R. J. Aird Headteacher Summer Term 2009



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Introduction
Barrs Court School caters for secondary aged pupils (11-19 years) who have:


  • Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties (PMLD);

  • Severe Learning Difficulties (SLD);

  • Moderate Learning Difficulties (MLD) made more complex by additional learning difficulties and disabilities.

The educational needs and rights of these pupils are complex and wide ranging, so special educational provision at the school is designed to reflect this diversity and provide:



  • Individually designed regimes of therapeutic care in response to cognitive, sensori-neural, emotional and motor disabilities and any associated medical implications;

  • Individually tailored access to specialist curricula in response to personal barriers to learning and/or well being;

  • Generic entitlement to a broad and appropriately balanced and differentiated National Curriculum;

  • Individually tailored access to nationally accredited learning and qualification syllabuses at Key Stages 4 & 5.

This document seeks to summarise the manner in which the school organises:



  • The whole curriculum;

  • The framework for assessment, recording and reporting;

  • Target setting for raising standards of pupil performance.

R.J. Aird



Headteacher Summer Term 2009

General Organisation

Curriculum Plan



Assessment, Recording & Reporting Plan


Provision for Teaching & learning



Organisation of Lesson Plans

The Barrs Court School curriculum aims to enable all pupils to become:

Engaged learners who can apply their abilities in a functional way across a range of contexts and readily motivated to achieve and attain further learning.

Healthy learners who enjoy optimal standards of mental, emotional and physical well being and lead fulfilled lives.

Responsible learners who are self-determining and make positive contributions to their community.


And benefit from the Every Child Matters outcomes of:

Enjoy & Achieve

Be Safe

Be Healthy

Make a Positive Contribution

Social & Economic Well Being


Our overarching focus and organisation for learning can be summarised as:

Skills


Specialist Curriculum to overcome barriers to learning and well being; Literacy; Numeracy; ICT; Scientific Enquiry; Independent Living Skills; Work Related Learning

Knowledge & Understanding

Entitlement Curriculum as a vehicle for helping understand about the world via Creative & Inclusive Learning

Attitude & Attributes


Personal Profiles (Personal Learning & Thinking Skills); Transition Planning; Special Events

School Environment


Specialised resources; facilities; empathetic classrooms;

Workforce


Skills; knowledge; empowerment; partnership working with other agencies and families

Curriculum Organisation


Individual access to Specialist Curricula; An entitlement to Creative & Inclusive SoW, lesson planning; focus groups; targeted 1:1 support

Personalised Learning

Personal Profiles; IEP/SIRB/SILO; behavioural techniques; advocacy


Assessment


Continuous, formative & evidence based for linear and lateral progression; measurable outcomes; qualification routes

Enrichment


Special weeks and events; partnership with other schools/colleges; extended school; outreach into home

Themes we want to see running throughout the curriculum are

Whole Child Considerations; Inclusiveness; Enjoyment; Creative Use of Technology; Functionality; Self-Advocacy; Therapeutic Care;

The statutory curriculum entitlement comprises the following cross curricular themes and subjects:

Communication


Language & literacy

Creativity


Knowledge & Understanding

Personal, Social & Emotional


Physical Development

Problem solving, reasoning & numeracy


English ICT A & D Art Music MFL Sci Geog Hist RE Citizenship PSHE PE D&T Maths




The Barrs Court whole school assessment framework aims to make teaching and learning more effective for empowering individual learners by the use of the following procedures:

Strategic Interventions in Response to Barriers

  • Personal Profile outcomes

  • IEP target SILO outcomes




Entitlement Curriculum

  • Continuous assessment against SoW outcomes

  • Yearly & End of Key Stage curriculum target outcomes




Accredited Learning

  • ALL

  • NSP

  • ASDAN

  • NVQ Level 1

  • Duke of Edinburgh

  • Food Hygiene

  • Junior Leader



Transition Planning

  • Transition target outcomes:

  1. Independent living skills

  2. Vocational preparation




Pupil Performance Data Analysis

    • IEP/SILO data

    • Core subject data



Pupil

Monitoring


    • Reports to parents x 2

    • Appraisals of teacher assessment

    • Moderation by subject co-ordinators and regional

    • Accreditation

Workforce


  • Induction

  • In house certificate

  • In house diploma

  • Foundation degree

  • Post graduate certificate

  • Performance management interviews x 2



Whole School


  • Lesson observations

  • Subject co-ordinator annual reports to governors

  • Headteacher termly reports to governors

  • SEF

  • External quality marks

  • OfSTED

Which will inform us about:


