Reception



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Pie Corbett’s teaching guide for progression in writing year by year Handout 1: Curriculum overview

developed with the South2together writing project
Note: In the Punctuation & Terminology columns any terms in bold are a statutory requirement of the National Curriculum in England


Reception

Text Structure

Sentence Construction

Word Structure / Language

Punctuation*

Terminology*

Introduce:

Planning Tool –Story map /story mountain
Whole class retelling of story
Understanding of beginning/ middle / end
Retell simple 5-part story:

Once upon a time

First / Then / Next

But


So

Finally,…..happily ever after
Non-fiction:

Factual writing closely linked to a story

Simple factual sentences based around a theme

Names


Labels

Captions


Lists

Diagrams


Message


Introduce:

Simple sentences
Simple Connectives:

and

who


until


but

Say a sentence, write and read it back to check it makes sense.
Compound sentences using connectives (coordinating conjunctions)

and / but

-‘ly’ openers


Luckily / Unfortunately,
Run’ - Repetition for rhythm:

e.g.


He walked and he walked

Repetition in description e.g.

a lean cat, a mean cat



Introduce:

Determiners

the

a

my


your

an

this

that

his

her

their

some

all

Prepositions:

up

down

in

into

out

to

onto

Adjectives e.g. old, little, big, small, quiet

Adverbs e.g. luckily, unfortunately, fortunately

Similes – using ‘like’

Introduce:

Finger spaces


Full stops
Capital letters

Introduce:

Finger spaces


Letter
Word
Sentence
Full stops
Capital letter
Simile – ‘like’

Year 1

Text Structure

Sentence Construction

Word Structure/Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Consolidate Reception list

Introduce:
Fiction:
Planning Tools: Story map / story mountain

(Refer to Story-Type grids)


Plan opening around character(s), setting, time of day and type of weather
Understanding - beginning /middle /end to a story

Understanding - 5 parts to a story:
Opening

Once upon a time…
Build-up

One day…
Problem / Dilemma

Suddenly,../ Unfortunately,…
Resolution

Fortunately,…
Ending

Finally,….

Non-fiction:

(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)
Planning tools:

text map / washing line


Heading
Introduction

Opening factual statement


Middle section(s)

Simple factual sentences around a them


Bullet points for instructions
Labelled diagrams
Ending

Concluding sentence





Consolidate Reception list

(See Connectives and Sentence Signposts doc.)

Introduce:

Types of sentences:

Statements

Questions

Exclamations


Simple Connectives:

and

or

but

so

because

so that

then

that

while

when

where

Also as openers:

While…

When…

Where…

-‘ly’ openers

Fortunately,…Unfortunately, Sadly,…


Simple sentences e.g.

I went to the park.

The castle is haunted.

Embellished simple sentences using adjectives e.g.

The giant had an enormous beard.

Red squirrels enjoy eating delicious nuts.
Compound sentences using connectives (coordinating conjunctions)

and/or/ but/so e.g.



The children played on the swings and slid down the slide.

Spiders can be small or they can be large.

Charlie hid but Sally found him.

It was raining so they put on their coats.
Complex sentences:

Use of ‘who’ (relative clause)

e.g.


Once upon a time there was a little old woman who lived in a forest.

There are many children who like to eat ice cream.
Run’ - Repetition for rhythm e.g.

He walked and he walked and he walked.
Repetition for description

e.g.


a lean cat, a mean cat

a green dragon, a fiery dragon


Consolidate Reception list
Introduce:

Prepositions:

inside

outside

towards

across

under
Determiners:

the a my your an this that his her their some all lots of many more those these
Adjectives to describe

e.g. The old house…



The huge elephant…
Alliteration

e.g. dangerous dragon



slimy snake
Similes using as….as…

e.g. as tall as a house



as red as a radish

Precise, clear language to give information e.g.


First, switch on the red button.

Next, wait for the green light to flash...


