Place value



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Class Two Curriculum Overviews - Summer Term 2014


Maths

Place value

Comparing, rounding and ordering numbers




Read and write two-digit and three-digit numbers in figures and words; describe and extend number sequences and recognise odd and even numbers, Count up to 100 objects by grouping them and counting in tens, fives or twos; explain what each digit in a two-digit number represents, including numbers where 0 is a place holder; partition two-digit numbers in different ways, including into multiples of 10 and 1, Order two-digit numbers and position them on a number line; use the greater than > and less than < signs, Estimate a number of objects; round two-digit numbers to the nearest 10

Mental methods &

Partitioning


Present solutions to puzzles and problems in an organised way; explain decisions, methods and results in pictorial, spoken or written form, using mathematical language and number sentences, Add or subtract mentally a one-digit number or a multiple of 10 to or from any two-digit number; use practical and informal written methods to add and subtract two-digit numbers, Understand that subtraction is the inverse of addition and vice versa; use this to derive and record related addition and subtraction number sentences, Use the symbols +, −, × , ÷ and = to record and interpret number sentences involving all four operations; calculate the value of an unknown in a number sentence (e.g. ☐ ÷ 2 = 6, 30 − ☐ = 24)


patterns and relationships of numbers

Describe patterns and relationships involving numbers or shapes, make predictions and test these with examples Solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication or division in contexts of numbers, measures or pounds and pence Derive and recall multiplication facts for the 2, 5 and 10 times-tables and the related division facts; recognise multiples of 2, 5 and 10 ,Derive and recall all addition and subtraction facts for each number to at least 10, all pairs with totals to 20 and all pairs of multiples of 10 with totals up to 100 , Understand that halving is the inverse of doubling and derive and recall doubles of all numbers to 20, and the corresponding halves , Use knowledge of number facts and operations to estimate and check answers to calculations

shape and symmetry

Visualise common 2-D shapes and 3-D solids; identify shapes from pictures of them in different positions and orientations; sort, make and describe shapes, referring to their properties, Identify reflective symmetry in patterns and 2-D shapes and draw lines of symmetry in shapes

Measuring and comparing lengths, weights and capacities

Estimate, compare and measure lengths, weights and capacities, choosing and using standard units (m, cm, kg, litre) and suitable measuring instruments, Read the numbered divisions on a scale and interpret the divisions between them (e.g. on a scale from 0 to 25 with intervals of 1 shown but only the divisions 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 numbered); use a ruler to draw and measure lines to the nearest centimetre


Collecting, organising, presenting and interpreting data

Follow a line of enquiry; answer questions by choosing and using suitable equipment and selecting, organising and presenting information in lists, tables and simple diagrams, Answer a question by collecting and recording data in lists and tables; represent the data as block graphs or pictograms to show results; use ICT to organise and present data Use lists, tables and diagrams to sort objects; explain choices using appropriate language, including 'not'


Money and scales

Solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication or division in contexts of numbers, measures or pounds and pence, Add or subtract mentally a one-digit number or a multiple of 10 to or from any two-digit number; use practical and informal written methods to add and subtract two-digit numbers , Read the numbered divisions on a scale, and interpret the divisions between them (e.g. on a scale from 0 to 25 with intervals of 1 shown but only the divisions 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 numbered); use a ruler to draw and measure lines to the nearest centimetre

Time and Direction



Use units of time (seconds, minutes, hours, days) and know the relationships between them; read the time to the quarter hour; identify time intervals, including those that cross the hour, Recognise and use whole, half and quarter turns, both clockwise and anticlockwise; know that a right angle represents a quarter turn, Follow and give instructions involving position, direction and movement

Identifying and recording Solving problems


Identify and record the information or calculation needed to solve a puzzle or problem; carry out the steps or calculations and check the solution in the context of the problem, Present solutions to puzzles and problems in an organised way; explain decisions, methods and results in pictorial, spoken or written form, using mathematical language and number sentences

Multiplication and division with remainders

Represent repeated addition and arrays as multiplication, and sharing and repeated subtraction (grouping) as division; use practical and informal written methods and related vocabulary to support multiplication and division, including calculations with remainders , Use the symbols +, −, ×, ÷ and = to record and interpret number sentences involving all four operations; calculate the value of an unknown in a number sentence (e.g. ☐ ÷ 2 = 6, 30 − ☐ = 24)

