Read the following story and then answer the questions below, one for each class period



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Monday September 19th

Read the following story and then answer the questions below, one for each class period.


“Eat Dirt” by Rich Wallace

This goes back to seventh-grade football. I was one of the smallest guys on the team, but our town revered the game. Even those of us who weren’t particularly well suited to be football players went out for a chance to play under the lights in front of thousands of people. Soccer was not even an afterthought in the region of New Jersey back in the lat sixties.

So I suited up with everybody else, worked my butt off every day, did the drills and took my hits and ran the sprints and came home exhausted and dehydrated every night.

In late August we have our first scrimmage. Hoboken comes to our grassless practice field. They’re good and they’re big. I don’t expect to play much, but I do expect to play.

An hour goes by. They’re pounding us on offense and defense. I kneel there with the other scrubs, aching to get in.

Another half hour. Only two or three of us still have clean uniforms. I’m seething—glaring at the head coach through my facemask.

A few more plays. An assistant coach walks over, taps me on the helmet. “Next play, get in there at middle linebacker.”

I stand up and put in my mouth guard.

The play ends. I run onto the field. The quarterback does an end-around and I take off in pursuit, but I get cut down by a lineman and wind up eating dirt.

I get to my feet and look around. My teammates are already running toward the goalposts at the other end of the field. Five laps says the coach lets go. I stand there dumbfounded. One play? Man, was I pissed off.

So I start sprinting and quickly pass everybody else. They’re more tired than I am. They played. I keep sprinting and finish about a lap ahead of the next runner. The head coach looks at me and grins. “You should run cross country in high school,” he says.

“I’m not in high school,” I say, not bothering to hide my anger.

I think I made my point. The next day he put me on the kickoff team. I played a fair amount that season, even carried the ball a few times. The next year I did better.

In high school, I switched to cross country.

1st period

. In what ways does the story most help the reader?

a. It provides a way to discover your own true talents in athletics and become a pro athlete.

b. It provides a humorous insight into the way kids think when they’re young.

c. It provides excellent football playing tips.
2nd period

. Which sentences does not support the focus or theme of this text:

a. In late August we have our first scrimmage.

b. I don’t expect to play much, but I do expect to play.

c. In high school, I switched to cross country.
3rd period

. Which is the correct way to write the sentence, “five laps says the coach lets go”

a. “Five laps!” says the coach. “Let’s go!”

b. “Five laps?” says the coach. “Lets go.”

c. “Five laps,” says the coach, “lets go.”
4th period

. Which text would be most useful as a source of information for this text:

a. High School Cross Country State Winners

b. Championship Football Teams in the NFL

c. Determining Your Best Talents and Interests
5th period.

In the context of the sentence, “The quarterback does an end-around” we interpret ‘end-around’ to mean:

a. an obscene gesture toward the other team

b. a move to set up the play

c. a signal to his coach to indicate the play they’re using
6th period.

In the context of the sentence “I’m seething---“ we interpret “seething” to mean:

a. a joyful emotion

b. a painful reaction to a toothache

c. the ability to see things from another point of view

d. anger and rage simmering beneath the surface

7th period.

In the context of the sentence “In late August we have our first scrimmage” we interpret “scrimmage” to mean:

a. a new type of cabbage

b. a practice game against our teammates

c. a longer practice

d. a card game using poker chips

Tuesday Sept. 20th

1st period Every day vs. everyday

Every day: each day.

Example: I learn something new every day.



Everyday: ordinary.

Example: These are my everyday clothes.


Circle the correct word usage in the following sentence:
2nd period

Write a sentence with correct subject-verb agreement.


3rd period

Choose the word or phrase that best completes the sentence.

I listened to them with an open mind, but I still disagree with some of _________ ideas.


  1. them

  2. there

  3. their

  4. they’re

4th period Every day vs. everyday



Every day: each day.

Example: I learn something new every day.



Everyday: ordinary.

Example: These are my everyday clothes.


Circle the correct word usage in the following sentence:

I can’t believe you are going to eat carrots (every day everyday) for lunch.


5th period they’re/their/there

Write a sentence using the possessive pronoun their.


6th period they’re/their/there

Choose the word or phrase that best completes the sentence.

Can you believe they chose those colors to represent ________________ school?


  1. They’re

  2. There

  3. Their

  4. Theres

7th period Every day vs. everyday



Every day: each day.

Example: I learn something new every day.



Everyday: ordinary.

Example: These are my everyday clothes.


Circle the correct word usage in the following sentence:

I make the plain white tube socks part of my (every day everyday) wardrobe for school.

Wednesday September 21st

1st period they’re/their/there

Circle the correct word usage in the following sentence:

I cannot believe (their they’re there) going to let you turn in that sloppy work.
2nd period Farther vs. Further

Farther: refers to physical distance (far).