Regular plural noun suffixes –s or –es

(e.g. dog, dogs; wish, wishes)
Suffixes that can be added to verbs (e.g. helping, helped, helper)
How the prefix un– changes the meaning of verbs and adjectives

(negation, e.g. unkind, or undoing, e.g. untie the boat)


Consolidate Reception list
Introduce:

Capital Letters:



Capital letter for names
Capital letter for the personal pronoun I
Full stops
Question marks
Exclamation marks
Speech bubble
Bullet points


Consolidate:
Finger spaces
Letter
Word
Sentence
Full stops
Capital letter
Simile – ‘like’

Introduce:
Punctuation
Question mark
Exclamation mark
Speech bubble
Bullet points
Singular/ plural

Adjective


Verbs
Connective
Alliteration
Simile – ‘as’

Year 2

Text Structure

Sentence Construction

Word Structure/Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Consolidate Year 1 list

Introduce:
Fiction

Secure use of planning tools: Story map / story mountain / story grids/ ’Boxing-up’ grid

(Refer to Story Types grids)


Plan opening around character(s), setting, time of day and type of weather
Understanding 5 parts to a story with more complex vocabulary
Opening e.g.

In a land far away….

One cold but bright morning…..

Build-up e.g.

Later that day

Problem / Dilemma e.g.

To his amazement

Resolution e.g.

As soon as

Ending e.g.

Luckily, Fortunately,

Ending should be a section rather than one final sentence e.g. suggest how the main character is feeling in the final situation.


Non-Fiction

(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)
Introduce:

Secure use of planning tools: Text map / washing line / ‘Boxing –up’ grid

Introduction: Heading

Hook to engage reader Factual statement / definition

Opening question
Middle section(s)

Group related ideas / facts into sections

Sub headings to introduce sentences /sections

Use of lists – what is needed / lists of steps to be taken Bullet points for facts Diagrams Ending Make final comment to reader Extra tips! / Did-you-know? facts / True or false?

The consistent use of present tense versus past tense throughout texts

Use of the continuous form of verbs in the present and past tense to mark actions in progress (e.g. she is drumming, he was shouting)


Consolidate Year 1 list

Introduce:

(See Connectives and Sentence Signposts doc.)
Types of sentences:

Statements

Questions

Exclamations

Commands
-‘ly’ starters

e.g. Usually, Eventually, Finally, Carefully, Slowly, …


Vary openers to sentences
Embellished simple sentences using:

adjectives e.g. The boys peeped inside the dark cave.

adverbs e.g. Tom ran quickly down the hill.
Secure use of compound sentences (Coordination) using connectives:

and/ or / but / so

(coordinating conjunctions)


Complex sentences (Subordination) using:

Drop in a relative clause:

who/which e.g.

Sam, who was lost, sat down and cried.


The Vikings, who came from Scandinavia, invaded Scotland.
The Fire of London, which started in Pudding Lane, spread quickly.
Additional subordinating conjunctions:

what/while/when/where/ because/ then/so that/ if/to/until

e.g. While the animals were munching breakfast, two visitors arrived



During the Autumn, when the weather is cold, the leaves fall off the trees.
Use long and short sentences:

Long sentences to add description or information. Use short sentences for emphasis.


Expanded noun phrases

e.g. lots of people, plenty of food



List of 3 for description

e.g. He wore old shoes, a dark cloak and a red hat.


African elephants have long trunks, curly tusks and large ears.

Consolidate Year 1 list


Introduce:
Prepositions:

behind above along before between after
Alliteration

e.g. wicked witch



slimy slugs
Similes using…like…

e.g.


like sizzling sausages

hot like a fire


Two adjectives to describe the noun

e.g.


The scary, old woman…

Squirrels have long, bushy tails.
Adverbs for description

e.g.


Snow fell gently and covered the cottage in the wood.
Adverbs for information e.g.

Lift the pot carefully onto the tray.

The river quickly flooded the town.
Generalisers for information, e.g.

Most dogs….

Some cats….
Formation of nouns using suffixes such as –ness, –er
Formation of adjectives
using suffixes such as –ful, –less
(A fuller list of suffixes can be found in the spelling appendix.)
Use of the suffixes –er and –est to form comparisons of adjectives and adverbs


Consolidate Year 1 list

Introduce:
Demarcate sentences:

Capital letters


Full stops
Question marks
Exclamation marks
Commas to separate items in a list
Comma after –ly opener

e.g. Fortunately,….Slowly,….


