Pitt County Schools 40212cp standard Paideia U. S. History



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Pitt County Schools

40212CP Standard Paideia U.S. History

40215C P Honors Paideia U.S. History

Instructional Guide
Time Frame: First Six Weeks

SCOS GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS, BENCHMARKS, AND SKILLS

ESSENTIAL TASKS, STRATEGIES, PROJECTS, CONNECTIONS

RECOMMENDED RESOURCES AND ASSESSMENT

Unit 1: The New Nation (1789-1820) - The learner will identify, investigate, and assess the effectiveness of the institutions of the emerging republic.

1.01 Identify the major domestic issues and conflicts experienced by the nation during the Federalist Period.

1.02 Analyze the political freedoms available to the following groups prior to 1820: women, wage earners, landless farmers, American Indians, African Americans, and other ethnic groups.

1.03 Assess commercial and diplomatic relationships with Britain, France, and other nations.


Applicable 21st Century Themes:

  • Global Awareness
  • Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy


  • Civic Literacy


Applicable 21st Century Skills:

  • Creativity and Innovation

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

  • Communication and Collaboration

  • Information Literacy

  • Media Literacy

  • ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) Literacy

  • Flexibility and Adaptability

  • Initiative and Self-Direction

  • Social and Cross-Cultural Skills

  • Productivity and Accountability

  • Leadership and Responsibility

To view information on 21st Century Themes and Skills, see: www.21stcenturyskills.org



Essential Questions

  • How did the new U.S. Constitution provide a stable government amid rising political divisions?

  • Was the United States a more democratic nation after its independence?

  • During this period, how does America define its role in international affairs?

Key Concepts

  • Establishment of federal power and supremacy over the states

  • Development of the first two-party system

  • Strict & Loose Interpretation of Constitution

  • Conflicts with American Indians

  • The status of slavery during The Federalist Era

  • The place of women in the society during

  • The disparities between classes in the new nation

  • Early Foreign Policy

  • The failure of peaceful coercion

  • Freedom of the high seas and shipping rights

  • The impact of European events on United States foreign policy

Key Terms


  • Judiciary Act of 1789

  • Bill of Rights

  • Hamilton’s Economic Plan

  • Whiskey Rebellion

  • Democratic-Republican Party

  • Federalist Party

  • Election of 1800

  • “Midnight Judges”

  • Laissez-faire

  • Marbury v. Madison, (1803)

  • John Marshall

  • Louisiana Purchase

  • Alien & Sedition Acts

  • Virginia & Kentucky Resolutions

  • Hartford Convention (1814)

  • Suffrage requirements

  • Tecumseh

  • Cotton Gin

  • Eli Whitney

  • “Necessary Evil”

  • Emancipation

  • Treaty of Greenville 1796

  • XYZ Affair

  • Convention of 1800

  • Impressment of seamen

  • Embargo Act 1807

  • President Washington’s

  • Proclamation Neutrality

  • President Washington’s

  • Farewell Address

  • War Hawks

  • War of 1812

  • Battle of New Orleans

  • Treaty of Ghent

  • Adams-Onis Treaty

  • Jay’s Treaty

  • Pinckney’s Treaty

  • Students enrolled in Honors US History should be prepared to conduct additional independent research projects that require critical thinking and extensive reading and writing
  • 1.01a Draw political cartoons illustrating the different beliefs of the Federalist and Democratic-Republican Parties.


  • 1.01b Complete a “Mystery Documents” exercise. After researching philosophies of Thomas Jefferson & Alexander Hamilton, students are given famous quotes and statements (from primary documents) produced by Jefferson & Hamilton. Discuss quotes and have students identify which quotes Jefferson or Hamilton authored.

  • 1.01c Create campaign posters and speeches supporting Jefferson or Adams during the Election of 1800.

  • 1.01d Research and debate which president was “best” or “Most Effective” (Washington, Adams, Jefferson). Establish criteria for deciding.

  • 1.01e Produce a video “talk show” in which students portray Federalist Era leaders and their philosophies regarding States’ Rights and Federal Power.

