Preparation Workshop on Gender



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Preparation Workshop on Gender



Objektives:


  • Participants familiarise with the concept of gender and discuss the different dimensions of gender

  • Participants are sensitised about the influence of gender in their biography and everyday life

  • The discussion on gender is linked to the discussion on child’s rights (optional)


Outcome:

  • The participants of the workshop prepare a collage about the life of girls and boys in their community (to present it in the conference in Berlin).

  • They elect two representatives (one girl and one boy) who will travel to Berlin.

  • The results of the workshop are documented to enrich the preparation of the conference in Germany.


Time frame:

1. day: Preparation Workshop

2. day: Information about the conference, selection process, designing of the overview


Methodology:

The following exercises are a proposal for the preparation workshop. Feel free to convert the different steps to your cultural context. The idea of the exercises is to sensitise the participants about the influence of gender in their own biography, their family life and their career choice. The objective of the workshop is not to find the right answers to the questions. Rather the participants should start to deal with the different aspects of gender issues through their own perspective.

In order to start a discussion on gender issues it is important to point out the differences between girls and boys and women and men. Distinct behaviour, roles in the family and positions in society clarify that gender is a relevant social category.

Be aware that for this a lot of stereotypes and apparent biological explanations will be used by the youth. One objective of the workshop should also be to challenge these associations and to broaden their mind.

All exercises have an interactive character. By playing a game or discussing in smaller groups the participants approach the subject in a creative manner.

Some sections include a warming-up corresponding to the topic and an exercise. A discussion process has to be integrated in every section.


We will refer to some of these exercise in the beginning of the workshop in Berlin.
For a common understanding on gender and gender equality, we refer to the definition of UN Women’s Watch (http://www.un.org/womenwatch/osagi/gendermainstreaming.htm ):

Gender: refers to the social attributes and opportunities associated with being male and female and the relationships between women and men and girls and boys, as well as the relations between women and those between men. These attributes, opportunities and relationships are socially constructed and are learned through socialisation processes. They are context/ time-specific and changeable. Gender determines what is expected, allowed and valued in a women or a man in a given context. In most societies there are differences and inequalities between women and men in responsibilities assigned, activities undertaken, access to and control over resources, as well as decision-making opportunities. Gender is part of the broader socio-cultural context. Other important criteria for socio-cultural analysis include class, race, poverty level, ethnic group and age.

Equality between women and men (gender equality): refers to the equal rights, responsibilities and opportunities of women and men and girls and boys. Equality does not mean that women and men will become the same but that women’s and men’s rights, responsibilities and opportunities will not depend on whether they are born male or female. Gender equality implies that the interests, needs and priorities of both women and men are taken into consideration - recognising the diversity of different groups of women and men. Gender equality is not a “women’s issue” but should concern and fully engage men as well as women. Equality between women and men is seen both as a human rights issue and as a precondition for, and indicator of, sustainable people-centred development


A.Getting to know each other




Warming up to form groups in a specific order





Time

15 minutes

Material




Notes for the facilitator




Process

All of the participants form new groups with every one of the following topics:

e.g. “How many sisters and brothers do you have” Then all the ones who have 1 brother or sister stand together, all the ones with two, with three etc.



  • Age

  • Number of sisters and brothers

  • Part of the country where they come from

  • Spoken languages

  • ....


  1. Introduction of „Gender“


Brainstorming: “What are the differences between girls and boys?” “What do they have in common?”


Time

15 minutes

Material

Flipchart paper, markers

Notes for the facilitator

The facilitator or one of the participants takes down all of the ideas of the group without comment. Afterwards the group discusses the results.


Process

The group members brainstorm their ideas on the two questions and then discuss the results.


Quiz: Do I enter the room as a boy or a girl?





Time

15 minutes

Material




Notes for the facilitator




Process

Three or four participants leave the room. Before entering again they decide if they enter as a boy or a girl. The others have to guess their sex only by observing the movements and the behaviour.



Discussion: “What is typical male and female body language?” “How do boys and girls express their sex (e. g. with cloths, hairstyle, jewellery)?” “Have there been any changes over the last generations?”


Time

30 minutes

Material

Flipchart paper, markers, smaller cards

Notes for the facilitator

This exercise shows the different expressions of gender. The gender role can be determined by the biological sex. With a view to the changes over the last generations the historical modification of gender becomes clearer.