Speech bubbles /speech marks for direct speech
Apostrophes to mark contracted forms in spelling

e.g. don’t, can’t



Apostrophes to mark singular possession e.g. the cat’s name

Consolidate:
Punctuation

  • Finger spaces


  • Letter

  • Word

  • Sentence

  • Full stops

  • Capital letter

  • Question mark

  • Exclamation mark

  • Speech bubble

  • Bullet points


Singular/ plural
Adjective

Verb


Connective

Alliteration

Simile – ‘as’/ ‘like’
Introduce:
Apostrophe (contractions and singular possession)
Commas for description
Speech marks’
Suffix
Verb / adverb
Statement
question
exclamation


Command (Bossy verbs)
Tense (past, present, future) ie not in bold
Adjective / noun
Noun phrases
Generalisers


Year 3

Text Structure

Sentence Construction

Word / Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Consolidate Year 2 list

Introduce:
Fiction

Secure use of planning tools: Story map /story mountain / story grids / ‘Boxing-up’ grid

(Refer to Story-Type grids)

Plan opening around character(s), setting, time of day and type of weather

Paragraphs to organise ideas into each story part
Extended vocabulary to introduce 5 story parts:

Introduction –should include detailed description of setting or characters

Build-up –build in some suspense towards the problem or dilemma

Problem / Dilemma –include detail of actions / dialogue

Resolution - should link with the problem

Ending – clear ending should link back to the start, show how the character is feeling, how the character or situation has changed from the beginning.
Non-Fiction

(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)
Introduce:

Secure use of planning tools:

e.g. Text map, washing line, ‘Boxing –up’ grid, story grids



Paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme

Introduction Develop hook to introduce and tempt reader in e.g. Who….? What….? Where….?

Why….? When….? How….?

Middle Section(s)

Group related ideas /facts into paragraphs

Sub headings to introduce sections / paragraphs

Topic sentences to introduce paragraphs Lists of steps to be taken


Bullet points for facts Flow diagram Develop Ending Personal response Extra information / reminders e.g. Information boxes/ Five Amazing Facts Wow comment
Use of the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause e.g. I have written it down so I can check what it said. Use of present perfect instead of simple past. He has left his hat behind, as opposed to He left his hat behind.

Consolidate Year 2 list

Introduce:
Vary long and short sentences:

Long sentences to add description or information.


Short sentences for emphasis and making key points e.g.

Sam was really unhappy.

Visit the farm now.
Embellished simple sentences:

Adverb starters to add detail e.g.

Carefully, she crawled along the floor of the cave….

Amazingly, small insects can….



Adverbial phrases used as a ‘where’, ‘when’ or ‘how’ starter (fronted adverbials)

A few days ago, we discovered a hidden box.

At the back of the eye, is the retina.

In a strange way, he looked at me.

Prepositional phrases to place the action: on the mat; behind the tree, in the air
Compound sentences (Coordination)

using connectives:



and/ or / but / so / for /nor / yet

(coordinating conjunctions)


Develop complex sentences

(Subordination) with range of subordinating conjunctions

(See Connectives and Sentence Signposts doc.)

-‘ing’ clauses as starters e.g.

Sighing, the boy finished his homework.

Grunting, the pig lay down to sleep.
Drop in a relative clause using: who/whom/which/whose/

that e.g.

The girl, whom I remember,

had long black hair.

The boy, whose name is George, thinks he is very brave.

The Clifton Suspension bridge, which was finished in 1864,is a popular tourist attraction.
Sentence of 3 for description e.g.
The cottage was almost invisible, hiding under a thick layer of snow and glistening in the sunlight.

Rainbow dragons are covered with many different coloured scales, have enormous, red eyes and swim on the surface of the water.

Pattern of 3 for persuasion e.g.
Visit, Swim, Enjoy!
Topic sentences to introduce non-fiction paragraphs e.g.

Dragons are found across the world.

Dialogue –powerful speech verb

e.g. “Hello,” she whispered.



Consolidate Year 2 list
Introduce:
Prepositions

Next to by the side of

In front of during through throughout because of
Powerful verbs

e.g. stare, tremble, slither


Boastful Language

e.g. magnificent, unbelievable, exciting!


More specific / technical vocabulary to add detail

e.g.


A few dragons of this variety can breathe on any creature and turn it to stone immediately.
Drops of rain pounded on the corrugated, tin roof.
Nouns formed from prefixes

e.g. auto… super…anti…
Word Families based on common words

e.g. teacher –teach,

beauty – beautiful


Use of determiners a or an according to whether next word begins with a vowel

e.g. a rock, an open box


Consolidate Year 2 list

Introduce:
Colon before a list e.g. What you need:
Ellipses to keep the reader hanging on
Secure use of inverted commas for direct speech
Use of commas after fronted adverbials (e.g. Later that day, I heard the bad news.)


