Professor Adelle Blackett, Winter 2009, by Mae J. Nam



Download 0.77 Mb.
Page1/23
Date conversion04.09.2017
Size0.77 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   23
Labour Law


Professor Adelle Blackett, Winter 2009, by Mae J. Nam (updated from Monika Rahman 2008 Summary)


I. Introduction to the Field of Labour and Employment Law 3

(I) – Industrial Relations Framework 3



The Rand Decision (1946), [1996] 1 C.L.L.R. 1356 3

Fudge & Tucker on Industrial Legality (Not in Assigned Readings) 5

ILO Declaration of Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work – Key Messages 5

(II) Division of Powers - Jurisdiction 6



Northern Telcom Ltd. v. Communications Workers, [1980] 1 SCR 115 6

McIntyre c. I.A.M. & A. W. 2007 QCCA 1178 (41) 7

CAW – Canada, Local 444 v. Great Blue Heron Gaming, 2007 ONCA 814 (49) 8

II. Collective Bargaining Policy & Industrial Legality 9

Delisle v. Canada (Deputy Attorney General), [1999] 2 S.C.R. 989 10

(I) Freedom of Association for Agricultural Workers 12



Dunmore v. Ontario (Attorney General), [2001] 3 S.C.R. 1016 12

Committee on Freedom of Association Report Canada (Case No. 1900), Report #308 (1997) 14

Committee on Freedom of Association Report Canada (Case No. 1900), Report #330 (2003) 15

Travailleurs et travailleuses unis de l’alimentation et du commerce, section locale 501 c. La Légumière Y. C. inc. et al. (24 Sept 2007), 2007 QCCRT 0467 16


III. Relationship between Freedom of Association & Collective Bargaining Policy 17

(i) The Labour Trilogy: No Right to Collective Bargaining or Strike 17



Reference Re Public Service Employee Relations Act (Alta.), [1987] 1 S.C.R. 313 17

PSAC v. Canada, [1987] 1 S.C.R. 424 20

RWDSU v. Saskatchewan, [1987] 1 S.C.R. 460 22

(ii) Overriding an Collectively Bargained Agreement 24



Newfoundland (Treasury Board) v. N.A.P.E., [2004] 3 S.C.R. 381 24

(ii) Right to Collective Bargaining Recognized 26



Health Services and Support – Facilities Subsector Bargaining Assn. v. British Columbia, 2007 SCC 27 26

Fraser (Attorney General), 2008 ONCA 760 29

CSN c. Québec (Procurer general), 2007 QCCS 5513 31

Plourde v. Québec (Commission des relations du travail) 2007 QCCS 3165 32

Plourde v. Québec (Commission des relations du travail) 2007 QCCA 1210 32

IV. Acquisition and Termination of Bargaining Rights 32

(i) Employee Status 32


CSN c. Québec (Procurer general), 2008 QCCS 5057 34


Pointe Claire (City) v. Quebec (Labour Court), [1997] 1 S.C.R. 1015 34

(ii) Bargaining Unit Determination 37



Natrel Inc. v. Syndicat démocratique des distributeurs (1996), T.T. 567 37

(iii) Successor Rights 39



Ivanhoe Inc. v. UFCW, Local 500, [2001] 2 S.C.R. 565 40

Sept-Îles (City) v. Quebec (Labour Court), [2001] S.C.R. 670 43

T.U.A.C. loc. 503 c. Quebec (Commission des relations du travail) [2008] D.T.E. E-38 46

Syndicat national du lair inc c. Laiterie Royala inc., 2004 QCRT 602) 46

V. Unfair Labour Practices 47

The Rise and Fall of A Collective Agreement 47

(i) Hampering Unionization Efforts 48



Syndicat canadien des communications, de l’énergie et du papier, local 194 v. Disque Améric, [1996] A.Q. 3381 (Tribunal du travail) 49

