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Episode 32

15th November 2016


uestions for discussion


New President

  1. Discuss the BtN New President story as a class. What issues were raised in the discussion?

  2. Who is the new President of the United States?

  3. What did Donald Trump do before he got into politics?

  4. What controversial things has he said during the campaign?

  5. Give reasons why people voted for Trump.

  6. What impact could his leadership have around the world?

  7. What have many world leaders said about Trump becoming president?

  8. How do you feel about Donald Trump becoming president?

  9. If you could say something to Donald Trump, what would it be?

  10. What do you understand more clearly since watching the BtN story?

Vote in the Behind the News online poll

Write a message about the story and post it in the comments section on the story page.

Air Pollution



  1. In your own words, explain what air pollution is.

  2. What is smog?

  3. What causes air pollution?

  4. How is air pollution measured?

  5. Finish the following sentence: The air was so bad that India’s government decided to…

  6. What health problems can air pollution cause?

  7. Why are young people particularly vulnerable?

  8. About how many children around the world are breathing dangerous air?

    1. 100 million
    2. 200 million


    3. 300 million

  9. What can be done to reduce air pollution?

  10. Name three facts you learnt watching the Air Pollution story.

Check out the Air Pollution resource on the Teachers page

Rural Refugees


  1. In pairs, discuss the BtN Rural Refugees story and record the main points of the discussion.

  2. Mingoola is on the boarder of which two states?

  3. Which country are the refugee families in the BtN story from?

  4. Why were they forced to leave their country?

  5. About 80% of resettled refugees come from _______________ backgrounds.

  6. Why did Mingoola want more young people moving into the town?

  7. How have the refugee families settled into the community?

  8. How do the residents of Mingoola feel about the program?

  9. Do you think the program is a good idea? Give reasons for your answer.

  10. What did you like about the BtN Rural Refugees story?



Write a message about the story and post it in the comments section on the story page

Refugee AFL Program



  1. What was the main point of the BtN story?

  2. Which country did Zimra family come from?

  3. Why did they leave the country?

  4. How did she become involved in AFL?

  5. What is Zimra’s favourite part of the game?

  6. What did some kids have a few questions about when she started playing the game?

  7. Who is her favourite AFL player and which team does he play for?

  8. Who is Zimra’s biggest fan?
  9. Write a message to Zimra and post it in the comments section on the story page.


  10. How did this story make you feel?

Do the quiz on the BtN website.

Young Inventors


  1. Briefly summarise the BtN Young Inventors story.

  2. What well-known inventions were created by kids?

  3. Which competition did the kids in the story win?

  4. Describe Brigette’s invention.

  5. Why did she come up with her invention?

  6. What was Kern’s big idea?

  7. What is unique about Kern’s sprinkler?

  8. Why is he excited about visiting NASA?

  9. What invention could you not do without? Explain why.

  10. If you could invent something what would it be?

Check out the Young Inventors resource on the Teachers page


T
Episode 32

15th November 2016

eacher Resource

Air Pollution




Students will investigate some key questions they have about air pollution and the impact it has.






Science – Years 5 & 6

Scientific knowledge is used to solve problems and inform personal and community decisions (ACSHE083) (ACSHE100)

Science – Year 6

The growth and survival of living things are affected by the physical conditions of their environment (ACSSU094)

Geography – Year 7

The influence of environmental quality on the liveability of places (ACHGK045)


  1. In your own words, explain what air pollution is.

  2. What is smog?

  3. What causes air pollution?

  4. How is air pollution measured?

  5. Finish the following sentence: The air was so bad that India’s government decided to…

  6. What health problems can air pollution cause?

  7. Why are young people particularly vulnerable?

  8. About how many children around the world are breathing dangerous air?

    1. 100 million

    2. 200 million

    3. 300 million

  9. What can be done to reduce air pollution?

  10. Name three facts you learnt watching the Air Pollution story.




Class discussion

Discuss the BtN Air Pollution story and use the following questions to guide the discussion:





  • What’s in the air? (Mixture of gases – what are they?)

  • What is air pollution?

  • What causes air pollution?

  • What impact can air pollution have? (health of humans, the environment – plants and animals)

  • Why impact can air pollution have on children?

  • What is the air quality like in Australia? What human activities impact on air quality in Australia?

Glossary

Develop a glossary of words and terms that relate to air pollution. Below are some words to get you started. Add words and meanings to your glossary as you come across unfamiliar words throughout your research. Consider using pictures and diagrams to illustrate meanings.