Process

Every member of the group answers the questions on his/her own. They note the responses on the cards. Afterwards everybody presents their answers in the group.


  1. Biography


Exercise: Male and female attributes (e. g. strong, loud, emotional, emphatic)


Time

45 minutes

Material

Flipchart paper, normal paper, markers, pens

Notes for the facilitator

This exercise shows that stereotyped attributes of male and female behaviour not necessarily correspond with the view the participants have of themselves as girls or boys.

Process

  1. The whole group collects a list of general characteristics of persons, e.g. communicative, modest, intelligent, lazy (without defining at first if these are male or female).

  2. In a second step every participant notes the characteristics and decides with a scale of 1 – 5 how much these attributes correspond to themselves.

  3. In a third step the whole group categorises the characteristics into corresponding more to boys or girls. Now they can compare this with their own view of themselves.


Exercise: Personal development: “Who has so far encouraged and supported me?” “Who has detained my personal development?” “Were they men or women?”



Time

1 hour

Material

Flipchart paper, markers

Notes for the facilitator

This exercise is an individual one. The reflection of the personal development can touch very personal subjects. All the participants should decide on their own if they want to present their results. Regarding the gender aspect: can you identify a pattern in the support given, e.g. girls always supported by female members of the familiy of community y vice versa.

Process

Everybody should write down who (e.g. mother, father, sister, teacher) supported them in the different periods of their lives (e. g. early childhood, school). Were these people who supported you primarily male or female?


  1. Family life and partnership



Game: chair circle





Time

15 minutes

Material




Notes for the facilitator

This game is a warming-up for the following exercise about duties within the family.

Process


All participants sit in a circle. The facilitator counts out family members (3 – 4 persons per relative, e. g. 3 daughters, 4 aunts, 3 grandfathers, 5 nephews). There is one chair less than there are participants. One person stands in the centre of the circle. This person calls out the different family members. E.g. all aunts have to change their places. The person in the centre tries to get a chair as well. The one who is left without a chair is the new one in the centre.

The person in the centre may also call out “the whole family”, which means that everyone has to change chairs




Discussion: Division of function within the family





Time

30 minutes

Material

Flipchart paper, markers, smaller cards

Notes for the facilitator

This exercise expresses the gender-specific division of duties within the family.

Process

Everybody presents the different functions, duties and responsibilities of the different members of their family. Then the group collects the results on the flipchart.


Story of Peter, Paul and Mary




Time


1,5 hours

Material

Picture and text of the story (see attachment)

Notes for the facilitator

As our experience shows, young people are very often emotionally touched by the story and eager to discuss the presented conflict, as it is close to their own experiences. The aim of the story is to initiate a discussion on the influence of behavioural patterns attributed to girls and boys. The idea is not to present a final solution for the conflict or agree on a comon moral judgement as far as the behaviour of the three persons are concerned. Rather it would be important that the participants put themselves in the positions of Peter, Paul and Mary and try to understand their reactions from a gender point of view.

Process

The facilitator tells the story of Peter, Paul and Mary.

The group should then discuss the behaviour of the Peter, Paul and Mary from the different perspectives of the three, e.g. What is Mary’s and what is Paul’s impression of Peter’s behaviour? What is Peter’s motivation to break up with Mary? Would it have made a difference in the story if Peter and Paul were girls and Mary a boy? What might be possible solutions for the conflict? These could be presented in role-plays.





  1. Career choice



Game: Pantomime about professions





Time

15 minutes

Material


Paper, pens

Notes for the facilitator

This game is a warming-up for the following exercise.

Process

The participants divide into two groups. Every group notes different professions on small papers. One of the other group takes one of these papers and presents to his group the profession in form of pantomime. The group that has guessed the most professions wins.



Discussion: Male and female profession





Time

30 minutes

Material

Flipchart paper, markers

Notes for the facilitator

To highlight the gender-specific division of the labour market, it is helpful to have a look on typical male and female professions. As in the exercise about typical male and female attributes, the second part is a discussion about their own views on this labour division by gender.

Process

The group collects typical male and female professions on a flipchart. Afterwards they discuss their own plans for their professional career.

Option: Role-Play about a woman in a typical male profession and a man in a typical female profession.





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