  • 1.02a Working in cooperative groups, complete a fishbone diagram analyzing the political freedoms available to women, workers, landless farmers, American Indians, free blacks and slaves during the Federalist Era.

  • 1.02b Contrast American Indian and United States citizens’ cultural views toward land ownership and religion.

  • 1.02c Complete chart and map exercises illustrating how the cotton gin increased the demand for slaves and accelerated settlement of lands occupied by American Indians.

  • 1.02d Develop a list of alternative policies the US government could have used to improve the social conditions of women, African Americans, and American Indians during the Federalist Era. Explain why each alternative would have been accepted or rejected by citizens of the time period. (H)
  • 1.03a Create an illustrated timeline identifying the major foreign policy events of the Federalist Era.


  • 1.03b Design “bumper stickers” protesting or supporting American military action during the XYZ Affair.

  • 1.03c Compare and contrast Washington’s Farewell address to current U.S. foreign policy issues.

  • 1.03d Write letters to the U.S. Congress of 1812 from the perspective of War Hawks or New England Federalists about the pending war.

  • Refer to NCDPI CD-ROM for U.S. History

  • American Anthem Ch. 6

  • History Alive The Constitution & New Nation

  • Honors level assessment should include free-response writing on most tests




Unit 2: Expansion and Reform (1801-1850) - The learner will assess the competing forces of expansionism, nationalism, and sectionalism.

2.01 Analyze the effects of territorial expansion and the admission of new states to the Union.

2.02 Describe how the growth of nationalism and sectionalism were reflected in art, literature, and language.

2.03 Distinguish between the economic and social issues that led to sectionalism and nationalism.

2.04 Assess political events, issues, and personalities that contributed to sectionalism and nationalism.

2.05 Identify the major reform movements and evaluate their effectiveness.

2.06 Evaluate the role of religion in the debate over slavery and other social movements and issues.

Applicable 21st Century Themes:


  • Global Awareness

  • Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy

  • Civic Literacy

  • Environmental Literacy


Applicable 21st Century Skills:

  • Creativity and Innovation

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

  • Communication and Collaboration

  • Information Literacy

  • Media Literacy

  • ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) Literacy

  • Flexibility and Adaptability

  • Initiative and Self-Direction

  • Social and Cross-Cultural Skills

  • Productivity and Accountability

  • Leadership and Responsibility

To view information on 21st Century Themes and Skills, see: www.21stcenturyskills.org



Essential Questions

  • Describe the challenges and lasting impact of manifest destiny.

  • How did transcendentalism assist in developing a national identity?

  • How did industrialization promote both nationalism and sectionalism?

  • Why were reforms needed in American society in the early 19th century?

  • What were the lasting impacts, if any, of these reforms?

  • How does the 2nd Great Awakening propel slavery to the forefront of controversy as a moral, not economic, issue?

Key concepts

  • The rationale for and the consequences of Manifest Destiny

  • Federal Indian policy before The Civil War

  • The political and economic importance of the West
  • Cultural expressions of patriotism


  • Celebrating the common man and the American way of life

  • Influence of the Transcendentalist Movement

  • Transformation of life in the early industrial revolution

  • Cultural polarization of Antebellum America

  • Political agendas of antebellum leaders

  • Concepts of “Jacksonian Democracy”

  • Slave Revolts

  • States’ Rights

  • Era of Good Feelings

  • Women’s Rights

  • Temperance Movement

  • Improvement of social institutions (prisons, mental health, education)

  • Development of Utopian Communities Second Great Awakening

  • Moral Dilemma of Slavery

  • The Abolitionist Movement

Key Terms

  • Missouri Compromise

  • The Indian Removal Act 1830

  • Sequoyah

  • Worchester v. Georgia, 1832

  • Trail of Tears

  • White man suffrage

  • The Alamo

  • Election of 1844

  • Texas Annexation

  • “54-40 or Fight!”

