Reading Power Assessment Rubric



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Not Meeting

Minimally Meeting

Meeting

Fully Meeting

Exceeding

Making Connections

I don’t have any connections to the story.


I am only able to make a quick connection to the story: "That reminds me of my dog. I have a dog too." These connections are often to illustrations and are often not connected to the theme of the story story. My connections do little to help me understand the story better


My connections are not all “quick” and I’m beginning to find connections that will help me with the meaning of the story. My connections are detailed, but are often re-counts of events and do not include feelings or emotion.

I can make deeper connections to my personal experience and use my experience to make the story more meaningful. My connections are closely tied to the story (BIBB) The connections are often attached to an emotion: "That reminds me of the time I felt embarrassed because…" OR - I may not be able to identify a direct connection but am able to explain an indirect connection: "I can't make a connection to this book exactly because I'm an only child, but sometimes my cousin and I can get into arguments like the brothers in this book do."



My experiences help me connect to the story and make the story more meaningful. I may even connect to other people's experiences or other things I've seen or read. (T-S, T-T, T-W). I am also able to articulate how the connection I made has helped me to understand the story better. ("B.I.B." - Bring It Back to the story): “My connection is the feeling of being super nervous about doing something for the first time. I remember when I was pitching my first little league game and I was so afraid that I was going to mess up. This connection really helps me understand how nervous the character in this book must have been feeling when he was performing his dance routine for the first time."






Not Meeting

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Exceeding

Questioning

I am not able to formulate questions before, during or after I’m reading the story.

I am able to formulate some questions while I read, but the questions are “quick questions” (literal) and often are not related to the context of the story: “I wonder if dogs like to eat pizza?”

I am able to ask questions before, during and after reading. I am asking both “quick” (literal) and “deep thinking” (inferential) questions. Most of my questions relate to predictions and content, but some are helping me go deeper into the meaning of the story. I am able to answer a literal question with a statement and a deeper thinking question with an “I think….”



I know the difference between a quick (literal) and a deep thinking (inferential) question and am able to ask both before, during and after reading. The questions I ask are relevant to the story and help me learn a lot more about the meaning. When I answer these deeper questions, I am able to clearly show my thinking in my answers. I am able to explain why the questions will help me with my understanding.

The questions I ask before, during and after reading a story help me to think beyond the literal interpretation and evaluate the deeper meaning and/or the author’s intent. My questions are relevant to the story and encourage debate and discussion. I am able to explain how my questions have helped me with my understanding of the story.






Not Meeting

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Meeting

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Exceeding

Visualizing

I can't tell you what I see when I read.

I am able to record or describe one or two images from the text but they do little to help me with the meaning of the story. My images come from the exact words or pictures in the book.

The words from the text help me to create images in my mind. I am able to identify some of the “picture words” or phrases in the text that helped to develop my images. I am beginning to include my other senses into my visual images, such as sound words or feelings.



My images go beyond what I see. I am now using my other senses to interpret text. They might be about what I hear, feel, taste and smell too. I can tell why they are important. I am also able to identify “picture words” that helped to develop my images. I’m also aware that my personal experiences support my visualizing.

I understand that visualizing helps me to understand the story better. I am able to describe or sketch images from the story and identify those words which helped me develop the images. I am using all my senses when I visualize. I am able to identify which particular passages in a text evoke images because of the words the author used.






Not Meeting

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Meeting

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Exceeding

Inferring

I am unable to make inferences. I have difficulty understanding anything beyond what is included directly in the text.


I am able to think beyond the story by making a prediction. “I’m inferring that this is what is going to happen next.” I have difficulty using the clues in the text to infer anything other than a prediction.


I am able to recognize in books provided that sometimes an author does not include everything in the story and that inferring is “adding my maybes” to the book. Sometimes my inferences (“maybes”) are connected to the story and sometimes they aren’t.



I understand that not all authors tell you everything. I am able to use clues in the book (illustrations and/or text) PLUS my own experiences to “fill in” what the author didn’t say. My “maybes” are relevant to the story and show that I am thinking beyond the text to find meaning. I am also beginning to use the word “infer” in situations other than reading.


See Fully Meeting PLUS:

I demonstrate a strong understanding of the concept of inferring. I am able to infer not only in selected texts, but am able to apply this strategy to other texts. My inferences are strongly related to the text, use evidence from the text and demonstrate that I am thinking beyond the story and looking for deeper meaning. I am also able to infer author’s intent. “I’m inferring that the author probably wanted me to know that...”








Not Meeting

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Meeting

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Exceeding

Transforming

I am not able to include any new thinking that I have gained from the story. I am retelling the story rather than re-thinking the story.


I am able to re-tell parts of the story and include some quick questions and connections about the story.

I am able to use some of my Reading Power strategies while I read. I understand the idea of a “change in thinking” but my new thoughts are not always connected to the story. They might be a “new fact” as opposed to a new way of thinking about something.


I am able to think through the story by applying the Reading Power strategies. I may make a connection, ask a question, or make an inference. I am also able to identify the strategy I’m using by a code or by talking about it. At the end of the story, I am able to write a “thought that is sticking.” I understand that this Transformed thought is not anything that the author wrote directly in the text, but it is now something that I’m thinking about.


See Fully Meeting PLUS:

I am able to distinguish between the author’s story and my own thinking. I use my own experiences and the author’s story to come up with a new perspective or new way of thinking about something. This “new thought” is connected to the meaning of the story and often answers the question: “Why do I think the author wrote this book? What thought will stay with me after I finished reading this book?”



I understand fully the difference between a “re-telling” and a “re-thinking” of the story.







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