Pendleton Downtown Plan


NOTE: THE COSTS AND TIMETABLES LISTED BELOW ARE FROM THE ORIGINAL SIEGEL PLAN AND DO NOT REPRESENT THE COSTS FOR THE AMENDED PLAN



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NOTE: THE COSTS AND TIMETABLES LISTED BELOW ARE FROM THE ORIGINAL SIEGEL PLAN AND DO NOT REPRESENT THE COSTS FOR THE AMENDED PLAN.


AS WE WORK THROUGH THIS PLAN AND FINALIZE WHAT IS TO BE INCLUDED, COST ESTIMATES WILL BE ADDED TO REFLECT THE AGREED UPON SCOPE OF THE PLAN. WE CAN THEN EXAMINE A VARIETY OF FUNDING OPTIONS.



Planning-Level Cost Estimates


The following preliminary (planning-level) capital cost estimates are based on similar projects completed by other jurisdictions around the time the Downtown Plan was developed. The assumptions and cost breakdowns for each estimate are included in Appendix A.
The cost estimates include unit costs associated with project mobilization, earthwork, grading, roadway striping, masonry, pavement, streetscape amenities, landscaping and irrigation, and a contingency allowance. The costs do not include some enhancements (e.g., public art, plaques, banners, etc.) that could become part of a special community fund raising campaign. A number of factors can influence costs, resulting in costs that are different than those shown here. Such factors include but are not limited to materials, inflation, and geologic, structural and other engineering factors.

Two options for Main Street improvements are included in the plan. Option A is an improved 3-lane configuration and Option B basically adds a “Festival Street” with enhanced concrete work and streetscape amenities between Frazier Avenue and Dorion Avenue. As indicated in Table 7.1, the cost for Main Street improvements is expected to range from approximately $2.9 million for Option A to $4.6 million for Option B. The conversion of SE 1st Street and SW 1st Street to bicycle boulevards with shared lanes, enhanced signage and landscaping improvements is expected to cost an additional $438,000. The total cost of proposed public improvements, including Main Street, SW 1st and SE 1st, Railroad Subdistrict and North and South Umatilla River Subdistrict improvements, is expected to range from approximately $5.8 million (including Main Street Option A) to $7.5 million (including Main Street Option B). It should be noted that these costs are stated in 2011 dollars, and may be adjusted upwards in future years to account for inflation (which typically equates to a 2-4% annual cost increase).

Table 7.1 Preliminary Capital Cost Estimates for Downtown Streetscape Improvements

 

 


Option A

Main St. with 3-Lane Configuration

Option B

Main St. as Festival Street

Main Street

$2,915,251

$4,618,880

SW 1st St. & SE 1st. St.

$438,009

$438,009

S. Main Street Gateway/Railroad District

$498,508

$409,508

S. Umatilla River Subdistrict

$779,407

$779,407

N. Umatilla River Subistrict

$1,188,915

($350k is for water access)



$1,188,915

($350k is for water access)

Total


$5,820,090

$7,523,719

Source: see Appendix A; costs are expressed in 2011 dollar amounts.

Funding Sources and Financing Strategy

Funding Sources


The major existing and potential funding sources are described below. This is followed by a recommended financing strategy and potential funding scenarios. Funding sources that should be targeted considered by the City of Pendleton, Downtown businesses and property owners, and area residents include (but are not limited to):


  • System Development Charges (SDCs) – The city may revisit its SDC methodology and charge structure for transportation, parks and storm water facilities. A new citywide SDC methodology could be created that encourages downtown development and brings in additional funding for roads, pedestrian/bicycle and park facilities. Any new SDC fee increase could be phased in over 2-5 years to mitigate development impacts as the regional and national economy climb out of the recent economic recession. However, potential funding for downtown improvements from SDCs is not expected to be a major source of revenue for several years, even if the streetscape improvements measurably improve vehicular or pedestrian capacity;
  • Local Improvement District (LID)The city should expect downtown property owners that benefit from the planned transportation facility investments to help pay for a portion of the total cost of the improvements though an LID. A downtown LID engineering study could be conducted to create an equitable approach for assessing between $1 and $2 million from downtown property owners over the next 15-20 yearsa specified period of time. The LID could include zones with varying assessment levels to account for benefits that are perceived to vary by location or land use/building/occupant characteristics (e.g., LIDs may exempt upper-floor redevelopment or owner-occupied households);


The use of a local improvement district to fund this plan is not the preferred method of funding, as the enhancements primarily benefit the general public.

  • Urban Renewal District – While the city’s existing Urban Renewal District has little available funding to invest in planned facility improvements, it could become a source of long-term funding to help match non-local loans or grants, especially after additional private investment occurs in the district. Potential funding from this source should be targeted to raise approximately $500,000 over the next 15-20 years;

  • Parking District – The city may opt to establish a parking district in downtown to pay for parking facilities and systems management/maintenance enhancements. Funding revenues for the parking district could be initially obtained by charging downtown businesses, residents, and employees for monthly or annual parking permits to allow for all-day parking in designated locations in the downtown core area. Free parking is recommended for short-term (less than four hours) for downtown visitors and patrons. Parking revenues may also be enhanced thorough special event pricing policies and through citations. This funding source should be targeted to raise approximately $75,000 annually approximately $1 to $1.5 million over the next 15-20 years;
  • Utility Rates - The city may explore establishing a street utility fee, parks utility fee or storm water drainage fee throughout the city. This fee could result in enhanced maintenance revenue but is unlikely to generate significant sources of capital proceeds. The ability to provide new sources of local maintenance funding, could help free up the use of state shared tax revenues from vehicle fuel tax and registration fee formulae proceeds, which could in turn be used to help offset the local cost of financing downtown capital facilities on a pay as you go basis;


  • General Obligation (GO) Bonds or Revenue Bonds – The city could pursue a city-wide “people, parks and places” bond measure that generates adequate funding for all or a portion of the planned downtown streetscape improvements along with other parks and trail improvements throughout the city. These types of bond measures are more successful when they result in “heritage improvements” that benefit residents with strategic parks and pedestrian safety improvements (such as enhanced access to schools and parks);

  • Donations or Corporate Sponsorships – The city could work closely with non-profit foundations, such as the Pendleton Foundation Trust or a newly established non-profit organization to establish tax deductable programs for specific streetscape elements, such as street trees, lighting, and artwork. This type of investment could be targeted to net about $100,000 to $200,000 for project improvements; and

  • Grants – There are a number of state and federal grant programs that the city could pursue to match local funding sources and leverage private investment in downtown. Programs such as the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program and USDA rural community enhancement grants could be targeted to raise about $1 to $1.5 million in upfront capital facilities proceeds.




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