  • Mexican War

  • Wilmot Proviso

  • Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo

  • 49ers

  • Stephen Austin

  • Gadsden Purchase

  • Lewis and Clark

  • Oregon Trail

  • Noah Webster

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • Henry David Thoreau

  • Neoclassical Architecture

  • Washington Irving

  • Edgar Allen Poe

  • Nathaniel Hawthorne

  • James Fennimore Cooper

  • Hudson River School of Artists

  • Alex de Tocqueville


  • Samuel Morse

  • Eli Whitney

  • John Deere

  • Cyrus McCormick

  • Robert Fulton

  • Erie Canal

  • Cotton Kingdom

  • 1st Industrial Revolution

  • Nativism

  • Know-Nothings

  • William Lloyd Garrison

  • Frederick Douglass

  • Henry Clay

  • American System

  • Panic of 1819

  • McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819

  • Election of 1824

  • “corrupt bargain”

  • suffrage

  • spoils system

  • Tariff of Abomination

  • South Carolina Nullification Crisis

  • South Carolina Exposition and Protest

  • Election of 1832

  • Pet Banks

  • Whig Party

  • Election of 1840

  • Nat Turner’s Rebellion

  • Monroe Doctrine

  • Dorothea Dix

  • Horace Mann

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton

  • Lucretia Mott

  • Seneca Falls Convention

  • Sojourner Truth

  • Susan B. Anthony

  • Utopian Communities

  • Brook Farm

  • Oneida

  • New Harmony

  • Rehabilitation

  • Prison Reform

  • William Lloyd Garrison

  • Grimke Sisters

  • David Walker

  • Frederick Douglass

  • Charles G. Finney



  • Students enrolled in Honors US History should be prepared to conduct additional independent research projects that require critical thinking and extensive reading and writing


  • 2.01a Create “Territorial Expansion” jigsaw puzzles. Students can trace and cut out puzzle pieces representing the territorial acquisitions of the lower 48 states on cardboard and write notes on the back of each piece to explain how it was acquired. Exchange puzzles and compare notes.

  • 2.01b Write personal letters to President Polk supporting or protesting the Mexican War.

  • 2.01c Create posters celebrating the advantages of territorial expansion.

  • 2.01d Analyze the painting “Trail of Tears”. See analysis sheet in Section Five. Include visual imagery and feelings.

  • 2.02a Compare images of neoclassical architecture (Monticello, US Capitol, etc.) to examples of Roman structures. How are the lines different?

  • 2.02b View the image of 1836 George Washington statue by Horatio Greenough. Discuss or write analysis of why Americans embraced neoclassical styles.

  • 2.02c View landscape paintings by Thomas Cole and Asher Durand, and genre works by William Sidney Mount, etc. Summarize the images and explain how the works celebrate the spirit of nationalism.

  • 2.02d Compare and contrast the painting “Cotton Plantation” by Giroux and “After The Sale” by Eyre Crowe in the different presentations of slavery in America.

  • 2.02e Allow students to present, in art or literature, examples of how this time period displayed a new sense of nationalism.
  • 202e (H) Have students read Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriett Jacobs or Clotel by William Wells Brown and conduct a Paideia seminar. Write a position paper on the injustices of slavery as outlined in these books.


  • 2.02f What concepts of the Transcendentalist Movement show a change in American society? Make a list and share in groups.

  • 202h (H) Read and participate in a Paideia seminar on one of the works of the Transcendentalists such as “Civil Disobedience.” Debate the concept of civil disobedience and when it can be used for good rather than evil. Analyze the works of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • 2.03a On a US map, indicate economic and technological developments of the time period.

  • 2.03b Use a graphic organizer to show the growing divide between the North and the South in issues of religion, education, and economics.

  • 2.03c Research and analyze the impact of innovations and inventions of the period on American society.

  • 2.03d Write an editorial to a local paper opposing discriminatory practices in hiring, housing, education, etc. during this time period.

  • 2.04a Create a flow-chart analyzing the events that brought an end to the nationalistic “Era of Good Feelings.”

  • 2.04b Describe the following: The Corrupt Bargain of 1824, “Rotation in Office”, Jackson’s Bank Veto. Summarize and explain how these events expanded the American concept of “natural rights”.

