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REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES )

) S.S.


JOINT REQUEST FOR INVESTIGATION and

COMPLAINT-AFFIDAVIT

The undersigned Complainants FR. JOE DIZON, SISTER MARY JOHN MANANZAN, O.S.B., DR. PABLO R. MANALASTAS, RODOLFO NOEL I. LOZADA JR., HECTOR A. BARRIOS, GREGORIO T. FABROS, EVITA L. JIMENEZ AND ANA LEA ESCRESA-COLINA, all of legal age, Filipinos and with address at c/o Secretariat, 3/F CSWCD Bldg., Magsaysay Ave., University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101, after having been sworn in accordance with law, hereby depose and state that:




  1. On June 11, 2013 , Complainants filed an action for violations of the Anti-Graft and Corrupt Practices Act (Republic Act No. 3019) as well as provisions of other relevant criminal statutes against former Commissioners and officers of the Commission on Elections and responsible directors and officers of both SMARTMATIC-ASIA PACIFIC and SMARTMATIC –TIM. The following Respondents were impleaded in the Complaint they filed on the said date:




  1. COMELEC Commissioners and officers

i. JOSE A. R. MELO, former Chairman;

ii. RENE V. SARMIENTO, former Commissioner ;

iii. NICODEMO T. FERRER, former Commissioner;

v. ARMANDO C. VELASCO, former Commissioner;

vi. LEONARDO L. LEONIDA, former Commissioner;

viii. JOSE M. TOLENTINO, JR., Director;

ix. BARTOLOME J. SINOCRUZ JR., Director; and

x. RENATO B. GARCIA, Consultant to the Former Chairman Melo.

xi. DENIS F. VILLORENTE, Chairman, Technical Evaluation Committee (TEC)

xii. FERDINAND P. DE LEON, Member, TEC; and

xiii. REYNALDO T. SY, Member, TEC.

B. SMARTMATIC-ASIA PACIFIC and SMARTMATIC-TIM Corporation directors and/or officers:

i. CESAR FLORES, Smartmatic Asia-Pacific President, with last known address at 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines.;

ii. JULIAN C. VILLA JR., Chairman, Smartmatic TIM Corporation, with last known addresses at No. 74 JalanSetiabakti, Damansara Heights 50490, KL, Malaysia, and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines;
iii. ARMANDO R. YANES, Chief Financial Officer, Smartmatic International Corporation, with last known addresses at N°4 Stafford House, Garrison Savannah, St. Michael, Barbados W.I. BB 14038 and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines;
iv. SALVADOR P. AQUE, Senior Vice President of Total Information Management Corporation and Member of the Board of Directors of Smartmatic TIM Corporation, with last known addresses at 2250 P. Burgos St., Pasay City and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines;

vi. ALBERTO R. CASTRO, member of the Board of Directors, with last known addresses at 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines;


vii. JACINTO R. PEREZ, JR., member of the Board of Directors, with last known addresses at 1211 Consuelo St., Singalong, Manila and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines; and

viii. MARIAN IVY REYES-FAJARDO, member of the Board of Directors, with last known addresses at 71-B Tindalo St., Monte Vista Subdivision, Marikina, and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines.




  1. In this Joint Supplemental Request for Investigation and Complaint-Affidavit, the same Complainants, joined by new ones, seek to hold into account the following incumbent Commissioners of the COMELEC, for their abysmal failure to protect the sanctity of the ballot in their conduct of the May 13, 2013 elections,




  1. SIXTO SERRANO BRILLANTES JR, incumbent COMELEC Chairperson;

  2. LUCENITO NOLASCO TAGLE, incumbent COMMISSIONER and

  3. ELIAS R. YUSOPH, incumbent COMMISSIONER.




  1. While the incumbent COMELEC Commissioners may not be sued in a criminal proceeding, protected as they are by constitutional immunity, they may however be subject to an investigation by this Honorable Office for purposes of an impeachment proceeding. In this regard, Complainants invoke the Ombudsman Act (Republic Act № 6770), Section 22, viz:

Section 22. Investigatory Power — The Office of the Ombudsman shall have the power to investigate any serious misconduct in office allegedly committed by officials removable by impeachment, for the purpose of filing a verified complaint for impeachment, if warranted.