  • In child achievement

  • Standards of behaviour

  • ECM related (be safe; be healthy; enjoy & achieve; positive contribution)

  • PLT related performance
  • Attainment against national norms

  • ECM related (enjoy & achieve; positive contribution)





  • ECM related (be safe; be healthy; enjoy & achieve; positive contribution)

  • Attainment rate against national norms

  • PLT related performance
  • PLT related performance

  • ECM (social & economic well being)


  • PLT related performance




  • Value added for individual pupils

  • Group trends

  • National benchmarks

  • Parental satisfaction

  • Consistency in ARR procedure

  • Consistency in teacher judgement

  • Levels of attainment in national qualifications
  • Maintenance of workforce competency in SEN


  • Individual staff competency in SEN

  • Individual staff contributions to pupil progression
  • Comparative class team performance


  • Pupil engagement

  • SDIP progress

  • Standard of provision against national norms

  • Attendance




Provision and Overarching Aim

Description of provision

Anticipated Learning Outcomes & Qualifications

  1. Specialist Curriculum

To overcome or minimise barriers to learning and well being that are posed by different disabilities
All Key Stages

ECM Focus:

  • Be safe

  • Be healthy

  • Enjoy & achieve

  • Positive contribution

PLT Focus:
  • Effective participators


Attainment Levels

P1-4:

  • Early Thinking Skills

  • Early Communication Skills

  • Early Motor Skills

  • Early Emotional Literacy

Attainment Levels P4 and above:

  • Reading Excellence Framework

Individual learning matter designed to provide:

    1. Guidance in distinctive pedagogy so this can be used for training teachers and teaching assistants and empower the personal learning styles of children who have PMLD.

    2. Best practice in the use of specialist resources such as Multi Sensory Environments, specialist software.

    3. Specialist teaching assistants to fulfil an effective interfacing role with multi-agencies; to provide expert assessment and strategic support to individual learners; to lead focus group interventions for small groups of learners with similar barriers to facilitate progression and disseminate best practice.

    4. Diagnostic, formative assessment of disabled children in a wide range of developmental areas.

    5. A range of suggested learning activities and strategic interventions to overcome barriers; inform the differentiation of core subjects of the National Curriculum and assessment at P levels 1-4; provide evidence of lateral learning for pupils who do not find it easy to progress in a linear manner;.

    6. Strategic interventions via a SMART and quantified IEP target setting process;

    7. Continuous, evidence based teacher assessment.

    8. Annual and end of key stage curriculum target setting procedure.

    9. Minimum of 2 written and evidence based reports about pupil progress per year to parents.

  • Linear progression within P1-4 levels of English, Maths & Science


  • Lateral learning and generalisation of skills at P1-4 levels of English, Maths & Science.

  • Progress in overcoming communication impairments.

  • Progress in overcoming learning barriers associated with sensory and perceptual difficulties.

  • Progress in overcoming barriers associated with physical disabilities.

  • Progress in overcoming barriers associated with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties.

  • Progress in overcoming barriers to literacy.

  • Pupils able to influence others as part of PLT related learning.

  • Evidence from focus groups and related activities to demonstrate that pupil is benefiting from each of the 4 indicated ECM outcomes.

Provision and Overarching Aim

Description of provision

Anticipated Learning Outcomes & Qualifications

  1. The Entitlement Curriculum

To ensure outstanding standards of inclusive teaching, pupil engagement and attainment in subjects of the national curriculum and facilitate continuous teaching assessment
All Key Stages

(reducing entitlement per key stage)


ECM Focus:

  • Enjoy & achieve

  • Positive contribution


PLT Focus:

  • Creative thinkers


Attainment Levels:

P1-8


N.C. Levels 1-3

SoW across the school that have been analysed and revised in order to provide:

2.1 Enjoyable and hands on experiential learning opportunities.

2.2 Strong elements of sensory and cognitive learning to respond to pupils with different learning styles.

2.3 Teaching that is differentiated for pupils at different stages of development.

2.4 Lessons that motivate pupils to investigate, experiment and be curious.

2.5 Learning experiences that are lasting and memorable.

2.6 Teaching that stimulates pupils to engage in other aspects of learning.

2.7 Learning that is cross referenced to learning matter associated with the specialist curriculum to help pupils overcome learning barriers.