  • 2.04c Choose a perspective: “The United States became more democratic or less democratic during the age of Jackson.” Illustrate with a diagram from your perspective.
  • 2.04c (H) Summarize and explain how the events in the Corrupt Bargain of 1824 and “Rotation in Office,” Jackson’s Bank Veto, expanded the American concept of “natural rights.”


  • 2.04e (H) Compare and contrast the Monroe Doctrine to the Bush Doctrine in terms of national security issues facing the United States.

  • 2.05a (H) Create a multimedia presentation depicting a reformer and a reform movement.

  • 2.05b Hypothesize how society would be different today if the reforms of this period had not occurred.

  • 2.05c (H) Hold a “Reform Convention” in which groups of students set up displays on the “reform” of their choice. Establish criteria for the displays and include a theme song.

  • 2.05d Compare and contrast the success of the different reforms of the period. Which ones were most successful? Why? Develop a “How to Succeed in Reforms List.”

  • 2.06a Trace the religious background and activities of major social reformers during the Antebellum Period. Write a position paper that advocates the views of one of these religious leaders.

  • 2.06b Have students find pictures of “tent” meetings or gatherings when circuit ministers visited communities. What common factors are seen in the pictures? Make a list. Discuss.

  • 2.06b (H) Write a position paper that advocates the views of one of the major social reformers during the Antebellum Period.

  • 2.06c Take a work of Garrison and Douglass, highlight any terms that indicate that these men were “spiritually” led to their work. Discuss the terms.
  • 2.06f (H) Read excerpts from the works of David Walker, Nat Turner, Frederick Douglass, and William Lloyd Garrison. Compare and contrast their ideas and solutions to the slavery question.





  • Refer to NCDPI CD-ROM for U.S. History

  • American Anthem Ch. 7,8,9

  • History Alive Manifest Destiny and a Growing Nation

  • Honors level assessment should include free-response writing on most tests




Unit 3: Crisis, Civil War, and Reconstruction (1848-1877) - The learner will analyze the issues that led to the Civil War, the effects of the war, and the impact of Reconstruction on the nation.

3.01 Trace the economic, social, and political events from the Mexican War to the outbreak of the Civil War.

3.02 Analyze and assess the causes of the Civil War.

3.03 Identify political and military turning points of the Civil War and assess their significance to the outcome of the conflict.

3.04 Analyze the political, economic, and social impact of Reconstruction on the nation and identify the reasons why Reconstruction came to an end.

3.05 Evaluate the degree to which the Civil War and Reconstruction proved to be a test of the supremacy of the national government.



Applicable 21st Century Themes:

  • Global Awareness

  • Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy

  • Civic Literacy

  • Health Literacy

  • Environmental Literacy


Applicable 21st Century Skills:

  • Creativity and Innovation
  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving


  • Communication and Collaboration

  • Information Literacy

  • Media Literacy

  • ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) Literacy

  • Flexibility and Adaptability

  • Initiative and Self-Direction

  • Social and Cross-Cultural Skills

  • Productivity and Accountability

  • Leadership and Responsibility

To view information on 21st Century Themes and Skills, see: www.21stcenturyskills.org



Essential Questions

  • Discuss the long term issues that led to the Civil War.

  • Analyze and assess the short term causes of the Civil War.

  • What events could be considered political and military turning points of the Civil War?

  • Assess their significance to the outcome of the conflict. Discuss the effects of the war.

  • Summarize the impact of Reconstruction on the nation.

  • Discuss how the Civil War led to a more centralized government.