Oxygen

Atmosphere

Pollutants

Molecule

Pollution

Emissions

Smog

Air toxics



Students will investigate in more depth some questions they have about air pollution and the impact it has.


Define: What do I want to know?

    Key questions to research

Students can choose one or more of the following questions or come up with their own:

  • What are the types of air pollution?

  • What causes air pollution?

  • What are the consequences of air pollution?

  • How can the air pollution be reduced?

  • How does air pollution impact on the liveability of a place?



Locate: Where do I find the information?

What resources will help answer my questions? (Internet, people, resource centre, organisations, print). Discuss with students what a reliable source is.


Select: What information is important for the investigation?

Students may need support to sort through and select relevant information.



Organise: How do I make sense of the information?

Students can organise their research by creating main headings from their questions. Write each heading on a separate piece of paper. Record the information found for each question.



Present: How do we let others know about this information?

Students need to decide on the best way to present the information. Possibilities could include:





  • A multi- media presentation

  • An Infographic

  • An oral report

  • A website using Weebly

Evaluate: What have we learnt?

Students reflect on what they have learnt about air pollution during their investigation and respond to the following:





  • What I learned...

  • What I found surprising...

  • How my thinking changed…







Create a Quiz

Use Kahoot! to test students’ knowledge about air pollution. Quizzes can be created to recap learning or test personal knowledge. There is also the option to connect with classrooms around the world and play kahoot in real time.



ABC News – Delhi closes schools, halts construction to tackle pollution
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-06/delhi-shuts-schools-halts-construction-to-tackle-pollution/7999224

ABC News – New Delhi smog selfies show `poison’ covering city


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-07/smog-selfies-show-new-delhi's-air-pollution/8001386

ABC News – Almost one in seven children suffer due to high air pollution, UNICEF says


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-31/one-in-seven-children-suffer-high-air-pollution:-unicef/7980712

National Geographic – Air Pollution


http://nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/air-pollution/

T
Episode 32

15th November 2016

eacher Resource



Young Inventors




Students will learn more about inventions created by young people and design their own invention.





Science – Years 5 & 6

Scientific knowledge is used to solve problems and inform personal and community decisions (ACSHE083) (ACSHE100)

With guidance, pose clarifying questions and make predictions about scientific investigations (ACSIS231) (ACSIS232)

Reflect on and suggest improvements to scientific investigations (ACSIS091)

 (ACSIS108)
Science – Year 7

Solutions to contemporary issues that are found using science and technology, may impact on other areas of society and may involve ethical considerations (ACSHE120)
People use science understanding and skills in their occupations and these have influenced the development of practices in areas of human activity (ACSHE121)


  1. Briefly summarise the BtN Young Inventors story.

  2. What well-known inventions were created by kids?

  3. Which competition did the kids in the story win?

  4. Describe Brigette’s invention.

  5. Why did she come up with her invention?

  6. What was Kern’s big idea?

  7. What is unique about Kern’s sprinkler?

  8. Why is he excited about visiting NASA?

  9. What invention could you not do without? Explain why.

  10. If you could invent something what would it be?





After watching the BtN Young Inventors story, respond to the following questions:

frame6
Working in pairs, ask students to discuss and respond to the following questions:

  • Who is an inventor?

  • What do they do?
  • Can anyone be an inventor? Why or why not?


  • What do you know about the process of inventing?

  • What things might inventors have to do and think about in order to invent something?

  • What scientific discoveries or inventions have impacted on your life?

  • What invention could you not do without? Why?



Students watch the BtN Aussie Inventions story to find out more about significant Australian inventions then answer the following questions:


  1. Name one of the inventions in the BtN story.

  2. What is a prototype?

  3. Why was the scientific invention of the cochlear implant so important?

  4. Do you think anyone can be an inventor? Why or why not?

  5. Can you think of any other Aussie inventions that weren’t mentioned on the BtN story?

  6. Illustrate one of the inventions you learnt about in the BtN Aussie Inventions story.

  7. Create a timeline highlighting Aussie inventions over the last 100 years.




Young Inventors
Students will explore in more detail the winning inventions of the Little Big Idea competition. They can investigate all three inventions or choose one to find out more about.




Brigette’s Band Aid Dispenser

Watch the short video about Brigette’s invention and respond to the following:



  • Briefly describe the invention.

  • What inspired Brigette’s invention?

  • How does it work?

  • What materials is it made from?

  • What problem does it solve?

  • What is unique about the design?

