P. O. Drawer dx mississippi Department of Education Mississippi State, ms 39762 P. O. Box 771 662. 325. 2510 Jackson, ms 39205



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2014 Healthcare and Clinical Services

Mississippi Department of Education
Program Code 51.0000  Health Services/Allied Health/Health Sciences, General.
Direct inquiries to
Instructional Design Specialist Program Coordinator

Research and Curriculum Unit Office of Career and Technical Education

P.O. Drawer DX Mississippi Department of Education

Mississippi State, MS 39762 P.O. Box 771

662.325.2510 Jackson, MS 39205

601.359.3461


Published by
Office of Career and Technical Education

Mississippi Department of Education

Jackson, MS 39`205
Research and Curriculum Unit

Mississippi State University

Mississippi State, MS 39762

Betsey Smith, Curriculum Manager

Scott Kolle, Project Manager

Jolanda Harris, Educational Technology Specialist

The Research and Curriculum Unit (RCU), located in Starkville, MS, as part of Mississippi State University, was established to foster educational enhancements and innovations. In keeping with the land grant mission of Mississippi State University, the RCU is dedicated to improving the quality of life for Mississippians. The RCU enhances intellectual and professional development of Mississippi students and educators while applying knowledge and educational research to the lives of the people of the state. The RCU works within the contexts of curriculum development and revision, research, assessment, professional development, and industrial training.

Table of Contents



Acknowledgments 3

Standards 5

Preface 6

Executive Summary 7

Course Outlines 10

Research Synopsis 12

Professional Organizations 17

Using this Document 21

Unit 1: Course Orientation, Safety Review, Clinical Policies, and Employability 22

Unit 2: Emergency Services and Technical Skills 23

Unit 3: Human Growth and Development 26

Unit 4: Rehabilitative Services 27

Unit 5: Medical and Nursing Services 29

Unit 6: Therapeutic Services 32

Unit 7: Pharmacological and Diagnostic Services 34

Unit 8: Information Technology and Health Informatics 36

Student Competency Profile 38

Appendix A: Unit References 40

Appendix B: Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Skills 41

Appendix C: Industry Standards 43

Appendix D: 21st Century Skills 49

Appendix E: Common Core Standards 52

Appendix F: National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S) 85


Acknowledgments

The Healthcare and Clinical Services curriculum was presented to the Mississippi Board of Education on March 20, 2014. The following persons were serving on the state board at the time:

Dr. Carey M. Wright, State Superintendent of Education

Dr. O. Wayne Gann, Chair

Mr. Howell “Hal” N. Gage, Vice Chair

Ms. Kami Bumgarner

Mr. William Harold Jones

Dr. John R. Kelly

Mr. Charles McClelland

Mr. Richard Morrison

Mrs. Rosemary G. Aultman

Mr. Simon F. Weir II

Jean Massey, Associate Superintendent of Education for the Office of Career and Technical Education at the Mississippi Department of Education, assembled a taskforce committee to provide input throughout the development of the Healthcare and Clinical Services Curriculum Framework and Supporting Materials.
Suzanne Tribble, PhD., Instructional Design Specialist for the Research and Curriculum Unit at Mississippi State University, researched and authored this framework. suzanne.tribble@rcu.msstate.edu
Also, special thanks are extended to the teachers who contributed teaching and assessment materials that are included in this document:

Lee Ann Rhaly, West Lauderdale High School, Collinsville, MS

Karan Burns, Senatobia-Tate County Career Technical Center, Coldwater, MS

Naomi Jordan, Madison Career & Technical Center, Madison, MS

Martha Stokes, Philadelphia-Neshoba County Career Technical Center, Philadelphia, MS

Melissa Parker, Calhoun County Career and Technical Center, Calhoun City, MS

Susan Siedell, Pascagoula Applied Technology Center, Pascagoula, MS

Judy Dalgo, Ocean Springs Career and Technical Education Center, Ocean Springs, MS