2.8 Anticipated learning outcomes that are differentiated according to P scale levels and above to ensure that pupil learning is related directly to what has been taught.

2.9 Learning outcomes that facilitate continuous, formative teacher assessment.



  • Linear progression in all subjects of the National Curriculum with challenging curriculum targets informed via continuous, formative assessment aimed to facilitate a minimum of two national curriculum level gains per key stage where relevant to a pupil’s degree of learning disability.

  • Lateral learning and generalisation in all P levels.

  • Optimum levels of engagement resulting in demonstrable ECM outcomes of enjoyment, achievement, positive contribution.

  • Pupils generating ideas, exploring possibilities, adapting ideas and trying out alternative solutions ( PLT related outcomes)

  • SoW at key stage 4 resulting in ALL and NSP accredited modules

  • SoW at key stage 5 resulting in ASDAN accredited modules



Provision and Overarching Aim

Description of provision

Anticipated Learning Outcomes & Qualifications

3. Transition to adulthood

To enable learners to enter work and adult life as confident, capable individuals who can organise themselves, manage change, take responsibility and persevere


Key Stages 4 & 5
ECM Focus:

  • Social and economic well being

  • Make a positive contribution


PLT Focus:

  • Independent enquirers

  • Team workers

  • Creative Thinkers

  • Self-managers

  • Reflective workers

  • Effective participators

Attainment levels:

All levels to

NVQ Level 1


A range of learning opportunities and SoW that have been designed to support transition to adulthood via the following:

3.1 Supported and independent living skills in:



  • Eating and drinking skills including meal preparation;

  • Dressing skills including the selection/purchase of appropriate clothing;

  • Personal hygiene and grooming;

  • Basic skills for maintaining good health;

  • Housekeeping skills;

  • Independent travel skills;

  • Self-determination and assertiveness.

3.2 Work related learning:

  • Japonica work related learning

  • Vocational preparation organised at Workmatch.

3.3 Work experience:

  • Fully sheltered transition preparation in adult day care destinations;

  • Fully sheltered school based work experience;

  • School supervised work experience in local community venues (previously called community service);

  • Work experience with local employers.

3.4 Enterprise Education

3.5 College link courses




  • Functional skills in all aspects of independent and planned dependency living;

  • Process and evaluate information in

investigations, plan, make informed and well-reasoned

decisions, recognise that others have different attitudes. (PLT)



  • Think creatively to try different ways to tackle a problem, work with

others to find imaginative solutions (PLT)

  • Evaluate personal strengths and limitations, (PLT)
  • Set realistic goals and invite feedback (PLT)


  • Work confidently with others, adapt to different contexts and take personal responsibility (PLT)

  • Cope with change, respond positively

to new priorities and challenges

participate in life of school, college, workplace or wider

community (PLT)


  • Accredited ALL module (Environment)

  • Accredited NSP modules (Animal Care/Environment/Horticulture)

  • Accredited ASDAN module (Towards Independence: Improving the Environment))

  • NVQ Level 1 (Retail)

  • Food Handling Hygiene Certificate

  • Junior Sports Leader Certificate

  • Duke of Edinburgh Awards at bronze and silver levels




Provision and Overarching Aim

Description of provision

Anticipated Learning Outcomes & Qualifications

4. Focus Groups

To develop specific areas of function, well being and learning via highly motivating and therapeutic approaches


All Key Stages
ECM Focus:

  • Stay Safe

  • Be Healthy

  • Enjoy and Achieve

  • Make a Positive Contribution


PELT Focus:

  • Effective participators


Attainment levels:

  • All levels but primarily for P1-4




An assortment of cross key stage teaching groups with specific focuses:

  • FG1 – Passive movement; stretching and positioning; rebound and hydrotherapy
  • FG2 – Developing body and spatial awareness