Fractions and inverse operations doubles and halving

Understand that halving is the inverse of doubling and derive and recall doubles of all numbers to 20, and the corresponding halves Derive and recall multiplication facts for the 2, 5 and 10 times-tables and the related division facts; recognise multiples of 2, 5 and 10, Find one half, one quarter and three quarters of shapes and sets of objects


English








Different Stories by the same author


Children will be introduced to a particular author and view a collection of their work. We will look at how to find out about the author, for example from blurb or websites, and make notes. We will read several short stories, for example series of books that put the main character(s) into different situations. Children will be encouraged to read more by the same author. We will then compare specific features of the books read, including characters, events, settings. We will collect information about the main character(s) and use this to make predictions about how they will behave in different settings or in response to different events. We will explore the character's feelings in different situations using improvisation. In groups children will be provided with a collection of books by a particular author. Individually, children will read at least one complete book and reports back to the group, explaining their response and identifying important aspects. We will collaborate to identify common features and information about the author to present to the class. We will then select a character created by one of the authors they have read. We will discuss and role-play what that character would do in a particular situation and note ideas for a story plan. Then we will write a sustained story about this character. It will be demonstrated how to include dialogue and detail to expand the story and sustain the reader's interest. We will focus on using third person and past tense consistently.


Non chronological reports

We will begin by reading and comparing paper and ICT-based non-chronological reports. We will identify common features; evaluate effectiveness of text to support reading pathways. After the practical activities and undertaking some research in books and on the web for our animal topic, we will discuss generalising from repeated occurrences or observations so that the children can distinguish between a description of a single member of a group and the group in general, for example a particular dog, and dogs in general. We will read texts containing information in a simple report format, for example 'There are two sorts of x… ; 'They live in x… ; 'the As have x… , 'but the Bs… , etc. We will assemble information and use the text as a template for writing a report on it, appropriating the language to present, sequence and categorise ideas. From this we will independently plan a non-chronological report identifying a general animal theme, using subheadings, key details and information. Children will then write their own non-chronological reports arranged into simple paragraphs.


Extended stories/significant authors


We will begin by reading an extended story by a significant author as a serial. We will work on summarising the plot and look at links between events. We will make predictions at key moments in the story and track a particular character and notice ways that they change. We will analyse pieces of dialogue, re-enact and improvise new dialogue. Children will evaluate the story and discuss techniques used by the author to sustain the reader's interest. We will plan and write a sustained story independently. Children will be provided story ideas and support for planning and writing by working with groups during the writing process. We will discuss and agree success criteria based on learning in previous units. As a class we will focus on particular aspects of writing: composing compound sentences and using subordination; temporal connectives. Children will review their own writing and decide how it should be presented to the class (on paper or on screen). Finally groups will work together to dramatise a scene from one of the stories they have written. They will present it to the class who then evaluate the performance and make constructive comments



Poetry

As a class and in groups, children will hear and read a range of poems where the writer is responding to some closely observed or recalled experience. We will then perform some of the poems, individually or together, using actions and sound effects where appropriate to add to the poems' meaning. Children will be encouraged to respond to these poems in a variety of ways, for example through dance, drama and art. We will discuss what the poems are about and use our senses to think about the way the writer has chosen and used words to describe the details of his/her experience/observation. With extensive contribution from and involvement by children, as a class we will explore writing which describes some closely observed first-hand experience (in this case a shared one). This will be expressed either as simple poetry or as descriptive prose, with the emphasis on careful selection of words and phrases to describe and communicate the experience rather than or pattern or rhyme. Opportunity will be taken to focus on imaginative and adventurous language choices. Following on from this modelling, children in pairs or individually will write their own simple poetry or short prose texts (on paper or on screen), developing their writing in response to direct observation of the same or a different direct experience. Time will be given to children to explore the experience and their reaction before and during writing. Outcomes will then shared, discussed and performed, before being published on paper or on screen.



Science

Plants and animals in the local environment

Through this unit children learn about plants and animals in their immediate environment and how differences between places very close to each other result in a different range of plants and animals being found. They learn that like humans, plants and other animals reproduce.

Experimental and investigative work focuses on:



  • turning ideas into questions that can be investigated

  • presenting results

  • drawing conclusions.

Work in this unit also offers opportunities to relate understanding of science to the local environment, to consider how to treat living things and the environment with care and sensitivity and to recognise hazards to themselves and to take action to control the risks from these hazards.

Variation

Through this unit children will become more aware of the huge variety of living things within their local environment and of differences between them. They will learn that although individual living things are different there are similarities which can help to sort them into groups and that this is helpful.