Consolidate:
Punctuation

  • Finger spaces

  • Letter


  • Word

  • Sentence

  • Statement
    question
    exclamation


Command

  • Full stops

  • Capital letter

  • Question mark

  • Exclamation mark

  • Speech bubble

  • Speech marks’

  • Bullet points

  • Apostrophe (contractions only)

  • Commas for sentence of 3 - description


Singular/ plural

Suffix
Adjective / noun / Noun phrases Verb / adverb
Bossy verbs

Tense (past, present, future)

Connective

Generalisers
Alliteration

Simile – ‘as’/ ‘like’



Introduce:

  • Word family

  • Conjunction

  • Adverb

  • Preposition

  • Direct speech

  • Inverted commas

  • Prefix

  • Consonant/Vowel

  • Clause

  • Subordinate clause

  • Determiner

  • Synonyms

  • Relative clause

  • Relative pronoun

  • Imperative

  • Colon for instructions



Year 4

Text Structure

Sentence Construction


Word Structure/ Language

Punctuation

Terminology


Consolidate Year 3 list

Introduce:

Secure use of planning tools: e.g. story map /story mountain /story grids /’Boxing-up’ grids

(Refer to Story Types grids)


Plan opening using:

Description /action


Paragraphs: to organise each part of story to indicate a change in place or jump in time

Build in suspense writing to introduce the dilemma



Developed 5 parts to story Introduction Build-up Problem / Dilemma Resolution Ending

Clear distinction between resolution and ending. Ending should include reflection on events or the characters.




Non-Fiction

(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)

Introduce: Secure use of planning tools: Text map/ washing line/ ‘Boxing –up’ grid
Paragraphs to organise ideas around a theme

Logical organisation

Group related paragraphs

Develop use of a topic sentence

Link information within paragraphs with a range of connectives.

Use of bullet points, diagrams



Introduction Middle section(s) Ending

Ending could Include personal opinion, response, extra information, reminders, question, warning, encouragement to the reader



Appropriate choice of pronoun or noun across sentences to aid cohesion

Consolidate Year 3 list

Introduce:

Standard English for verb inflections instead of local spoken forms
Long and short sentences:

Long sentences to enhance description or information
Short sentences to move events on quickly

e.g. It was midnight.



It’s great fun.
Start with a simile

e.g. As curved as a ball, the moon shone brightly in the night sky.



Like a wailing cat, the ambulance screamed down the road.
Secure use of simple / embellished simple sentences
Secure use of compound sentences (Coordination) using coordinating conjunction and / or / but / so / for / nor / yet (coordinating conjunctions)
Develop complex sentences:

(Subordination)

Main and subordinate clauses with range of subordinating conjunctions.

(See Connectives and Sentence Signposts doc.)

-‘ed’ clauses as starters e.g.

Frightened, Tom ran straight home to avoid being caught.

Exhausted, the Roman soldier collapsed at his post.
Expanded -‘ing’ clauses as starters e.g.

Grinning menacingly, he slipped the treasure into his rucksack.

Hopping speedily towards the pool, the frog dived underneath the leaves.
Drop in –‘ing’ clause e.g.

Jane, laughing at the teacher, fell off her chair.

The tornedo, sweeping across the city, destroyed the houses.
Sentence of 3 for action e.g.

Sam rushed down the road, jumped on the bus and sank into his seat.

The Romans enjoyed food, loved marching but hated the weather.
Repetition to persuade e.g.

Find us to find the fun




Dialogue - verb + adverb - “Hello,” she whispered, shyly.
Appropriate choice of pronoun or noun within a sentence to avoid ambiguity and repetition


Consolidate Year 3 list

Introduce:

Prepositions

at underneath since towards beneath beyond

Conditionals - could, should, would
Comparative and superlative adjectives

e.g. small…smaller…smallest



good…better…best
Proper nouns-refers to a particular person or thing

e.g. Monday, Jessica, October, England


The grammatical difference between plural and possessive –s
Standard English forms for verb inflections instead of local spoken forms (e.g. we were instead of we was, or I did instead of I done)

Consolidate Year 3 list
Introduce:

Commas to mark clauses and to mark off fronted adverbials
Full punctuation for direct speech: Each new speaker on a new line

Comma between direct speech and reporting clause e.g. “It’s late,” gasped Cinderella!