In any case, the proceedings may also later on be turned into a criminal investigation, once the said COMELEC officers retire, resign or are removed from office.

  1. Complainants also invoke the Uniform Rules on Administrative Cases (URAC) for the charges of grave misconduct and/or gross incompetence versus the COMELEC officers who are clearly responsible for the technological disaster in the 13 May 2013 national and local elections, namely:





  1. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR JOSE MARUNDAN TOLENTINO JR, PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE (PMO) Head;

  2. DEPUTY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR BARTOLOME JAVILLONAR SINOCRUZ, Acting Executive Director ;

  3. DEPUTY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR HELEN AGUILA FLORES, SPECIAL BID & AWARDS COMMITTEE (SBAC) Chairperson;

  4. DIRECTOR ESTER LOMAAD VILLAFLOR ROXAS, PMO TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP (TWG) Head; and

  5. DIRECTOR EDUARDO DULAY MEJOS, Finance Director (Intelligence Funds Liquidator).

In addition, they seek to hold the same Comelec Directors, who are not protected by constitutional immunity from suits while in office, criminally liable for violations of the relevant provisions of Republic Act 3019 and other applicable criminal statutes, along with the following Smartmatic and Smartmatic-TIM directors and/or corporate officers who were also impleaded in the original Complainant filed on June 11, 2013:


CESAR FLORES, Smartmatic Asia-Pacific President, with last known address at 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines.;
ii. JULIAN C. VILLA JR., Chairman, Smartmatic TIM Corporation, with last known addresses at No. 74 Jalan Setiabakti, Damansara Heights 50490, KL, Malaysia, and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines;

iii. ARMANDO R. YANES, Chief Financial Officer, Smartmatic International Corporation, with last known addresses at N°4 Stafford House, Garrison Savannah, St. Michael, Barbados W.I. BB 14038 and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines;

iv. SALVADOR P. AQUE, Senior Vice President of Total Information Management Corporation and Member of the Board of Directors of Smartmatic TIM Corporation, with last known addresses at 2250 P. Burgos St., Pasay City and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines;
vi. ALBERTO R. CASTRO, member of the Board of Directors, with last known addresses at 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines;
vii. JACINTO R. PEREZ, JR., member of the Board of Directors, with last known addresses at 1211 Consuelo St., Singalong, Manila and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines; and
viii. MARIAN IVY REYES-FAJARDO, member of the Board of Directors, with last known addresses at 71-B Tindalo St., Monte Vista Subdivision, Marikina, and 16th floor, Accralaw Tower, Second Avenue Corner 30th Street. Crescent Park West, Bonifacio Global City, 0399 Taguig Metro Manila, Philippines.

Background Facts




  1. Complainants adopt and incorporate with this Joint Supplemental Request for Investigation and Complaint-Affidavit by reference the factual allegations contained in the original Complaint they filed on June 11, 2013 ;




  1. Further, they adopt and incorporate into this Joint Supplemental Request for Investigation and Complaint-Affidavit the facts as recognized and/or outlined by the Supreme Court in the following decisions:



    1. Archbishop Fernando Capalla et al versus Comelec & Smartmatic, GR № 201112, 13 June 2012;


    2. Solidarity for Sovereignty (S4S) et al versus Comelec & Smartmatic, GR № 201121, 13 June 2012;

    3. Tanggulang Demokrasya (TANDEM) et al versus Comelec & Smartmatic, GR № 201413, 13 June 2012;




  1. In the said decisions, and also in concurring and dissenting opinions found in the decisions, it is obvious that corporate directors and/or officers of SMARMATIC-ASIA PACIFIC and SMARTMATIC-TIM, with the connivance of their cohorts in the COMELEC, kept the Supreme Court in total darkness about the true owners of the PCOS technology and the problems such fact entailed.