Key Concepts

  • The debate on the expansion of Slavery

  • Weak Presidential Leadership

  • Growing Sectionalism

  • Rise of the Republican Party

  • The role of slavery

  • Economics and expansion of the geographic regions

  • Interpretations of the 10th Amendment

  • Immediate causes of the war

  • Key turning points of the war

  • New military technology

  • Strategies of both sides

  • Major political and military leaders

  • European support

  • Executive Powers
  • Resistance to the war effort Effects of Military occupation


  • Limits on presidential and congressional power

  • Development of a new labor system

  • Reconstruction: resistance and decline

  • Enfranchisement and Civil Rights

  • Reorganization of southern social, economic, and political systems Supremacy of The federal government

  • The question of secession

  • Dwindling support for civil rights

Key Terms

  • Anti-slavery movement

  • Slave codes

  • Underground Railroad

  • Harriet Tubman

  • Kansas-Nebraska Act

  • Bleeding Kansas

  • Republican Party

  • Popular Sovereignty

  • Summer-Brooks Incident

  • Freeport Doctrine

  • Lincoln-Douglas Debates

  • Free Soil Party

  • Compromise of 1850

  • Dred Scott v. Sanford, 1857

  • John Brown and Harper’s Ferry

  • Fugitive Slave Act

  • Missouri Compromise

  • Compromise of 1850 Harriet Beecher Stowe

  • Uncle Tom’s Cabin

  • Fugitive Slave Law

  • Election of 1860

  • Secession

  • Fort Sumter, S.C.

  • Abraham Lincoln

  • Jefferson Davis

  • Confederation

  • First Battle of Bull Run/ Manassas

  • John Wilkes Booth

  • Antietam

  • Vicksburg

  • Gettysburg

  • Gettysburg Address

  • Writ of Habeas Corpus

  • Election of 1864

  • William Sherman’s March

  • Anaconda Plan

  • Copperheads
  • Emancipation Proclamation


  • African-American participation

  • Appomattox Court House

  • Robert E. Lee

  • Ulysses S. Grant

  • George McClellan

  • Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson

  • Freedman’s Bureau

  • Radical Republicans

  • Reconstruction plans

  • Thaddeus Stevens

  • Andrew Johnson

  • Compromise of 1877

  • Tenure of Office Act

  • Johnson’s impeachment

  • Scalawags

  • Carpetbaggers

  • Black Codes

  • Ku Klux Klan

  • Sharecroppers

  • Tenant farmers

  • Jim Crow laws

  • The Whiskey Ring

  • Solid South

  • Military reconstruction

  • 13th amendment

  • 14th amendment

  • 15th amendment

  • Civil Rights Act of 1866

  • Election of 1876

  • Compromise of 1877 (repeat)

  • Students enrolled in Honors US History should be prepared to conduct additional independent research projects that require critical thinking and extensive reading and writing

  • 3.01a Using a timeline of 1820-1860, trace and describe the failure of various compromises to reach a solution to the slavery issue.

  • 3.01b Determine ways in which strong executive leadership in the 1850s could have averted the Civil War. Make a list.
  • 3.01c On a map of the U.S., identify the following areas: Slave and Free States, Kansas and Nebraska Territories, areas open to slavery under the terms of the Missouri Compromise, Compromise of 1850, and proposed routes of the transcontinental railroad.


  • 3.01d Compare and contrast Stephen Douglas’ Freeport Doctrine with the Dred Scott decision.

  • 3.01d (H) Have students read the text of the Missouri Compromise, Compromise of 1859, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, excerpts from Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and excerpts from The Impending Crisis of the South, and create a 3-D timeline of 1820-1860 that demonstrates the development of the crisis.

  • 3.01e Develop a graphic organizer that compares and contrasts the Missouri Compromise, the Compromise of 1850, and the Kansas- Nebraska Act.

  • 3.01f Using Bleeding Kansas, John Brown’s Raid at Harper’s Ferry, and the Brooks-Sumner Incident as background, have students determine how these issues were a preview of the coming war.

  • 3.02a Create a chart showing results of the 1860 election. Determine the reasons for Lincoln’s election and project the implications of it.

  • 3.02b Outline the viewpoints of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis in regards to the “UNION”.

  • 3.02c (H) Create a graphic organizer that demonstrates the ways that the principles of States’ Rights have been interpreted by politicians, the Supreme Court, and citizens from 1789-2003.