Apostrophes to mark singular and plural possession

(e.g. the girl’s name, the boys’ boots) as opposed to s to mark a plural





Consolidate:
Punctuation

  • Finger spaces

  • Letter

  • Word

  • Sentence

  • Statement
    question
    exclamation


Command
  • Full stops


  • Capital letter

  • Question mark

  • Exclamation mark

  • Speech bubble

  • Speech marks’

  • Direct speech

  • Inverted commas

  • Bullet points

  • Apostrophe (contractions only)

  • Commas for sentence of 3 – description, action

  • Colon - instructions


Singular/ plural

Suffix/ Prefix

Word family

Consonant/Vowel
Adjective / noun / noun phrase Verb / Adverb

Bossy verbs - imperative



Tense (past, present, future)

Connective



Conjunction

Preposition

Determiner/ generaliser

Clause

Subordinate clause

Relative clause

Relative pronoun
Alliteration

Simile – ‘as’/ ‘like’

Synonyms
Introduce:


  • Pronoun

  • Possessive pronoun

  • Adverbial

  • Fronted adverbial

  • Apostrophe – plural possession



Year 5

Text Structure

Sentence Construction


Word Structure / Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Consolidate Year 4 list
Introduce:

Secure independent use of planning tools

Story mountain /grids/flow diagrams



(Refer to Story Types grids)
Plan opening using:

Description /action/dialogue


Paragraphs: Vary connectives within paragraphs to build cohesion into a paragraph

Use change of place, time and action to link ideas across paragraphs.


Use 5 part story structure

Writing could start at any of the 5 points.

This may include flashbacks

Introduction –should include action / description -character or setting / dialogue

Build-up –develop suspense techniques

Problem / Dilemma –may be more than one problem to be resolved

Resolution –clear links with dilemma

Ending –character could reflect on events, any changes or lessons, look forward to the future ask a question.
Non-Fiction
(Refer to Connectives and Sentence Signposts document for Introduction and Endings)

Introduce:

Independent planning across all genres and application

Secure use of range of layouts suitable to text.



Structure:
Introduction / Middle / Ending

Secure use of paragraphs: Use a variety of ways to open texts and draw reader in and make the purpose clear
Link ideas within and across paragraphs using a full range of connectives and signposts Use rhetorical questions to draw reader in

Express own opinions clearly

Consistently maintain viewpoint

Summary clear at the end to appeal directly to the reader


Consolidate Year 4 list


Introduce:

Relative clauses beginning with who, which, that, where, when, whose or an omitted relative pronoun.
Secure use of simple / embellished simple sentences
Secure use of compound sentences
Develop complex sentences:

(Subordination)

Main and subordinate clauses with full range of conjunctions:

(See Connectives and Sentence Signposts doc.)
Expanded –ed clauses as starters e.g.

Encouraged by the bright weather, Jane set out for a long walk.

Terrified by the dragon, George fell to his knees.
Elaboration of starters using adverbial phrases e.g.

Beyond the dark gloom of the cave, Zach saw the wizard move.

Throughout the night, the wind howled like an injured creature.
Drop in –‘ed’ clause e.g.

Poor Tim, exhausted by so much effort, ran home.

The lesser known Bristol dragon, recognised by purple spots, is rarely seen.
Sentence reshaping techniques

e.g. lengthening or shortening sentence for meaning and /or effect


Moving sentence chunks (how, when, where) around for different effects e.g.

The siren echoed loudly ….through the lonely streets ….at midnight
Use of rhetorical questions
Stage directions in speech (speech + verb + action) e.g. “Stop!” he shouted, picking up the stick and running after the thief.
Indicating degrees of possibility using modal verbs (e.g. might, should, will, must) or adverbs (perhaps, surely)

Consolidate Year 4 list
Introduce:
Metaphor
Personification
Onomatopoeia

Empty words

e.g. someone, somewhere was out to get him

Developed use of technical language

Converting nouns or



adjectives into verbs using suffixes (e.g. –ate; –ise; –ify)
Verb prefixes (e.g. dis–, de–, mis–, over– and re–)

Consolidate Year 4 list
Introduce:
Rhetorical question
Dashes
Brackets/dashes/commas for parenthesis
Colons
Use of commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity

Consolidate:
Punctuation

  • Letter/ Word

  • Sentence

  • Statement
    question
    exclamation


Command

  • Full stops/ Capitals

  • Question mark

  • Exclamation mark

  • Speech marks’

  • Direct speech

  • Inverted commas

  • Bullet points

  • Apostrophe contractions/ possession

  • Commas for sentence of 3 – description, action

  • Colon – instructions

  • Parenthesis / bracket / dash


Singular/ plural

Suffix/ Prefix

Word family

Consonant/Vowel
Adjective / noun / noun phrase

Verb / Adverb

Bossy verbs - imperative



Tense (past, present, future)