Sharon Murphey, Carl Keen Career and Technical Center, Clarksdale, MS

Rae Hollingsworth, Forest-Scott County Career and Technical, Forest, MS

Julie Owen, Clarke County Career and Technology Center, Quitman, MS

Tammy Creel, McComb Business and Technology Complex, McComb, MS

Brenda White, Simpson County Technical Center, Mendenhall, MS

Mary Slaughter, Madison Career and Technical Center, Madison, MS

Laura Fails, Lamar County Career and Technical Center, Purvis, MS

Kay Berry, Simpson County Technical Center, Mendenhall, MS

Judy Grice, Forrest County AHS, Brooklyn, MS

Shelly Varnon, Pontotoc Ridge Career and Technology Center, Pontotoc MS

Jerri Montgomery, Pontotoc Ridge Career and Technology Center, Pontotoc MS

Appreciation is expressed to the following professional who provided guidance and insight throughout the development process:

Pam Hindman, Program Coordinator, Office of Career and Technical Education and Workforce Development, Mississippi Department of Education, Jackson, MS phindman@mde.k12.ms.us

Standards
Standards are superscripted in each unit and referenced in the appendices. Standards in the Healthcare and Clinical Services Curriculum Framework and Supporting Materials are based on the following:
National Healthcare Skill Standards

The National Healthcare Skill Standards were developed by the National Consortium on Health Science Education (formerly the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education) and WestEd Regional Educational Laboratory West in partnership with educators and health care employers. The standards were developed to inform current and future health care workers, employers, and educators as to what skills and knowledge workers need to succeed.

Common Core State Standards Initiative

The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy. Copyright 2010. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved. States and territories of the United States as well as the District of Columbia that have adopted the Common Core State Standards in whole are exempt from this provision, and no attribution to the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers is required. Reprinted from http://www.corestandards.org/.

National Educational Technology Standards for Students

Reprinted with permission from National Educational Technology Standards for Students: Connecting Curriculum and Technology, Copyright 2007, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), 800.336.5191 (U.S. and Canada) or 541.302.3777 (International), iste@iste.org, www.iste.org. All rights reserved. Permission does not constitute an endorsement by ISTE.



21st Century Skills and Information and Communication Technologies Literacy Standards

In defining 21st-century learning, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills has embraced five content and skill areas that represent the essential knowledge for the 21st century: global awareness; civic engagement; financial, economic, and business literacy; learning skills that encompass problem-solving, critical-thinking, and self-directional skills; and information and communication technology (ICT) literacy.


Preface
Secondary career and technical education programs in Mississippi face many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through increased requirements for mastery and attainment of competency as documented through both formative and summative assessments.

The courses in this document reflect the statutory requirements as found in Section 37-3-49, Mississippi Code of 1972, as amended (Section 37-3-46). In addition, this curriculum reflects guidelines imposed by federal and state mandates (Laws, 1988, Ch. 487, §14; Laws, 1991, Ch. 423, §1; Laws, 1992, Ch. 519, §4 eff. from and after July 1, 1992; Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act IV, 2007; and No Child Left Behind Act of 2001).

Executive Summary

Pathway Description

Healthcare and Clinical Services (HCCS) is a pathway of courses for students in the Health Sciences career cluster. The HCCS pathway includes classroom and hands-on experiences that will provide students with an overview of the health-care field, as outlined according to the Health Science Cluster in the National Career Clusters Framework and the National Consortium on Health Science Education (NCHSE), as well as begin to prepare students for careers in occupations predicted to have a high number of available jobs in the next 10 years, including

careers in nursing services (registered nurse, nurse aide, practical nurse, home health aide), therapeutic services (sports medicine, athletic trainer, dietitian, respiratory therapist), diagnostic services (radiologist, phlebotomist, radiologic tech, sonographer, CT technician, medical lab technician), health informatics (health information technician, medical coder), veterinary services, medical services (optometrist, medical assistant), emergency services, rehabilitative services (physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist) counselors, pharmacists, mental health services (psychologists).