  • 3.02d (H) Using excerpts from Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Sociology of the South identify arguments used by abolitionists and southerners to denounce and defend slavery.
  • 3.03a On a map of the United States draw and explain the Union’s Anaconda Plan. On the same map identify the “turning point” battles.


  • 3.03b Describe the new military technologies that were developed in the war and describe the effects they had on the war and its outcomes.

  • 3.03c (H) Research the battles of Vicksburg and Gettysburg. In a two-page essay explain why these were turning points.

  • 3.03d Read the Emancipation Proclamation and analyze its effects on slaves in all areas of the nation. Also determine the impact of this document on the war as a whole.

  • 3.03e (H) Determine ways that Lincoln expanded executive powers during the war. Make a list and discuss the legality of each.

  • 3.03f (H) Research, analyze, and summarize ways in which citizens of both sides of the war showed their opposition or support.

  • 3.04a Create a graphic organizer that shows Presidential and Congressional Reconstruction plans.

  • 3.04b Compare and contrast pre-war slave codes with post-war codes.

  • 3.04c (H) Discuss how the Tenure of Office Act violated constitutional separation of powers, and checks and balances.

  • 3.04d (H) Write a two-page essay on the effectiveness of Reconstruction.

  • 3.04e With a triple Venn diagram compare and contrast tenant farming, sharecropping and slavery.

  • 3.04f Discuss ways the South resisted/ supported Reconstruction.
  • 3.05a (H) Divide the class into two groups; one in support of states rights, one in support of federal supremacy. Each group will analyze the historical arguments for their position and present to the class.


  • 3.05b (H) Develop arguments supporting the idea that the Civil War and Reconstruction were the key events in determining the supremacy of the federal government.

  • 3.05c Invite Civil War re-enactors to speak as a panel to the class. Assess the validity of the stories they present. Determine criteria for this evaluation.

  • Refer to NCDPI CD-ROM for U.S. History

  • American Anthem Ch. 10, 11, 12

  • History Alive Civil War and Reconstruction

  • Honors level assessment should include free-response writing on most tests




Unit 4: The Great West and the Rise of the Debtor (1860s-1896) – The learner will evaluate the great westward movement and assess the impact of the agricultural revolution on the nation.

4.01 Compare and contrast the different groups of people who migrated to the West and describe the problems they experienced.

4.02 Evaluate the impact that settlement in the West had upon different groups of people and the environment.

4.03 Describe the causes and effects of the financial difficulties that plagued the American farmer and trace the rise and decline of Populism.

4.04 Describe innovations in agricultural technology and business practices and assess their impact on the West.

Applicable 21st Century Themes:


  • Global Awareness

  • Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy

  • Civic Literacy
  • Environmental Literacy



Applicable 21st Century Skills:

  • Creativity and Innovation

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving

  • Communication and Collaboration

  • Information Literacy

  • Media Literacy

  • ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) Literacy

  • Flexibility and Adaptability

  • Initiative and Self-Direction

  • Social and Cross-Cultural Skills

  • Productivity and Accountability

  • Leadership and Responsibility

To view information on 21st Century Themes and Skills, see: www.21stcenturyskills.org



Key Questions

  • Discuss the different groups of people who migrated to the West and describe the problems they experienced.

  • Discuss the impact of western migration on inhabitants of the west. (Indians and Mexican)

  • Describe the causes and effects of the financial difficulties that plagued the American farmer and trace the rise and decline of Populism.

  • How did technology impact the economy of the west?

Key Concepts

  • Challenges of Westward Movement

  • Motivation for Westward Movement

  • Impact of the Transcontinental Railroad

  • Development of cattle, ranching, and mining industries

  • Mexican influence on the West

  • Western Movement Impact on Indians:

  • Destruction of:

