October 2008 to September 2009



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Agenda Item No: 14

Safer Stockton Partnership

9 February 2010



October 2008 to September 2009







AUTHOR

Anna Clark – Community Safety Analyst

DATE

January 2010







This document has been produced for the purpose of strategic priority setting to reduce crime and disorder in the borough of Stockton. No part of this document maybe copied or amended without prior consultation with the author named above or the Community Safety Manager.



RESTRICTED


TABLE OF CONTENTS




  1. INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………………………………………………. page 2




  1. PERFORMANCE……………………………………………………………………………………………. page 3




  1. VICTIMS……………………………………………………..……………………………….……………… page 8

3.1. Victim summary

3.2. Victim data requirements




  1. OFFENDER………………………………………………………………………………………………….. page 17

4.1. Offender summary

4.2. Offender data requirements



  1. LOCATION………………………………………………………………………………………………....... page 23

3.1. Location summary

3.2. Location data requirements


  1. RECOMMENDATIONS…………………………………………………………………………………….. page 30




  1. APPENDICES……………………………………………………………………………………………… page 31




  • Appendix 1 - Partners of the Safer Stockton Partnership

  • Appendix 2 - List of data sources

  • Appendix 3 - Action Plan from Partnership Strategic Assessment 2008

  • Appendix 4 - Activities and Initiatives

  • Appendix 5 - Crime rates by ward

  • Appendix 6 - Variance between perceptions and crime and ASB levels

  • Appendix 7 - Neighbourhood Policing Priorities

1. INTRODUCTION

This is the third annual Partnership Strategic Assessment produced by the Safer Stockton Partnership (SSP). The purpose of the document is to provide the Partnership with an overview of the current crime, disorder and anti social behaviour (ASB) issues in Stockton, as well as taking into account the harm caused by misuse of drugs and alcohol. It will be used by the Partnership to consider if the current key priorities are still relevant and if any emerging issues need to be included as strategic priorities for 2010/11. A summary of this document will be published in the forthcoming Crime & Disorder Audit 2010. It is not intended to provide detailed analysis of each crime type or issue; rather it is a tool for strategic decision makers and should support the problem solving approach of the partnership by identifying knowledge gaps where further analytical products, such as problem profiles, need to be commissioned. Intelligence products and performance monitoring documents that have been produced within the strategic period will be used to inform the assessment.

During this strategic period the Safer Stockton Partnership merged with the Drugs and Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) and they are now both known under the SSP banner and have joint meetings to reduce bureaucracy. A full list of all partners can be found in appendix 1. The Partnership Strategic Assessment should be read in conjunction with the Drugs and Alcohol Needs Assessments when considering the future strategic priorities for the Partnership. It is also important to consider the findings from the Strategic Assessments produced by Stockton Police, Cleveland Fire Brigade, as well as the Young Persons Substance Misuse Needs Assessment produced by the Children and Young Peoples Strategy Group. Summary information from each of these documents is included in this report.
The assessment will look at data from 1st October 2008 to 30th September 2009 wherever possible, and is based around the three key elements of the Problem Analysis Triangle:


  • Victims / Vulnerable People / Targets

  • Offenders

  • Locations

This triangle was borne out of the environmental criminological theory Routine Activity Theory devised by Felson & Cohan. The overarching premise is that for a crime to occur there must be a suitable target, the lack of a suitable guardian and a motivated offender that all come together in space and time. By analysing each element in turn it is the problem, rather than the outcomes of these problems e.g. crime types, which is assessed.



  • The victim section considers who is most vulnerable, what properties are vulnerable, what products are most craved, the extent of repeat victimisation in the Borough and also assesses the perceptions of residents and levels of public confidence.





  • The offender section tries to identify who commits crime, disorder and ASB and how prolific those offenders are, as well as considering their motivations for offending. It will also assess detection levels and what happens to offenders once they are caught.




  • The location section identifies the most vulnerable locations in the Borough and those that need the most reassurance by looking at perception data. It looks at hotspots of crime, disorder and ASB and also considers the temporal aspects of these issues. Consideration will also be given to where our victims and offenders live.

This report has been produced by the Community Safety Analyst Anna Clark on behalf of SSP. Acknowledgments are given to all the responsible authorities and other key partners who have provided data for the assessment. A full list of data sources can be found in appendix 2. In particular, thanks are given to the Tees Valley Joint Strategy Unit, Lisa Lyons (Senior Intelligence Analyst, Cleveland Police), Gemma MacDonald (Business Intelligence Analyst, DAAT), Joanne Heaney (Modernisation Manager, DAAT), Lynne Massam (Modernisation Manager, Young People's Substance Misuse), Marie Lee (Intelligence Analyst, Cleveland Fire Brigade), Julie Dinsdale (Information Officer, Stockton YOS).


Please note that due to this report containing sensitive information it has been classified as RESTRICTED. Any member of the Partnership who wishes to use data contained within the document should first check with the author and the data source owner.




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