  1. It is indeed a wonder why, despite the problems encountered by COMELEC in the use of the PCOS technology, the Respondents - Brillantes et al., - insisted on using it for the May 13, 2013 mid-term elections.



  1. In fact, on June 30, 2010, or a little more than one month after the May 20, 2010 elections, the COMELEC’s Advisory Council recommended to the poll body not to make use of PCOS technology again in any elections.



  1. The “Option to Purchase” PCOS machines clause in the 2009 Contract between Comelec and machine manufacturer Smartmatic-Tim Corp – was to expire on Dec 31, 2010.



  1. Yet despite this, the SMARTMATIC-ASIA PACIFIC SMARTMATIC-TIM corporate directors and/or officers who are Respondents in this caecontinued to offer to sell the PCOS machines to COMELEC.


  1. On January 12, 2012, the Advisory Council issued Resolution № 2012001, recommending against the re-use of the PCOS machines for the May 13, 2013 mid-term elections.




  1. However, COMELEC Commissioners Brillantes, Tagle and Yusoph, in conspiracy with COMELEC directors/officers Tolentino, Sinocruz, Flores, Roxas and Mejos rejected the Advisory Council’s recommendation.



  1. Instead, on March 30, 2012, the above-named COMELEC Commissioners issued Resolutions № 9376 and 9377 and 9378 approving the purchase of the PCOS machines for the May 13, 2013 mid-term elections.




  1. On September 11, 2012 SMARTMATIC-ASIA PACIFIC’s principals filed the following verified complaint in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware versus Dominion Voting System:









  1. For clarity, below is an extended excerpt from a newspaper of general circulation, The Philippine Star, 1 reporting on the case by Smartmatic versus Dominion Voting System in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware: 2

It appears that the US-based Dominion Voting Systems, which supplied the election technology to Smartmatic for the Philippine elections, terminated its 2009 license agreement with the latter on May 23, 2012. As a result, the termination denies Smartmatic access to technical support and assistance as well as Dominion’s proprietary source code and other “escrowed materials” which are vital to correcting and “enhancing” the PCOS system upon request of Comelec in March this year. Failure to correct the PCOS system’s program errors and bugs may doom the scheduled 2013 mid-term elections. Dominion is the real owner of the election technology — a fact Smartmatic hid during the 2010 elections. With the contract terminated all claims of Smartmatic that they corrected the errors is untrue. It cannot correct the PCOS errors and defects that are causing erratic counting, among other problems.

It took a legal fight between Dominion and Smartmatic to get at the facts of just what happened in 2010. Smartmatic has had to admit system errors of its technology in the compact flash card fiasco during the May 3, 2010 final testing and sealing or a week before the May 2010 elections in the Philippines. It blamed Dominion’s software for failing to correctly read and record the paper ballots. The Venezuelan company accused Dominion of breaking the 2009 license agreement by failing to deliver “fully functional technology” for the 2010 Philippine elections, and failing to place in escrow the required source code, hardware design, and manufacturing data. This is an explicit admission by Smartmatic of the failure of its system to function fully, resulting in glaring errors. The Delaware lawsuit was the opening needed by concerned citizens. Moreover, the original licensing agreement between the two companies only allows Smartmatic the use of the technology in the Philippines in 2010. There is no clear explicit provision whether its use is allowed in the 2013 elections.



  1. The immediate implications of this revelation are profound.




  1. The COMELEC opted to purchase the same technology for the May 13, 2013 mid-term elections.




  1. Yet, because DOMINION now refused to grant to SMARTMATIC access to the technology it had developed, SMARTMATIC had no choice but to deploy yet again the same machines used in the May 10, 2010 elections –now already three years old – to sell to COMELEC, to the great injury of the sanctity and integrity of the ballot in the Philippines.


  1. There were strong indications that these machines were not, properly inventoried, nor were they at least checked and repaired for defects:





  1. There were two official mock elections held to test the PCOS. The first was held on 24 July 2012 in the House of Representatives, using the best available PCOS and under the best environmental conditions; that is, dry indoor luxury plus temperature comfortable to humans and ideal to PCOS.3 The second was held on 02 February 2013 using the best available PCOS and under realistic environmental conditions.