Example: We had to walk farther than the map indicated.



Further: refers to nonphysical distance.

Examples: We need to discuss this further.

Select the correct usage in the following sentence:

Nothing could be (farther further) from the truth.


3rd period they’re/their/there

Select the correct usage in the following sentence:

You should try Maverik----I eat (they’re their there) every day after school.
4th period they’re/their/there

Select the correct word usage in the following sentence:

I don’t even think (they’re their there) going to be at the movies this Friday.

5th period Farther vs. Further



Farther: refers to physical distance (far).

Example: We had to walk farther than the map indicated.



Further: refers to nonphysical distance.

Examples: We need to discuss this further.

Select the correct usage in the following sentence:

I can’t believe you think the teacher isn’t going to discuss this (farther further) when your parents come.


6th period they’re/their/there

Select the correct word usage for the following sentence:

What in the world is ___________________ mother going to say when she finds out what they did?


  1. They’re

  2. There


  3. Their

7th period Farther vs. Further



Farther: refers to physical distance (far).

Example: We had to walk farther than the map indicated.



Further: refers to nonphysical distance.

Examples: We need to discuss this further.


Select the correct usage in the following sentence:

My feet are going to fall off if we have to walk much (further farther) on this adventure.


Thursday September 22nd

1st period Commas: let you pause and take a breath; think of commas as a soft stop.



Rule 1: Use a comma to separate two independent clauses connected by and, but, or, nor, for.

Example: Bob was usually a quiet man, but he screamed upon entering the room.

Insert commas where needed in the following sentence:

The strange man lying under the brown and worn-out table appeared to be dead or just possibly he was only napping.


2nd period Any more vs. Anymore

Any more: something additional or further.

Example: It didn’t rain any more this year than last year.



Anymore: any longer, nowadays.

Example: Harry doesn’t travel anymore.

Select the correct word usage in the sentence:

I refuse to help him do his homework (any more anymore) this session.


3rd period Commas:

Rule 2: Use a comma to separate elements in a list or series; the comma is a substitute for and.

Example: Bob tried to breathe, to keep from fainting, and to remember his first aid.

Place commas in the following sentence where needed:

Next to the man was a whistle a water balloon and a raccoon.

4th period Any more vs. Anymore


Any more: something additional or further.

Example: It didn’t rain any more this year than last year.



Anymore: any longer, nowadays.

Example: Harry doesn’t travel anymore.

Select the correct word usage in the sentence:

I am shocked at how minimum wage doesn’t seem to help pay the bills (anymore any more).


5th period Commas

Insert commas where needed in the following sentence:

At Horizonte we aren’t allowed to swear use cell phones in class and use inappropriate language.
6th period Any more vs. Anymore

Any more: something additional or further.

Example: It didn’t rain any more this year than last year.



Anymore: any longer, nowadays.

Example: Harry doesn’t travel anymore.

Select the correct word usage in the sentence:

Will you be able to bring your poetry notebook to share your writing in class (anymore any more)?


7th period Commas

Insert commas where needed in the following sentence:

Hey Maria can you come in here into the lab and help me fix this assignment?

Friday September 23rd

1st period All together vs. Altogether

All together: refers to a group; all of us or all of them together.

Example: It is wonderful to be all together to celebrate the holidays.


Altogether: entirely.

Example: It is not altogether his fault he couldn’t make it.

Select the correct word usage in the sentence:

I don’t think we can place blame (all together altogether) on her just because she isn’t here to defend herself.

2nd period Farther vs. Further

Select the correct word usage in the following sentence:

I swear we traveled (further farther) than you did in order to get our scavenger hunt items.

3rd period All together vs. Altogether

All together: refers to a group; all of us or all of them together.

Example: It is wonderful to be all together to celebrate the holidays.



Altogether: entirely.

Example: It is not altogether his fault he couldn’t make it.


Select the correct word usage in the sentence:

Class, we’re going to head down to the library (all together altogether).


4th period Any more vs. Anymore

Select the correct word usage in the following sentence:

I really don’t think we can handle (anymore any more) reading in English class.
5th period Every day vs. everyday

Select the correct word usage in the following sentence:

I like the more (every day everyday) heroes like firefighters or policemen over the fictional comic book heroes.
6th period they’re/their/there

Write a sentence correctly using all 3 of the words: they’re their there

7th period All together vs. Altogether

All together: refers to a group; all of us or all of them together.

Example: It is wonderful to be all together to celebrate the holidays.



Altogether: entirely.

Example: It is not altogether his fault he couldn’t make it.


Select the correct word usage in the sentence:

I would not (all together altogether) believe him if he tries to tell you that story again.




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