  • FG3 – Interactive Movement / Mobility

  • FG4 – Sensory motor development

  • FG5 – Developing Communication




  • Improved respiratory function, digestion & circulation

  • Improved fitness, muscle strength and tone

  • Reduced risk of contractures and deformities, less pain / discomfort

  • Increase in self esteem; confidence; autonomy; independence

  • Improved balance, coordination, saving reactions, motor control

  • Increased awareness of others and ability to make a positive impact on other people

  • Improved self image and confidence

  • Ability to make and express choices

  • Increase in skills of listening and attending

  • Increase in ability to express feelings, needs and preferences to others

  • Increased ability to use residual senses to gather information from surroundings and participate in activities more effectively

  • Increased tolerance of touch and exploration of environment

  • Increased understanding of the way in which own sounds, vocalisations and gestures can affect people and events in immediate vicinity

  • Improved quality of vocalisations and speech





Provision and Overarching Aim

Description of provision

Anticipated Learning Outcomes & Qualifications

5. Pupil Profile

To enable learners to engage in teaching and therapeutic care in ways that are empathetic to their personalised learning styles


All Key Stages

ECM Focus:


  • Stay Safe

  • Be Healthy

  • Enjoy and Achieve

  • Make a Positive Contribution

  • Achieve social & economic well being

PLT Focus:

  • Independent enquirers

  • Team workers

  • Creative Thinkers

  • Self-managers

  • Reflective workers

  • Effective participators

Attainment levels:

  • All levels




A dynamic description of an individual pupil’s personalised learning style supporting by a range of therapeutic programmes as relevant to each child’s personal circumstances. Some profiles will incorporate “special arrangements” that are required in everyday provision to ensure a child’s optimal level of engagement. The profile is reviewed at each meeting with parents. The profile includes:

    • Personal profile (succinct introduction to pupil file)

    • Therapeutic programmes as relevant:

  1. Behaviour strategy

  2. Speech & Language Therapy programme

  3. Physiotherapy programme

  4. Care plan

  5. Continence plan

Evidence of ECM outcomes relating to:

  • Stay Safe

  • Be Healthy

  • Enjoy and Achieve

  • Make a Positive Contribution

  • Achieve social & economic well being


Evidence of PLT related outcomes:

  • Functional skills in all aspects of independent and planned dependency living;

  • Process and evaluate information in

investigations, plan, make informed and well-reasoned

decisions, recognise that others have different attitudes. (PLT)


  • Think creatively to try different ways to tackle a problem, work with

others to find imaginative solutions (PLT)

  • Evaluate personal strengths and limitations, (PLT)

  • Set realistic goals and invite feedback (PLT)

  • Work confidently with others, adapt to different contexts and take personal responsibility (PLT)

  • Cope with change, respond positively

to new priorities and challenges

participate in life of school, college, workplace or wider



community (PLT)




Basic Requirements for the Organisation of Lesson Plans


  1. Lesson Planning

  • Lesson objective is clearly stated, ie., what is going to be taught and what the main learning outcomes are going to be in terms of key concepts, understandings and skills;

  • Main activities within the lesson are described, together with any differentiation by task and/or learning outcome on behalf of individual pupils;

  • Cross curricular learning opportunities are highlighted (ie., cross curricular use of literacy, numeracy and ICT);

  • Opportunities to address IEP targets for individual learners are highlighted;

  • Opportunities to address ECM/PLT outcomes are highlighted;

  • Teaching Resources are identified and readied in advance of the lesson;

  • Key tasks for each member of the class team are highlighted;




  1. Lesson Organisation
  • Each lesson begins with an introduction in which the teacher shares the lesson objective, reminds pupils of any previous lessons on this topic and tests their recall and any prior learning they have demonstrated;


  • Language of tuition is kept simple, key vocabulary is stressed and accompanied by sign and/or symbol;

  • The main activity should involve creative and inclusive tasks (ie something to appeal to different personal learning styles), differentiated by task and outcome as necessary;

  • Evidence of pupil attainment and/or achievement should be gathered as pupils demonstrate progress;




  1. End of Lesson

  • Each lesson ends with a plenary to summarise what has been taught and what individual pupils have learned;

  • Evidence is annotated, assessed and stored in Evidence Files;

  • Lesson plan is stored in relevant SoW folder for future use.