  1. Unfortunately, both mock polls were full of embarrassing glitches. 4 No less than the COMELEC Chairman himself, Sixto Serrano Brillantes, together with numerous other high-ranking Comelec officials, saw with their own eyes the unreliability of the best available PCOS. Since that batch of PCOS represents Smartmatic’s crème of the crop, how much worse then are the conditions of all the other PCOS which voters will use on 13 May 2013 nationwide?



  1. The defects were so glaring that the Board of Election Inspectors (BEI) or “Teachers” were forced to improvise, using common school children’s pencils to serve as rolling pins for thermal papers, as can be seen in tis visibly upsetting front page headline picture of the newspaper Manila Bulletin: 5


20130203 manila bulletin headlines.png


  1. It thus came as no surprise that people clamored for more mock elections to practice rectifying the glitches. 6



  1. The Joint Congressional Oversight Committee (JCOC) under the Election Automation Law (Republic Act № 9369) held a hearing on Wednesday 06 February 2013 to investigate the dismal mock election which Comelec and Smartmatic describe as “not perfect” 7 while countless many others demanded more tests.




  1. Yet COMELEC and SMARTMATIC refused to carry out more rounds of mock elections on the lame excuse that a positive review by a certain Technical Evaluation Committee was enough. 8



  1. After pinning the blame on teachers, SMARTMATIC officials had the gall to blame the glitches to voters who expressed their vote by means of a shade appearing like a smiley inside one of the ballot ovals. 9 They made a mockery of the mock elections, according to one Comelec official. 10




  1. Unfortunately, the results were still the same for those shades that were 100% regular: either the PCOS kept on rejecting the ballots or the count was inaccurate for those ballots that were lucky enough to be read by the PCOS machine used in the mock polls.



  1. Indeed, the accuracy ratings of the PCOS machines in the mock polls were even worse than that reached by the machines during the May 10, 2010 elections.



  1. To recall, according to COMELEC requirements and specifications, the PCOS machines to be used in the Automated Elections of 2010 need to have accuracy rate of 99.995% or higher. This is provided for in the Terms of Reference of the bidding for the automated election of 2010. The required accuracy rate means that of only 1 vote out of every 20,000 case may be miscounted.



  1. But in a study conducted by Dr. Felix P. Muga II, it was found that the accuracy rating of the SMARTMATIC-PCOS machines is way below the standard set forth by the COMELEC.


  1. The results of the Random Manual Audit (RMA) commissioned by the COMELEC itself after the 2010 elections, held in June and July of that year, found that the PCOS machines only had an accuracy rating of 99.6%. This means that the PCOS machines had 80 miscounts for every 20,000 voting marks that it appreciated.




  1. In the 2012 mock elections, the accuracy rating shown by the PCOS machines was only 97.215%. Whereas in 2010 the PCOS machines had 80 miscounts per 20,000 votes, in 2012, the miscounts rose to 557 per 20,000 votes.



  1. This is in clear violation of the COMELEC Terms of Reference for the purchase of the PCOS machines which provides for a 99.995% accuracy rating.



  1. The important point here is that, as can be seen in the mutual admissions in the charges and countercharges exchanged between SMARTMATIC and DOMINION, there are serious problems in the PCOS technology of DOMINION which SMARTMATIC sold to Comelec. 11



  1. Incumbent COMELEC Commissioners Brillantes et al., knew about the problems encountered by the Filipino electorate in the use of the PCOS technology during the May 13, 2013 elections;



  1. They knew about the troubling short cuts taken by their predecessors who approved its use in the same elections;



  1. They knew about the new legal and technical troubles faced by SMARTMATIC in its newly-arisen licensing conflict with DOMINION;



  1. They also knew that SMARTMATIC no longer had legal access to the PCOS technology as its license to the technology had expired and was not renewed by DOMINION;



  1. By parity of reason, they also knew that all that SMARTMATIC had were old PCOS machines used in the May 10, 2013 elections, with little or no provision for spare parts needed to refurbish or otherwise repair the used machines.