Experimental and investigative work focuses on:



  • making observations, measurements and comparisons

  • presenting findings in drawings and block graphs

  • using results to draw conclusions.

Work in this unit also offers opportunities for children to relate understanding of science to environmental contexts and to consider how to treat living things with sensitivity



RE & PSHE

Identify what makes our world special



  • Explore and compare a range of creation stories/theories and talk about their meanings

  • name and explore festivals celebrating nature and note similarities

  • Explore how beliefs about the world can be expressed through the arts

  • Reflect and consider religious and spiritual feelings, experiences and concepts such as wonder, praise and thanks in relation to nature

  • Ask and respond to puzzling questions about how the world began and what it means to be a person

  • Reflect on spiritual and moral values about life and relate these to their own behaviour



Creative Curriculum

Animals

As Linguists we will write environment/plant/minibeast (comparative) descriptions, a comparison between minibeasts and wild animals, non-chorological reports on minibeasts and wild animals. We will write a recount about our class visit to the farm.

We will use primary and secondary sources of evidence, such as collections of minibeasts and plants from the school environment, to support our Literacy, Science, ICT and Art work.

As geographers will look at different environments /habitats, identifying different species of plant and animal. We will compare these from around the world, looking at the effect of the climate and why plants and animals thrive in certain environments. We will look at the types of weather and produce our own weather forecasts.

As scientists we will look at and explore the different plants and animals in our local environment. We will learn about the anatomy of the plant, photosynthesis and what a plant needs to make it grow. We will understand that flowering plants produce seeds which grow into new plants; we will observe new plants grow; record observations in tables and use these to draw conclusions. We will compare and contrast plants and animals from around the world by looking at their habitats and the weather in other countries. We will visit a Farm, for hands on experience of seeing animals in a habitat, feeding them, and learning how to look after them. We will also learn about the significance of a farm in producing fruit and vegetables for the local community. We will also engage with ‘real life’ minibeasts and reptiles brought into the class room.

As artists and designers we will design a nature trail, which we will use to plan and programme a route for a Bee-Bot. Working in collaboration, we will create a class nature garden where a class Bee-Bot will live and travel through programming. (linked with ICT and Maths). We will plan and design a minibeast collage, pompom or puppet, to practice and improve our textile (sewing/tapestry) skills. We look at the work of artist Henri Rousseau before producing our own jungle scene.

As musicians- we will listen to and discuss the carnival of the animals, Saint Sans. We will appreciate and discuss/compose animal sounds. We will learn Songs - Walking in the jungle, The Elephant, Hippopotamus’ song etc.




Anglo Saxons

-Invaders and settlers

As Linguists we will read the story of the Beowulf by Michael Morpurgo. We will look through the espresso website to gain a better and visual understanding of the story. Children will produce a comic strip/story board of the story outline. We will unlock the Anglo-Saxon alphabet and writing our own sentences using the Saxon ‘Runes’

As historians We will learn about who the Saxons were and why they came to England. We will look at aspects of their daily life such as village life, clothing, religion, the Saxon Army, famous Saxon leaders, famous Saxon stories and the archaeological finds at Sutton Hoo. We will use secondary sources of information (non-fiction books and the internet) to research Alfred the Great and king Arthur.

As geographers will look at the geographical locations of where the Anglo-Saxons settled, and why they decided to invade and settle in certain areas and not others. We will use maps and the internet to find the locations. We will become detectives and identify the mystery of Sutton Hoo and the artefacts which were discovered. We will find out about the origins of place names, identifying on survey explorer maps names chosen by the Anglo Saxons and how they often describe the landscape or past activities in a given area.

As scientists ( most of this science block will be a stand alone unit) we will look identify ways in which the appearance of humans changes as they get older and identify how some characteristics will not alter. We will compare the appearance of the Anglo Saxons with ourselves, exploring how we are similar and different. We will then investigate ways in which humans are similar to each other and different in others. We will explore human variation making observations and comparisons and recording in the most appropriate graphs and tables.

As artists and designers we will build and construct a small Anglo-Saxon Village. We will make a loom frame to weave materials and complete braiding to explore certain aspects of everyday Anglo Saxon life.

As performers we will adopt different drama roles of an Anglo Saxon family and perform stories to the class. We will participate in games played in Anglo Saxon times (patrolling the defences and Saxon Eye) and teach them to other children.



As musicians-we will learn about the instruments Anglo Saxons used to play and recreated our own.




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