Planning

Organisation

End of Lesson

Progress Observed & Evidence

Teaching & Learning Comments

  • Lesson objective is clearly stated, ie., what is going to be taught and what the main learning outcomes are going to be in terms of key concepts, understandings and skills;

  • Main activities within the lesson are described, together with any differentiation by task and/or learning outcome on behalf of individual pupils;

  • Cross curricular learning opportunities are highlighted (ie., cross curricular use of literacy, numeracy and ICT);
  • Opportunities to address IEP targets for individual learners are highlighted;


  • Opportunities to address ECM/PLT outcomes are highlighted;

  • Teaching Resources are identified and readied in advance of the lesson;

  • Key tasks for each member of the class team are highlighted;




  • Each lesson begins with an introduction in which the teacher shares the lesson objective, reminds pupils of any previous lessons on this topic and tests their recall and any prior learning they have demonstrated;

  • Language of tuition is kept simple, key vocabulary is stressed and accompanied by sign and/or symbol;

  • The main activity should involve creative and inclusive tasks (ie something to appeal to different personal learning styles), differentiated by task and outcome as necessary;

  • Evidence of pupil attainment and/or achievement should be gathered as pupils demonstrate progress;




  • Each lesson ends with a plenary to summarise what has been taught and what individual pupils have learned;

  • Evidence is annotated, assessed and stored in Evidence Files;

  • Lesson plan is stored in relevant SoW folder for future use.










LEARNING (Attainment & achievement, progress, attitudes, concentration and work rate)

Strengths:


Areas for Development:

TEACHING:(Relationships, modelling, expectations, communication, planning, key skills, use of resources & TAs, personalised teaching)


Strengths:


Areas for Development:


Overall grade: (1 outstanding); (2 good); (3 satisfactory); (4 inadequate)



The Specialist Curriculum

Introduction to the Specialist Curriculum



Exemplar Contents Page from a subject of the specialist curriculum (Early Communication Skills)




(Additional exemplars from the Specialist Curriculum are contained elsewhere in ARSI , see sections on Overcoming “Barriers to Learning & Well Being” &Assessment Procedures”)

Introduction to the Specialist Curriculum

1.1 Because children who have profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD) have learning needs that often stand outside of the learning matter contained within the National Curriculum, additional, specialist curricula has been developed at this school to ensure that all pupils will have the opportunity to achieve and attain at optimal standards. The learning matter contained within the specialist curriculum has also been reinforced by adding links to relevant subjects of the National Curriculum and to distinctive teaching approaches which include best practice in the use of valuable resources and facilities.


1.2 The specialist curriculum is made up of four “subjects” or curriculum areas:

  • Early Thinking Skills (National Curriculum Mathematics & Science P1-4);
  • Early Communication Skills (National Curriculum English P1-4);


  • Early Motor Skills (National Curriculum Physical Education);

  • Early Emotional Literacy (under development)

(In October 2007 the first two subjects of the specialist curriculum were appraised by a joint team of OfSTED and HMI when the content was described as being at the “cutting edge” of PMLD practice. Since 2007 over 95 other special schools in UK have purchased titles from our specialist curriculum and high levels of interest have continued unabated since then. Copies of each title are available in all classes and additional copies are available in the school’s Conference Room.)
1.3 Teaching materials published within the specialist curriculum provide teachers and teaching assistants with the skills, understanding and techniques to teach pupils who have PMLD in accordance with the demands posed by their sensory impairments, motor disabilities, cognitive impairments, emotional disabilities and medical problems. The learning matter included in these specialist curriculum subjects relates directly to the personalised learning styles typical of children who have complex disabilities and is cross referenced to National Curriculum P levels 1-4 in subjects associated with the area of disability under consideration (as described above in 1.2 above). The documentation published in support of each of these specialist subjects has been designed to:

    • Provide guidance in distinctive pedagogy so this can be used for training teachers and teaching assistants and empower the personal learning styles of children who have PMLD;

  • Describe best practice in the use of specialist resources and expensive facilities such as Multi Sensory Environments and Hydrotherapy Pools;

  • Empower teaching assistants to fulfil an effective interfacing role with therapists and multi-disciplinary teams;

  • Enable the diagnostic, formative assessment of disabled children in a wide range of developmental areas as a basis to the formulation of “Strategic Interventions and Responses to Barriers” (SIRBs);


  • Provide a range of learning activities to help overcome learning barriers associated with diverse disability types and inform the content of IEP targets and their associated “Strategic Interventions Level Objectives” (SILOs);

  • Inform the differentiation of core subjects of the National Curriculum at the very earliest P level stages and provide evidence of lateral learning for pupils who do not find it easy to progress in a linear manner;

  • Provide information about further reading, suppliers and useful contacts.