  1. Yet, in supreme betrayal of public trust, if not high criminal complicity, the Respondents who are incumbent COMELEC Commissioners and officers, in conspiracy with SMARTMATIC-ASIA PACIFIC and SMARTMATIC–TIM corporate directors and/or officers pushed for the purchase by the government of the same highly-problematic automated elections technology .




  1. Moreover, in conspiracy with one another, as was done in the May 13, 2010 elections, Respondents removed or caused to be removed the safeguards provided by law in the implementation of an automated elections, to the extreme prejudice of the Filipino electorate.



  1. They made the same highly questioning short cuts taken by their predecessors in the May 10, 2010 elections, placing under serious cloud the sanctity and the integrity of the May 13, 2013 mid-term elections.




  1. Come Election Day of 13 May 2013, the massive glitches caused by old and defective PCOS machines proved disastrous:



http://hronlineph.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/rappler_logo.jpg

PCOS glitches hound elections

BY PURPLE ROMERO

POSTED: 2013/05/13/2:05 PM | UPDATED 2013/05/13/6:30 PM


http://www.rappler.com/nation/politics/elections-2013/29041-pcos-glitches-hound-elections

defective pcos machines=long lines. voting in a precinct in cagayan de oro was stalled due to defective pcos machines. photo by jerome jungco

DEFECTIVE PCOS MACHINES = LONG LINES. Photo by Jerome Jungco

Voting in a precinct in Cagayan de Oro was stalled due to defective PCOS machines.

MANILA, Philippines - [2ND UPDATE] Glitches in the Precinct Count Optical Scan (PCOS) machines have caused difficulties in voting in some areas in the country on Monday, May 13. According to a Comelec projection, 200 PCOS machines may have defects, Comelec chairman Sixto Brillantes said. Rappler gathered details on these from reports on the ground and verified posts on social media:

Luzon: In Quirino Elementary School in Project 2, Quezon City, PCOS machines for precincts 3947 to 3950 stopped working in the afternoon. Election Supervisor Vergie Monteverde said they counted 271 votes and will use other working PCOS machines from other precincts to transmit the votes. Comelec officer Chona Larupay told Rappler that about 1,000 voters in Taguig's cluster 38 at Bagumbayan Elementary failed to feed their ballots into the PCOS machines after the board of election inspectors failed to reset the count in the PCOS machine to zero. In Manila, a PCOS machine in Padre Burgos Elementary School stopped working after reading 21 ballots. Another PCOS machine in a polling cluster in Aurora Quezon Elementary School in San Andres, Manila also malfunctioned. Election inspector Susana Oppura said the machine assigned to voters of Barangay 703 under precincts 2772 A and B did not read the ballots. Fourteen PCOS machines did not work in Ibaan, Santo Tomas, Lemery, San Pascual, San Nicolas, Mabini, Laurel, Balete, Batangas City, Tanauan, Nasugbu, San Jose, San Juan and Padre Garcia, all in Batangas. In Pampanga, voters in Clustered Precinct #15 in Barangay Concepcion were not able to feed their ballots into a PCOS machine after it malfunctioned, when the back-up memory card for it was inserted, PCOS technician Karen Catu said. Polling in some precincts in Alaminos, San Pablo in Laguna was temporarily cancelled because of failure of PCOS machines. In Bicol, the army reported that at least 34 out of 5539 PCOS machines have glitches. PCOS malfunction was also reported in Sagrada, Tinambac in Camarines Sur.

Visayas: 5 PCOS Machines failed to work in Talisay City in Cebu for an hour.