  • What questions do you have about the invention?





Dylan’s Food Recycling App
Watch the short video about Dylan’s invention and respond to the following:


  • Briefly describe the invention.

  • What inspired Dylan’s invention?

  • How does it work?

  • What materials is it made from?

  • What problem does it solve?

  • What is unique about the design?

  • What questions do you have about the invention?



Kern’s Smart Sprinkler
Watch the short video about Kern’s invention and respond to the following:


  • Briefly describe the invention.

  • What inspired Kern’s invention?

  • How does it work?

  • What materials is it made from?

  • What problem does it solve?

  • What is unique about the design?

  • What questions do you have about the invention?


The BtN Young Inventors story talked about some well-known inventions created by kids. Students can research one of these or and Australian invention. The BtN Aussie Inventions story or the Australian Geographic website has some examples. Students can use the following questions to help guide their research:



  • Why did the object first come about? Was it intentional or accidental?

  • What problem or issue does the invention overcome or solve?

  • Who was the inventor?

  • When was the object invented?

  • How does the invention work?

  • How has it changed or affected people’s lives?

  • What if the object was never invented?


Further Investigation

Students can design their own invention or make a modification to an invention (to improve the design or function of a product). Ask students to:





  • Name their invention

  • What problem does it solve?

  • How does it work?

  • What materials is it made from?

  • What is unique about the design?

  • Draw a picture of their invention



Behind the News – Aussie Inventions



http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3603131.htm
Little Big Idea – Need Some Inspiration?

https://www.littlebigidea.com.au/index.html#needsomeinspiration
Australian Geographic – Australian Inventions that changed the world

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/history-culture/2010/06/australian-inventions-that-changed-the-world/
Australia.gov – Australian Inventions
http://www.australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/austn-inventions

BtN: Episode 32 Transcript 15/11/16

Hello, I'm Nathan and this is BtN.
Coming up today:


  • We travel to India to meet the school kids trying to learn in polluted air.




  • How one small town was saved by inviting refugees to move there.




  • And the young inventors changing the world one idea at a time.

New President

Reporter: Nic Maher
INTRO: But first to the big news. President-elect, Donald Trump. In a result very few predicted Americans have elected a businessman and former reality star as the 45th President of the United States. Let's find out more about him and ask you how you feel about his win.

He's the reality TV star known for having lots of money and even more confidence. But now he's set for his biggest challenge: becoming the President of the United States.



Something very few people saw coming.
But, now it's happened, many of you have told us you're feeling a bit concerned about what might happen next.
STUDENT: I did go home with mum and dad and I started watching it as well after he actually won and yeah, I thought it was crazy.
STUDENT: Every time Hillary was in front it was like 'yeah, Hillary. Oh, wait, no, it's Trump again, oh no!'
But what might a Trump presidency actually look like for the U.S and the rest of the world? To work that out, it helps to know more about the man who will be named president in just a few months’ time.
Trump was born in 1946 into a very rich family. He studied economics in college and once finished, his dad gave him a huge amount of money to help kick-start his career in property development. Since then, he's built casinos, offices, hotels and golf courses around the world.
Trump has always enjoyed the spotlight, and throughout the campaign he regularly made headlines, by saying controversial and sometimes very negative things about women and people of other races and religions.

Some of the promises he made during the campaign made a lot of people angry as well, like his idea to build a wall between the US and Mexico to keep out illegal immigrants or banning Muslim people from entering the United States.

So, how did he end up winning? Well, lots of Americans say they don't think their politicians are very effective or trustworthy. So, they wanted change. Trump supporters saw Donald as a way of making that happen, because he's never been in politics before. And because he's already really rich he didn't have to rely on donations from big companies to get there, so, they think he'll be more independent.
Another big factor in Trump's election, is that lots of people in rural America say they're feeling forgotten. So, throughout the campaign, Trump promised to help these areas and stop a lot of their jobs moving overseas.
Around the world, many people are wondering how Donald Trump's leadership might affect them too. Some say it's likely he'll make international trade more expensive. Others say he'll reduce the amount of money the US spends fighting climate change.
But while some things might change over time, experts say there's nothing for kids to worry about right now. Many world leaders say Trump deserves to be given a chance.
BARACK OBAMA, US PRESIDENT: We are now all rooting for his success in uniting and leading the country.
And Trump himself says he's going to work hard to bring all Americans together.
DONALD TRUMP, US PRESIDENT-ELECT: I pledge to every citizen of our land that I will be President for all Americans.
So, what would your advice be for the new President-elect?
STUDENT: My advice to Donald Trump would be to think before he speaks and makes promises.
STUDENT: I think that he should show a bit more respect to Muslims, people of other races and genders.
STUDENT: Keep free trade because otherwise you're not going to get much stuff in America and it's going to be harder to export stuff.
STUDENT: To stay strong and be a positive role model.
STUDENT: To keep making jobs for Americans.
STUDENT: Just to be a better person.
Poll

And we'd like to know how you feel about Donald Trump's election too. Let us know what you think on our website.