1.4 Linear learning is not a characteristic of the personalised learning styles of pupils who have PMLD. However, it is not sufficient, nor respectful to the pupils concerned, to say that such pupils are “working towards” a particular level of the National Curriculum because such statements are unspecific and meaningless. However, by linking P levels with good quality IEP targets and SILOs that are, in turn, rooted in specialist curricula, it is possible for teachers to plan for lateral progression and minimal linear attainment in ways that are SMART and that will enable pupils to achieve ECM outcomes. Sets of performance indicators have been devised to assist teachers assess pupil attainment within P levels 1-4 and these have been cross referenced to specialist PMLD curricula and their associated frameworks for assessment, together with meaningful teaching activities and guidance on PMLD pedagogy. For example, P levels 1-4 for mathematics and science have been cross referenced to the Early Thinking Skills Curriculum (ETS) which sets out the framework for teaching and assessing pupil performance in the earliest stages of sensory, cognitive and perceptual development. Pupils who have PMLD are assessed against both the expanded P level performance indicators and the assessment criteria pertaining to the ETS curriculum. This cross referencing allows teachers to make summative assessments about a pupil’s academic progress in mathematics P levels 1-4 in tandem with the task of defining SMART strategies in response to the pupil’s inevitably impaired sensory, cognitive and perceptual functions. The teaching matter associated with each assessment criterion from the ETS curriculum provides sufficient guidance so as to make target setting SMART.

1.5 Included in these specialist curriculum documents are instructions to guide teachers and teaching assistants in the use of distinctive pedagogical approaches and the use of specialised resources. The development and implementation of these two subjects from the specialist curriculum, including in-service training based on the guidance notes described above, has empowered Training Instructors in Disability to take a leading role in the education of pupils with PMLD and make best use of advice from colleagues from multi-disciplinary services such as speech and language therapy and occupational therapy and ensure that the therapeutic needs of pupils who have PMLD are readily incorporated into SMART IEP targets and associated SILOs.
1.6 An exemplar contents page from one of the subjects of the specialist curriculum has been reproduced below to illustrate how specialist curriculum documents are set out. Further information about how the specialist curriculum documents link to teaching and learning on subjects of the National Curriculum had already been described in the previous section.



The Entitlement Curriculum
Schemes of Work

(Creative & Inclusive Learning with Differentiated Outcomes)

The Design of SoW and links to the Specialist Curriculum



Literacy

(Reading Excellence Framework)

ICT


(under development)

Numeracy


(under development)

  1. Introduction to the Entitlement Curriculum


    1. Pupils at Barrs Court School have an entitlement to all subjects of the National Curriculum although the breadth of subject coverage is varied incrementally, according to key stage, in order to reflect the changing needs of pupils as they progress chronologically. For example, at Key Stage 3 pupils have an entitlement to the full range of subjects, but at Key Stage 4 a modern foreign language is no longer taught as an entitlement. This because work related learning is introduced at Key Stage 4 and there is insufficient time available within the taught week to include all subjects of the National Curriculum. At Key Stage 5, the entitlement curriculum is reduced still further to allow for the timetabling of work experience, college link courses etc.




    1. National Curriculum subjects are traditionally taught via sets of lessons organised under the umbrella framework of Schemes of Work (SoW). SoW are organised for either half a term, or one term, depending on the subject and topic. A SoW comprises a set of lesson outlines that describe the various topics and learning experiences which a teacher will need to implement. The teacher is then responsible for adding detail to actual lesson plans in order to suit the prevailing circumstances. However, when one considers the diverse personalised learning styles and attainment levels that characterise learners at Barrs Court School, this traditional SoW design does not provide sufficient detail for a teacher at Barrs Court School to differentiate the proposed teacher matter easily. In response to this dilemma, the traditional design of SoW has been further developed to help ensure that:

  • Teaching will be empathetic to a wide range of personalised learning styles;
  • Anticipated learning outcomes from each SoW can be carefully targeted to reflect varying ability levels and so facilitate continuous, evidence based teacher assessment.