Conjunction / Connective

Preposition

Determiner/ generaliser

Pronoun – relative/ possessive

Clause

Subordinate/ relative clause

Adverbial

Fronted adverbial

Alliteration

Simile – ‘as’/ ‘like’

Synonyms
Introduce:


  • Relative clause/ pronoun

  • Modal verb

  • Parenthesis

  • Bracket- dash

  • Determiner

  • Cohesion

  • Ambiguity

  • Metaphor

  • Personification

  • Onomatopoeia

  • Rhetorical question

Year 6

Text Structure


Sentence Construction

Word Structure / Language

Punctuation

Terminology

Consolidate Year 5 list
Secure independent planning across story types using 5 part story structure.

Include suspense, cliff hangers, flashbacks/forwards,

time slips

Start story at any point of the 5 part structure

Maintain plot consistently working from plan
Paragraphs -Secure use of linking ideas within and across paragraphs
Secure development of characterisation
Non-fiction:
Secure planning across non-fiction genres and application
Use a variety of text layouts appropriate to purpose

Use range of techniques to involve the reader –comments, questions, observations, rhetorical questions

Express balanced coverage of a topic

Use different techniques to conclude texts

Use appropriate formal and informal styles of writing

Choose or create publishing format to enhance text type and engage the reader

Linking ideas across paragraphs using a wider range of cohesive devices:

semantic cohesion (e.g. repetition of a word or phrase),

grammatical connections (e.g. the use of adverbials such as on the other hand, in contrast, or as a consequence), and elision

Layout devices, such as headings, sub-headings, columns, bullets, or tables, to structure text




Consolidate Year 5 list
Secure use of simple / embellished simple sentences
Secure use of compound sentences
Secure use of complex sentences:

(Subordination)

Main and subordinate clauses with full range of conjunctions:

(See Connectives and Sentence Signposts doc.)
Active and passive verbs to create effect and to affect presentation of information e.g.

Active: Tom accidently dropped the glass.

Passive: The glass was accidently dropped by Tom.

Active: The class heated the water.

Passive: The water was heated.
Developed use of rhetorical questions for persuasion

Expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely (e.g. the boy that jumped over the fence is over there, or the fact that it was raining meant the end of sports day)

The difference between structures typical of informal speech and structures appropriate for formal speech and writing (such as the use of question tags, e.g. He’s your friend, isn’t he?, or the use of the subjunctive in some very formal writing and speech) as in If I were you.


Consolidate Year 5 list
Build in literary feature to create effects e.g. alliteration, onomatopoeia, similes, metaphors
The difference between vocabulary typical of informal speech and vocabulary appropriate for formal speech and writing (e.g. said versus reported, alleged, or claimed in formal speech or writing)

How words are related as synonyms and antonyms e.g. big/ large / little



Consolidate Year 5 list
Use of the semi-colon, colon and dash to indicate a stronger subdivision of a sentence than a comma. Use of colon to introduce a list and semi-colons within lists.
Punctuation of bullet points to list information.
How hyphens can be used to avoid ambiguity (e.g. man eating shark versus man-eating shark, or recover versus re-cover)


Consolidate:
Punctuation

  • Letter/ Word

  • Sentence

  • Statement
    question
    exclamation


Command

  • Full stops/ Capitals

  • Question mark

  • Exclamation mark

  • Speech marks’

  • Direct speech

  • Inverted commas

  • Bullet points

  • Apostrophe contractions/ possession

  • Commas for sentence of 3 – description, action, views/opinions, facts

  • Colon – instructions

  • Parenthesis

  • Bracket- dash


Singular/ plural

Suffix/ Prefix

Word family

Consonant/Vowel
Adjective / noun / noun phrase

Verb / Adverb

Bossy verbs - imperative



Tense (past, present, future)

modal verb

Conjunction / Connective

Preposition

Determiner/ generaliser

Pronoun – relative/ possessive

Clause

Subordinate / relative clause

Adverbial


Fronted adverbial

Rhetorical question


Cohesion

Ambiguity

Alliteration

Simile – ‘as’/ ‘like’

Synonyms


Metaphor

Personification



Onomatopoeia
Introduce:


  • Active and passive voice

  • Subject and object

  • Hyphen

  • Synonym, antonym

  • Colon/ semi-colon

  • Bullet points

  • Ellipsis


©Pie Corbett – Updated October 2013




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