Scheduling and operating more than one course in the same classroom/laboratory with the same teacher is not recommended. In order to enable the teacher to instruct students in skills on a one-on-one basis, the recommended class size is 12-15 students for the first two credits. For students taking the last two credits who are job shadowing, the recommended class size is 10 - 12 students. Please be aware that health care facilities often require a 10 to one student/teacher ratio in order to participate in job shadowing. Having a class that is too large decreases the quality experience that Healthcare and Clinical Services is meant to be for the student.

This program includes a minimum of 100 hours of clinical-type experience to be obtained by the program’s completion. It is recommended to spread these hours out among the length of the program. This clinical-type experience can include: tours of health-care facilities, guest speakers, participation in health fairs or community service, laboratory practice, demonstration in the classroom, and observation or job shadowing experiences in medical facilities.


Industry Certification
By implementing the standards set forth in the Healthcare and Clinical Services pathway, students who successfully master the curriculum should have the necessary skills to take the National Health Science Assessment, which is based on industry-validated performance indicators. In addition, students whose programs meet additional criteria and approval by their respective agencies are prepared to complete the requirements and take the certification test to become a certified nurse aide through a certified nurse aide registry-approved site.

Assessment

The latest assessment blueprint for the curriculum can be found at http://www.rcu.msstate.edu/Curriculum/CurriculumDownload.aspx



Student Prerequisites

In order for students to be able to experience success in the Healthcare and Clinical Services pathway, the following prerequisites are suggested:



  1. Completion of the Health Sciences (Core)

  2. C or higher in English (the previous year)

  3. C or higher in math (last course taken, or the instructor can specify the math)

  4. Instructor approval and a TABE Reading Score of eighth grade or higher

  5. C or higher in biology (or the last course taken as approved by instructor)

or

  1. TABE Reading Score of eighth grade or higher

  2. Instructor approval

or

  1. Instructor approval

Academic Credit

The latest academic credit information can be found at https://www.rcu.msstate.edu/MDE/PathwaystoSuccess.aspx. Once there, click the “Counselor Resources” Tab, then click “Curriculum Enhancement List.” Check this site often as it is updated frequently.


Teacher Licensure

The latest teacher licensure information can be found at http://www.mde.k12.ms.us/educator-licensure.

Professional Learning

If you have specific questions about the content of any of training sessions provided, please contact the Research and Curriculum Unit at 662.325.2510 and ask for an instructional design specialist.

Course Outlines
Option 1—Two One-Carnegie-Unit Courses
This curriculum consists of two one-credit courses, which should be completed in the following sequence:


  1. Healthcare and Clinical Services I—Course Code: 995104


2. Healthcare and Clinical Services II—Course Code: 995105
Course Description: Healthcare and Clinical Services I

The Health Specialties course helps the student establish an understanding of specialty areas within the health care field. Students will be exposed to the theory and application related to careers within health care. This course covers topics such as emergency services, technical skills, and human growth and development. Also covered in this course are rehabilitative services, safety, and employability.

Course Description: Healthcare and Clinical Services II

The Direct Care course will allow students to investigate direct care as a career choice. Students will have the opportunity to discover information about pharmacological and diagnostic services and therapeutic services. This course covers medical and nursing services as well as information technology and health informatics.