For the highest attaining pupils, extension materials are provided in collusion with local mainstream schools and/or subject advisory teachers from the local authority. For the lowest attaining pupils, the school’s own Specialist Curriculum provides extensive teaching ideas for National Curriculum Levels P1-4 in the core subjects. This approach helps pupils benefit from the ECM related outcomes of “enjoy and achieve” and “make a positive contribution”.


    1. The bulk of teaching for subjects of the National Curriculum is delivered via SoW organised in this way. However, some subject matter relating to literacy, ICT and numeracy, benefits from cross-curricular delivery and these approaches are also described below. SoW are taught via a “rolling programme” for each key stage, representing the number of years a pupil will be at each key stage and how the full syllabus of intended subject coverage will be delivered during the course of a pupil’s school career.



  1. Creative and inclusive SoW with differentiated learning outcomes

    1. The traditional design of SoW at Barrs Court School has been enhanced with the addition of creative and inclusive teaching activities in order that teaching approaches for each SoW will:

  • Provide enjoyable and hands on experiential learning;

  • Include strong elements of sensory and cognitive learning;

  • Be meaningful to pupils who may be at different stages of development;

  • Motivate pupils to investigate, experiment and be curious;

  • Have sufficient impact to provide lasting, memorable experiences;

  • Stimulate pupils to want to engage in other aspects of learning;



    1. The hands on, multi sensory activities described in the inclusive and creative additions provide emotionally charged contexts for learning so that pupils will enjoy their learning and be more likely to benefit from the assertion that creativity is fundamental to advances in all areas of life, in line with the PLT related outcome that pupils should be, “Creative Thinkers”. Creativity is often key to the extent to which pupils enjoy their learning experiences and so benefit from the contingent learning relationship of:

The extent to which a pupil enjoys an activity




The likelihood of strong memory imprinting and retention of new information




Enhanced capacity for reflection (PLT), understanding and attainment




    1. The fact that creative activities can also be readily linked to multi-sensory experiences means that associated teaching approaches are more likely to appeal to the personalised learning styles typical of pupils who have the most complex learning disabilities and so promote classroom inclusiveness. The creative and inclusive activities developed at Barrs Court School have been cross referenced to the school’s Specialist Curriculum in order to ensure there is an appropriate balance between the entitlement curriculum and additional, specialist curricula in keeping with advice provided by SCAA in 1999.



    1. School self-evaluation undertaken at Barrs Court School in the summer terms of 2005 and 2006 demonstrated that teacher assessment of pupil performance within the P levels of core subjects of the National Curriculum was not always fully endorsed by the evidence on file. As a consequence, anticipated learning outcomes from each SoW are differentiated to correspond to the P levels of the subject(s) being taught. This enables teachers and TAs to refer to the associated assessment framework on a lesson by lesson basis in order to monitor pupil performance and record attainments by reference to P levels. As evidence of attainment in subject specific P levels can now be retained from each lesson (usually in the form of digital photographs of pupils at work and/or copies of pupil work), summative teacher assessment can be undertaken by reference to the average score attained by each pupil across the full map of learning represented by SoW. Moderation of teacher assessment will also be much more easily undertaken because of the larger body of evidence that will be available for scrutiny and the fact that assessment is being based on what has actually been taught, as opposed to what has been interpreted against more generalised assessment criteria.





    1. An exemplar creative and inclusive SoW with differentiated learning outcomes for the core subject of English is replicated below as examples of how teaching and learning is organised for subjects of the National Curriculum that are delivered via rolling programmes of SoW. The example shows:

  • The basic SoW;

  • Creative and inclusive activities;

  • Links to the Specialist Curriculum for more ideas for differentiation and learning outcomes;

  • Further reading and reference materials;

  • Differentiated learning outcomes linked to English P Levels;

  • Exemplar Specialist Curriculum assessment criteria for helping make English relevant to learners at levels P1-4 (some criteria highlighted to show link to more teaching suggestions) and link to IEP related learning for communication impaired learners;

  • Exemplar Specialist Curriculum teaching suggestions to help male English relevant to learners at levels P1-4 and link to IEP related learning for communication impaired learners.





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