(ii) Failure to Bargain in Good Faith 51



Royal Oak Mines. v. CASAW, Local 4, [1996] 1 S.C.R. 369 51

(iii) Interference with Union Activity 53



C.B.C. v. Canada (Labour Relations Board), [1995] 1 S.C.R. 157 (“Goldhawk”) 53

(iv) Double-Breasting (in Quebec) 56


Ville-Marie Pontiac Buick Inc. v. Syndicat des travailleurs de garage de Montréal (C.S.N.), [1993] T.T. 162 56

(v) Closure 57


City Buick Pontiac (Montréal) Inc. v. Roy, [1981] T.T. 22 57

I.A.T.S.E., Stage Local 56 v. Société de la Place des Arts de Montréal, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 43 58

Violations of NAALC Labor Principles and Obligations St-Hubert McDonald’s Restaurant” 60



Cie Wal-Mart du Canada c. Québec (Commission des relations du travail) 2008 QCCA 236 61

VI. Negotiating a Collective Agreement 62

VII. Industrial Conflict 65

(i) Leafletting 67



U.F.C.W., Local 1518 v. KMart Canada, [1999] 2 S.C.R. 1083 67

(ii) Picketing 69



R.W.D.S.U., Local 558 v. Pepsi-Cola Canada Beverages (West) Ltd., [2002] 1 S.C.R. 156 69

(iii) Replacement Workers – S.109.1, QLC 70



AGSEM c. Université McGill, 2008 QCCRT 0179 (295) 71

VIII. Administration of the Collective Agreement 72

Isidore Garon ltée v. Tremblay; Fillion et Frères (1976) inc. V. Syndicat national des employés de garage du Québec inc., [2006] 1 S.C.R. 27 73

IX. The Individual under the Collective Agreement 76

Steele v. Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company, 323 U.S. 192 (1944) 77


McGill University Health Centre (Montreal General Hospital) v. Syndicat des employés de l’Hôpital 79eneral de Montréal, [2007] 1 S.C.R. 161 79

X. New Approaches to Labour Law in a Globalizing Economy 81

Harry Arthurs: Labour Law Without the State (1996) 82

Blackett, A Labour Law Critique of Codes of Corporate Conduct (2000) 82

XI. Steps in Certification, Unfair Labour Practices, etc. 83

Flow Chart 84


I. Introduction to the Field of Labour and Employment Law



What are the underlying objectives of labour law? What are the three regimes identified to meet those objectives during the fordist era? Why is Canadian labour law primarily regulated at the provincial level? Is current labour regulation in Canada in-sync with contemporary labour market challenges?
Blackett argues that many situations could be covered by labour law – seasonal agricultural workers, Wal-Mart employees, lawyers and articling students – but aren’t. The typical case that is covered by labour law is a person covered by a collective agreement. This might be a government employee, but unionization of gov’t workers didn’t emerge until the 1960s. We see the heart of intersection b/w labour law and industrialization in case involving Ford Motors in a judgment by Laskin CJ.

Labour law’s history is very much a history of people claiming their ability to marshal their power to organize and extract better working, and hence living, conditions. Initially, many unions claimed the right to be left alone – i.e. not to have CML step in. The story of labour law is also the story of industry and business in a Post-Industrial World

We will consider interface between human rights norms and collective representation.


  • The Rand formula (also referred to as automatic check-off) is a workplace situation where the payment of trade union dues is mandatory regardless of the worker's union status. This formula is designed to ensure that no employee will opt out of the union simply to avoid dues yet reap the benefits of the union's accomplishments (such as ensuring higher wages, better job security or other benefits).

  • Supreme Court of Canada Justice Ivan Rand, the eponym of this law, introduced this formula in 1946 as an arbitration decision ending the Ford Strike of 1945 in Windsor, Ontario.

Sources of Labour Law: relationship and power dynamic between - Charter (2(d) and 15), Labour Codes (QLC, CLC, OLRA), alternative statutes, CML law, international law






  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   23


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page