Course Name: Healthcare and Clinical Services I — Course Code: 995104

Unit Number

Unit Name

Hours

1

Course Orientation, Safety Review, Clinical Policies, and Employability

25

2

Emergency Services and Technical Skills

60

3

Human Growth and Development

25

4

Rehabilitative Services

30

Total




140


Course Name: Healthcare and Clinical Services II— Course Code: 995105

Unit Number

Unit Name

Hours

5

Medical and Nursing Services

50

6


Therapeutic Services

30

7

Pharmacological and Diagnostic Services

40

8

Information Technology, and Health Informatics

20

Total




140



Option 2—One Two-Carnegie-Unit Courses
This curriculum consists of one two-credit course, which should be completed in the following sequence:
Healthcare and Clinical Services— Course Code: 995101
Course Description: Healthcare and Clinical Services

The Healthcare and Clinical Services course helps the student establish insight in the healthcare field. Students will be exposed to the theory and applied tasks related to careers within health care. This course covers topics such as human growth and development, health informatics, information technology, and therapeutic and rehabilitative services. Other topics include medical and emergency services, mental health, and pharmacological and nursing services.


Course Name: Healthcare and Clinical Services — Course Code: 995101

Unit Number

Unit Name


Hours

1

Course Orientation, Safety Review, Clinical Policies, and Employability

25

2

Emergency Services and Technical Skills

60

3

Human Growth and Development

25

4

Rehabilitative Services

30

5

Medical and Nursing Services

50

6

Therapeutic Services

30

7

Pharmacological and Diagnostic Services

40

8

Information Technology, and Health Informatics

20

Total




280

Research Synopsis


Introduction

The Healthcare and Clinical Services pathway covers the broad field of occupations related to health care and medicine. Health care is the largest and fastest growing industry in the United States. The health care field alone will generate more new jobs in the coming years than any other industry, largely in response to rapid growth in the elderly population. In fact, ten of the 20 fastest growing occupations are related to health care. Employment in home-health care and nursing and residential care should increase rapidly as life expectancies rise and families need assistance caring for their elderly family members, thus relying more on long-term care facilities. New technologies will continue to enable earlier diagnoses of many diseases, which often increases the ability to treat conditions that were previously terminal. Industry growth will also occur as a result of the shift from inpatient to less expensive outpatient and home-health care because of improvements in diagnostic tests and surgical procedures, along with patients’ desires to be treated at home. Rapid growth is expected for workers in occupations concentrated outside the inpatient hospital sector, such as pharmacy technicians and personal and home-care aides. Traditional inpatient hospital positions are no longer the only option for many future health care workers.

The Healthcare and Clinical Services Career pathway will target careers at the professional and technical levels in health care. Students enrolled in these courses should be well prepared to pursue degrees at the community college and 4-year-college level.


Needs of the Future Workforce


Description

Current Jobs (2012)

Projected Jobs (2020)

Change (Number)

Change (Percent)

Median Hourly Earning

Anesthesiologists

160

165

5

3.00

$76

Dentists (General)

784

957

173

22.00

$78

Dietician Technicians

166

194

28

17.00

$9

Dieticians/Nutritionists

384


433

49

13.00

$26

Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics

1,595

1,778

183

11.00

$15

Health Diagnosing and Treating Practitioners

178

221

436

24.00

$28

Home Health Aides

4,701

7,359

2,658

57.00

$9

Licensed Practical Nurses

752,300

920,800

168,500

22.00

$19


Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technicians

1,489

1,771

282

19.00

$17

Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants

15,090

18,423

3,333

22.00

$9

Obstetricians and Gynecologists

220

227

7

3.00

$26

Occupational Therapists

961

1,290

329

34.00

$34

Optometrists

245

338

93

38.00


$46

Orthodontists

51

62

11

22.00

$26

Orthotists and Prosthetists

18

25

7

39.00

$41

Pharmacists

591

688

97

16.00

$53

Physical Therapists

1,442

1,976

534

37.00

$35

Physical Therapy Assistant

553

761

208

38.00

$18

Podiatrists


80

90

10

13.00

$25

Recreational Therapists

292

645

53

18.00

$15

Registered Nurses

2,737,400

3,449,300

711,900

26.00

$31

Respiratory Therapists

1,195

1,479

284

24.00

$22

Surgeons

350

361

11

3.00

$26




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