This Week in News
To other big stories of the week now and a really powerful earthquake hit New Zealand's South Island on Sunday night. It struck about 90 kays out of Christchurch but was felt as far away as the country's North Island. Two people died, buildings and roads were damaged and there were hundreds of strong aftershocks too.
A lot of people were left feeling pretty shaken.

Back home the Australian Government has announced a refugee settlement deal with the US for the people currently held in detention centres on Nauru and Manus Island.
The one-off deal will mean many of the refugees living on those islands will now be offered resettlement in the United States.
But critics say the deal could all fall through after Donald Trump becomes President in January.

There's been some good news for the students of Yarloop. Last week we told you about the WA school that was closed after a massive fire destroyed most of the town.
The students were told it wouldn't re-open next year so they started protesting. But now the state's education minister says the school will be reopen next year after all.
Students say they're really happy they'll soon be going back to the school they love.

And this year's funniest wildlife photos have been announced. The Comedy Wildlife Awards were set up by a conservation group to celebrate the not so majestic side of nature. And this year there were more than 2000 entries! The overall winner was this spectacular fox nose-dive.


A lucky shot of an unlucky pelican took out the animals in the air category. And the underwater prize went to this fish slapping another fish in the face.
Air Pollution

Reporter: Amelia Moseley

INTRO: Okay next up. Imagine if your school had to close because the air outside was too polluted to breathe. That's what happened in India's capital New Delhi recently. Students and teachers there have since petitioned the government to do something about it. But they aren't the only kids in the world struggling to breathe safely.

It's all around you; you can't really see it, or smell it, and even though it keeps you alive, in Australia you probably don't think about it that much!
But if you lived in a city like this one - the air would be a whole lot more noticeable. This is Delhi, the capital of India. It's the fifth most populated city on the planet and it's one of the most polluted. The smog you can see here is a mixture of fog, smoke and other air pollution. It comes from dust, cars, burning fossil fuels like coal, burning waste and recently even fireworks let off for Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights.
Air pollution is measured by how many harmful particles are floating around and it doesn't take many of them to start making air toxic. The World Health Organisation has set levels that it considers still safe for people to breathe, but lately Delhi's air pollution levels have risen to 90 times past that safe point. The air was so bad that India's government decided to close 1,800 schools for three days, halted all construction and warned people to stay indoors for their own safety.
SHEFALI VERMA, DELHI RESIDENT: The children are locked behind doors, prisoners behind their masks.
SHUNIL JUNEJA, DELHI RESIDENT: I've been a citizen of Delhi for 30 years. Never, never have I felt this way.
When people breathe in too many polluted particles it can cause serious, even life-threatening, health conditions like lung diseases, and young people are particularly vulnerable because their bodies are still growing.
PANKAJ, STUDENT: It causes a lot of difficulty in breathing. When I go for my morning walks these days, I realise that the air pollution levels have increased a lot.
Many students and teachers in Delhi took to the streets wearing masks to protest for India's government to do more to protect people.

IMAN, 12-YEAR-OLD STUDENT: I'm here to fight for my right to breathe, I feel imprisoned at home because of health advisories that I can't go out without a mask. So, I think it's high time we realised we need to do something about pollution in Delhi.

But Delhi isn't the only city in the world where the hazy air is a big problem. These maps show where air pollution is worst. It's mostly in developing countries and in many places it's on the rise. The UN children's fund says about 300 million kids, or one in seven in the world are breathing dangerous air. It's not just outside air pollution that's harmful. In many developing countries, people burn coal and wood inside their homes to cook or keep warm and end up breathing in the particles.
But a lot of countries, including India, have been working to try to reduce their air pollution levels. Some have banned people from driving old, polluting cars - encouraging them to buy clean, green ones instead - or they're trying to reduce the total number of cars on the road. Others are making renewable energy a priority.
It's still going to take some time, but it's hoped one day governments can help clear the air for kids everywhere.
Ask a Reporter
Have you got a question about air pollution? Ask me live on Friday during Ask a Reporter! Head to our website for all the details.
Quiz
And it's also time for our first quiz. Air pollution is often measured in 'ppm'. What do those letters stand for?
Parts Per Million
Pollution Per Mile
Or Pickle Party Mascot
The answer - Parts Per Million