Mindanao: Voting was suspended for more than 20 minutes in cluster Precincts 78-79 in Barangay Apopong, General Santos City after the PCOS machine briefly malfunctioned at around 9:30 in the morning. Voting however resumed after it was repaired. The same problem occurred in Precinct 254 in Lagao at 12 noon. The PPCRV said voting was delayed in a precinct in Isabela East Central Elementary School due to glitches of 2 PCOS machines. The Philippine Information Agency reported there are 3 identified defective PCOS machines in 3 barangays in Binuangan town in Misamis Oriental. Defective PCOS machines in Central School-Cagayan de Oro City have led to congested voting lines. In Cagayan de Oro, there were 26 PCOS machines that failed to work the in precincts of Bulua, Misamis Oriental General Comprehensive High School, Carmen, Kauswagan and Lumbia. Technicians were able to fix 18 of the machines. The rest of the PCOS machines would be replaced.


Katherine Visconti, Edwin Espejo, Ace Tamayo, Rappler Research Team, Move ambassadors



  1. Below are pictures of voter disenfranchisement by machine breakdown.


http://proxy.storify.com/?url=http%3a%2f%2fpbs.twimg.com%2fmedia%2fbkihv4hcuaahveh.jpg

Halos isang oras na nasira ang isang PCOS machine sa Sucat, Muntinlupa kaninang umaga. Kuha ni YouScooper @adsibal pic.twitter.com/BQj0HXNBgW


http://proxy.storify.com/?url=http%3a%2f%2fpbs.twimg.com%2fmedia%2fbkh1_4wcmaelo86.jpg

Medyo nakakaworry ito. Hindi gumagana ang PCOS machine sa precint 4188A sa Quezon City. #eleksyon2013 pic.twitter.com/iRHRdqZQhk




  1. The voters were not remiss in their duty to vote on the day of elections. They followed the instructions. They shaded the ballots in accordance with the instructions. After completion of the shades, they already performed their duty to the country.




  1. The problem is when they fed their ballots into the PCOS machine, it COS refused to accept the ballots. Who was at fault here, the voter or PCOS? More specifically, who is the culprit for the disenfranchisement? Why must the voters suffer for the sins of Comelec and Smartmatic?

http://proxy.storify.com/?url=http%3a%2f%2fpbs.twimg.com%2fmedia%2fbkiphbicuaaowli.jpg

PCOS machine sa Buhatan Integrated National School ginamitan ng stick para bumaba ang balota @gmanews #eleksyon2013 pic.twitter.com/BHyF20LhiP




  1. The Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting (PPCRV) was quick to defend Comelec and pass the blame on teachers.




http://tagadavao.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/abs-cbn_logo.gif

PPCRV blames poor BEI training

for PCOS failure

By Camille Diola

The Philippine Star

via ABS CBN News

POSTED 2013/05/13/7:27 PM



http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/nation/05/13/13/ppcrv-blames-poor-bei-training-pcos-failure

MANILA, Philippines -- An official of the Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting (PPCRV) on Monday partially attributed glitches of several precinct count optical scan (PCOS) machines nationwide to the lack of hands-on training of Board of Election Inspectors (BEI) staff.
PPCRV information technology director William Emmanuel Yu said in an interview with Philstar.com that in some cases, optical scanners malfunctioned not because of inherent product defects but due to the lack of experience of election inspectors handling the machines.
"Maybe [the Commission on Elections] should invest more time to train (BEI members). They were only given a crash course so I don't think they will be able to resolve all possible problems," Yu said.
He added that most inspectors -- mostly public school teachers manning over 78,000 precincts -- have never touched the machine prior to election day on Monday.

"In one session, there would be a thousand BEI members. Hindi naman siguro makaka-hands-on lahat," Yu said.

The technology expert said that in order for BEI to troubleshoot the devices properly, the Comelec should train them in two to three more sessions spread throughout the months before polling day.
"It also happened in 2010. We just copied the [training] template in 2013. It works to a certain degree, but then again we would have some outliers," Yu added.
He cited common problems as paper jams and the wrong feeding of ballots into the machines that cause some of the reported glitches. These, however, could be resolved by BEI locally if trained properly
"I feel a department store cashier is in a better position to man the PCOS machine than the BEI staff because they have a lot of experience. It's a question of practice," the PPCRV official said.


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