of wonder what classification they are and some of the countries you just don't have a clue.
Sean and his team are trying to make that grey area a little clearer. They're developing new ways to test athletes measuring stuff like movement, co-ordination and strength and recording it all into a giant database. Here Rebecca is measuring Jared's foot co-ordination. She's getting him to do a tap test on a sensored pad.
This is Guillaume. He has cerebral palsy. They're testing how far he can flex his legs. Outside on the track, they're testing the sprinting power of a young soccer player. Jarrod has to run 60 metres with string attached to his body. The device records every millimetre, which Sean puts into the system to work out Jarrod's speed.

JARROD LARKINS-LAW: It's a fair thing. So I was an eight which is the least affected and now I'm a seven which means I'm a little bit more affected so it's cool that they're putting their time into this to change the studies to make sure that the grey area is as little as possible.

When the new system is ready to be rolled out, all Paralympic athletes would need to be tested and all countries would need the right technology and equipment to do that. So that could still be several years away from happening. But for now these guys are happy that they're on the right track to making competition fairer.
Quiz 2
Let's have a quick quiz.
How many different sports were played at the 2012 Paralympics?
20
30
40
Answer: 20
They include some sports that aren't played at the Olympics, like Boccia.
Let's get a wrap up now of the best sports action from the week.
The Score
It's not often the third place getter of a race celebrates as he crosses the line. But for 20-year old rookie Marc Marquez third in the final Moto GP race of the season gave him enough points to take the world championship.
He's the youngest guy ever to win it.
******
The Wallabies have notched up a European tour victory beating Italy 50 to 20. The result made everyone feel better about their last loss to England. But don't read too much into it.
Out of 16 attempts, Italy have never beaten the wallabies before anyway.
******
And finally. You know skateboarding and you've seen motocross but what happens when the two are combined? A fair bit of pain actually. This is boardercross a race on skateboards over jumps and other obstacles.
The new sport is fresh from the US but these younger fans haven't quite learnt to appreciate the talent just yet.
KID: My favourite part of the competition is when they have stacks and fall off ramps

Mime


Reporter: Natasha Thiele

INTRO: Can you imagine trying to tell a story without making a sound? Well that's something that mime artists do. Tash went along to a class which is teaching kids how to do it.

NATASHA THIELE, REPORTER: Have you ever used your imagination to pretend something was there when it's not? These guys are finding out the secrets of mime. To really play the part of a character and to tell a story, you need to use different facial expressions, gestures and body movements. And if you can master that you can pitch a ball, catch a bus, become a pirate, even get stuck in a small box without saying a single word.
KID 1: You can't just go and just act out the mime without any expressions because let's say if it's a sad mime, you have to be like a sad face. And if it's a happy mime, it's a happy face.
KID 2: I learned more self-confidence and I think I can act better now.
KID 3: Well of course you need to learn to be quiet and you need to learn how to express words in actions rather than just saying them.
KID 4: You can be a mime wherever you are.
Mime is one of the earliest forms of drama and means 'to imitate' in ancient Greek. A mime will often dress in plain black and white coloured clothing and paint their face white like a mask. That's meant to help make their facial expressions and features more noticeable. One guy who's world famous for mime is Marcel Marceau. He was a French actor who even started his own mime school in the 1940s. While mime might not be as popular as what it was in the Marceau days, it's an art that can still be seen today in movies and comedy acts. In fact, you've probably seen these Aussies before. They're The Umbilical Brothers. They're well known for mixing mime with sound effects, conversation and props.
Jenn's been a mime artist for more than 20 years.

JENN MANDES, MIME ACTOR: Number one you have to be very very fit, number two you need to be totally concentrated because some of the things are really hard work like climbing up stairs or running, in fact you're actually doing it on the spot so you really have to work on technique.

REPORTER: So Jenn, can you show me a little mime routine?
JENN: I will show you the box. Soft hand and that's the wall and the other hand, soft and press.
Mime definitely takes a lot of concentration and imagination, but these guys have proven it's not only a great way of expressing yourself, it's also a lot of fun.

Closer
That was a pretty convincing zombie there, well done. That’s it for the show. Thanks for watching. We’ll see you next week.





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