Rural Refugees

Reporter: Jack Evans
INTRO: Next up, in some rural areas, communities are gradually shrinking and dying out as residents move into the city. But recently the people of Mingoola in New South Wales hatched a plan to reverse that by encouraging refugee families to move there. And now they say it's revitalised the town.
These guys feel like they've finally found home in the small country town of Mingoola.
KID: Small buildings and big backyards.
KID: Friendly, everyone is friendly.

KID: Everyone is friendly and you get to ride horses.

But the story of how these guys came to live in this small town actually starts all the way over in Central Africa. These guys grew up there in rural areas with their families. But they were forced to leave when war and violence made it too dangerous for them to stay. So they applied to become refugees and soon after they arrived in Australia and settled into city life. But adapting to such a big change wasn't easy.

EMMANUAL MUSONI, COMMUNITY ADVOCATE: Most of the people from my communities are really grateful to live in Australia. But many of them find it difficult when they get here.
NADINE SHEMA, COMMUNITY ADVOCATE: Around 80 per cent of resettled refugees from our communities come from agriculture backgrounds. They were really missing it.
Meanwhile a small town on the border between NSW and QLD was having some problems of its own.
CHRISTINE DENIS, MINGOOLA RESIDENT: Mingoola for lots of years has been an ageing community so we've got lots of older people but we don't have many younger people and the community is poorer without them.
In fact, there were so few kids left in town the local school had to be shut down. But locals wanted to change that, so they got together and decided to offer some abandoned cottages in the town to refugee families.
JULIA HARPHAM, MINGOOLA RESIDENT: There's one man who came and he found the landscape very close to his landscape in the Congo. He just stood there with the cattle and then he said, "This has healed my soul".
Since then three families have moved to Mingoola. They work and live in the community and now that there's more kids in town the school’s open again.

JULIA HARPHAM, MINGOOLA RESIDENT: The first day of second term this year the school re-opened its doors for the new family that had arrived. And it was very exciting for all of us.

STUDENT: Hi. We are Mingoola school. We are very unique. Last term it was closed but I'm glad it's not because we do lots of fun learning.
Today locals reckon things are going pretty well. Some residents even think rural towns should follow their lead.
CHRISTINE DENIS, MINGOOLA RESIDENT: We've got this mish mash of people, somehow we fit beautifully together.
Meanwhile Mingoola’s newest residents are just thankful for the warm welcome they've received.

JONATHAN KANANI: The people of Mingoola is good people, friendly people, lovely people. I don't know how I can say about the things that they do for us. I can't describe that.

FAINESS KABURA: It's like a family.
JONATHAN KANANI: Yeah.
Refugee AFL Program

Reporter: Jack Evans


INTRO: Now as you saw there some refugee families can feel quite isolated when they arrive here to live. So next we're heading to Queensland where a new AFL coaching program has been created to help young refugees feel more connected to their community. It's already been hailed a success by AFL representatives and community leaders. But one amazing young girl sees it as more than just fun. She sees it as her ticket to the big time.
She's known as the Afghani Axe! Tearing up and down the field, breaking through the pack and kicking goals! So it's hard to believe that just two years ago 10-year-old Zimra had never even heard of AFL, let alone picked up a footy!
ZIMRA: I had no idea what it was and I had no idea how to kick the ball.
Zimra and her family left Afghanistan in 2014, because it became too dangerous there. They ended up settling in Toowoomba, Queensland, as refugees.
Zimra learnt about AFL when she joined a program run by her local church. It teaches refugee kids to play the game and helps them make new friends.
ZIMRA: It was really good meeting lots of other people and different kinds of people, they were really friendly and encouraging. I'm more confident than I was before.
It didn't take long for Zimra to work out her favourite part of the game!
ZIMRA: When I saw it was tackling, rough game I started liking it. It's good playing with boys, yeah you tackle them hard and you're rough with them!
When she started playing, some kids did have a few questions about her hijab, but Zimra was happy to fill them in.

ZIMRA: It was a little bit weird for them. But they were asking me what is it and then I said it was a part of our culture, and yeah, they were like are you hot in this and I'm like nah I'm not. They used to it now!