  • Buffalo

  • Reservation

  • System

  • Cattle drives

  • Indian wars

  • Rise and fall of Populism
  • Impact of laws and court cases on the farmer


  • Growing discontent of the farmer

  • Gold Standard vs. Bimetallism

  • Technological improvements on farming

  • Changing nature of farming as a business

  • Increased dependence on the railroads

Key Terms

  • Joseph Smith

  • Brigham Young

  • Mormons

  • Homestead Act

  • Roles of women

  • Roles of African Americans

  • Roles of Chinese

  • Roles of Irish

  • Comstock Lode

  • Morrill Land Grant Act 1862

  • Sod houses

  • Oklahoma Land Rush

  • Dawes Severalty Act

  • Chief Joseph

  • Nez Perce

  • Battle of Little Big Horn

  • Sand Creek Massacre

  • Wounded Knee

  • Helen Hunt Jackson’s

  • Century of Dishonor

  • Buffalo Soldiers

  • Promontory Point, Utah

  • Transcontinental Railroad

  • Irish immigrants

  • Chinese immigrants The Grange

  • National Farmer Alliances

  • Southern Alliance

  • Colored Farmers Alliance

  • Omaha Platform

  • Interstate Commerce Act

  • Rebates

  • William Jennings Bryan

  • “Cross of Gold Speech”

  • Greenbacks

  • Barbed wire

  • Refrigerator car

  • Windmill

  • Farmer’s Cooperatives

  • Steel Plow

  • Vertical/horizontal integration

  • Interlocking directorates
  • Students enrolled in Honors US History should be prepared to conduct additional independent research projects that require critical thinking and extensive reading and writing


  • 4.01a Write letters to your parents explaining your reasons for moving west, the experiences along the way, and the conditions at your new location. Share with class.

  • 4.01b Evaluate the extent to which settlers adapted to the new environment and geography of the West.

  • 4.01c (H) Research the Land Grant Colleges in N. C. and trace their origins to the Morrill Land Grant Act. Present findings using a multimedia presentation.

  • 4.01d Create a chart showing all the groups who went west; why, and the results of their quest.

  • 4.01e Create a campfire setting in the class (brown and red paper), sit around and tell the “Tall Tales” of moving west. Sing songs.

  • 4.02a (H) Review excerpts from historical fiction, selected works of art and/or movie excerpts to compare the romantic vision of the West to the reality of life there.

  • 4.02b Create a pictorial or verbal diary of stories of the Buffalo Soldiers serving in the Indian wars. Share these stories with the class.

  • 4.02c (H) Prove or disprove this quote: ”The American cowboy was actually a dirty, overworked laborer who fried his brains under a prairie sun, or rode endless miles in rain and wind to mend fences or look for lost calves.” The Cowboy, Time Life, p.1

  • 4.02d What evidences of “Western” style exists throughout our culture? Make a list.
  • 4.03a (H) Examine the political cartoon on the Judge Magazine cover of September 1896, “The Sacrilegious Candidate.” Contrast the message of the Cross of Gold Speech with this depiction of Bryan.


  • 4.03b Create a diagram that illustrates the impact of bimetallism on the farmer and the consumer.

  • 4.03c (H)Evaluate the government’s response to the farmer’s complaints with regard to the Munn Case, the Wabash Case, and the Interstate Commerce Act.

  • 4.03d Design a flow chart showing the difference in coined and paper money.

  • 4.03e (H) Outline the political basis of the Populist Party and assess the validity of how these reforms would further democracy and liberties for the common man.

  • 4.03f Hold a town meeting to air the views of different groups - farmers, skilled workers, unskilled workers, business owners, cowboys, ranchers, etc. on passage of the Interstate Commerce Act.

  • 4.04a Compare and contrast the workings of the largest cattle ranches of the west and small farms in eastern states.

  • 4.04b Collect photos and any other representations of the coming of the railroad to the West. Who is in the pictures? Why?

  • 4.04c Create a catalog of the newest tools available to the farmers and ranchers. Compare the catalog to an early mail order catalog of the time period.

  • 4.04d (H) Evaluate the impact of the change in farming and business practices in the west on the American economy.

  • Refer to NCDPI CD-ROM for U.S. History

  • American Anthem Ch. 13

  • History Alive Manifest Destiny and a Growing Nation

  • Honors level assessment should include free-response writing on most tests






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