Now she plays as a midfielder in the region's representative squad and she’s become a bit of a self-confessed footy fanatic!
ZIMRA: My favourite team is Adelaide Crows, I like them cause of Eddie Betts, he's really good, he's like a magician - he can kick goal from anywhere! I just love him, he's my ideal.
Zimra's even attracted the attention of AFL scouts who reckon she could have a bright future in the game.
KEITH WEBB, AFL REGIONAL MANAGER: She's obviously very talented. She's one of the young athlete's coming through who just lives and breathes the game.
ZIMRA: I wanna play in my future and I wanna be professional, so I have to work hard to get that level.
No matter what happens, Zimra will always have her biggest fan on the sidelines. Even if that fan hasn't quite worked out the rules yet!
ZIMRA'S MUM: When they shout, I say did this call ball and he says yeah they call ball or make point and I say ok then I cheer, but I still don't understand the game!
For now, Zimra plans to keep working towards her goal of kicking goals! And hanging out with her friends on the field.
ZIMRA: It means a lot to me, I just love playing it. I love running and yeah it's my passion.

Quiz 2
Quiz number 2 now.


How many people play Aussie Rules football in Australia?
200,000
800,000
or 1.2 million
The Answer is: 1.2 million

Sport

Essendon Player Jobe Watson has handed back his 2012 Brownlow Medal given to the AFL's best and fairest. Watson was one of the club's 34 players found guilty of doping that season. And he's just come back from serving a 12-month suspension. There's been a lot of talk lately about whether he should be allowed to keep it but he decided giving it back was the right thing to do.

Next to an update on the women's AFL comp. Players are set to get their first pay bump even though the comp hasn't even started yet! Originally the minimum pay was set at $5000 a season but now it's been raised to $8500. The change came after months of negotiations between the players and the AFL. The new deal also includes footy boots and runners, a travel allowance and a carer's allowance for players who have a baby.


Matildas players Caitlin Foord and Lisa de Vanna have been nominated for the Asian Soccer Player of the Year award. It's a prestigious award given out by the Asian Football Confederation. Foord and de Vanna were really important to the Matildas success in the qualifiers for the Rio Olympics.
And we'll find out in December if either one has won.

And things took a dark turn in the NBL this week, literally.
With just a minute to go in the match between Brisbane and Cairns a citywide blackout knocked out the lights! The game had to be abandoned and Brisbane were awarded the win thanks to their 8-point lead at the time.
Cairns were pretty dark on the decision but the NBL refused to flick the switch for a replay.

Young Inventors

Reporter: Jack Evans
INTRO: Okay finally today. Some Aussie kids will soon be heading to NASA in the US after being named the winners of a national competition for young inventors. Here's a look at two of this year's winners and their amazing ideas.
Over the years, kids have come up with some pretty cool inventions - like the trampoline, earmuffs, ice blocks, even the braille system and now some new inventions can be added to that list.
BRIDGETTE: it makes me feel amazing! I never thought I could win the prize.
Bridgette was one of the winners of the Little Big Idea competition which aims to inspire young inventors to get creating. Her invention is a band aid dispenser, kind of like a sticky tape dispenser but for band-aids.
BRIDGETTE: So the casing can open and the push button closes it and opens it. It's got a blade right here to rip band-aid straight off.
Bridgette has leukaemia, so for the past year she's needed a lot of blood tests. And, after watching her mum struggle to open band aids each time she came up with the band aid dispenser as a way to make things a little easier for her.

Kern was another one of this year's winners.

KERN: I still can't believe it, yeah it's amazing.
And his Big Idea was to find a more water-wise way of watering his garden.
KERN: I was riding my bike along our footpath and I was wet from a sprinkler and I wanted to find a solution to stop water wastage.
So he came up with the smart sprinkler.
KERN: So how it works is a person walks around the boundary of your grass or garden with an infra-red remote control and the smart sprinkler detects the remote control and maps the area in its memory and then as it sprays water it changes its tilt arm to spray the boundary of the garden instead of wasting water onto footpaths.
As part of their prize, these inventive kids will be jetting off to the US where they'll visit NASA to see some other cool inventions and inventors.
KERN: I'm really excited about going to NASA to see how the astronomers research space and the solar system.
And they're hoping it'll inspire them to continue thinking up big ideas in the future.

Closer
And that's it for today! But as always there is more to see on our website including teacher resources and plenty of classroom activities. Stay well and bye for now.




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