Running head: proposal for lan design



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LAN DESIGN


Running head: PROPOSAL FOR LAN DESIGN

Proposal for the Local Area Network Design at the PricewaterhouseCoopers CPA Firm in Atlanta, Georgia

Unit 2 Group Project

James Buchanan

James Cann

James Dean

James McKinley

Jessie James


Carnegie-Mellon University

Enterprise Network Design

ITD640-02

Professor Manny Astte, PhD

September 6, 2003

Abstract

This proposal is for the design of a local area network at the soon to be constructed local office of PricewaterhouseCoopers Certified Public Accountant firm. PricewaterhouseCoopers will be constructing a local office in the Atlanta area. The local office will be in a newly constructed five-story building. PricewaterhouseCoopers is the world’s largest CPA firm, with over 125,000 employees in more than 142 countries. PricewaterhouseCoopers, formed from the 1998 merger of Price Waterhouse and Coopers & Lybrand, has origins dating back to 1849. CEO since January 1, 2002, Samuel A. DiPiazza, Jr. has lead PricewaterhouseCoopers to 2002 net revenues of $13.8 billion. Serving 86% of the Global Fortune 500 companies in Technology, InfoComm, and Entertainment, PricewaterhouseCoopers continues to outgrow it current offices and information technology infrastructure. This proposal will help PricewaterhouseCoopers to expand its current number of offices and service more domestic clients in the southern and eastern states.



Proposal for the Local Area Network Design at the PricewaterhouseCoopers CPA Firm in Atlanta, Georgia



  1. Preliminary Analysis

    1. Client Profile

      1. Successful CPA Firm


      2. Novell NetWare 5.0 Network Operating System (NOS)

      3. 5 separate Departments

      4. 560 Employees Currently

      5. 1 Building, 5 Stories, 1 Department per floor

      6. Requirement of future expansion (scalability) at low cost and minimal effort

      7. Requirement for Local Area Network Connectivity

    2. Assumptions

      1. Client will occupy all 5-Stories of the new Building

      2. There will be approximately 112 Employees per floor

      3. Multi-mode Fibre-Optic Cable throughout the building

      4. Fast Ethernet NICs in every computer

      5. 1000mbit Ethernet on the backbone

      6. Project will be fully funded upon proposal acceptance

    3. Initial Project Guidelines

      1. Gigabit Backbone Switch

      2. 48 Port 10/100 Megabit Switch for every floor (4 per floor x 5 = 20 switches)

      3. Novell Netware 5.0 SFT III (system fault tolerance III) – mirrored servers

      4. Dell OptiPlex GX270 Computers (Pentium 4, 2.8 GHz, 512 MB)

      5. Network printer on every floor

      6. Kentrox Switch for the T-1

      7. Kentrox CSU/DSU for the T-1

      8. Cisco Router for the T-1

      9. Intel Infrastructure devices (i.e. Gigabit switch, 100mbit switches, etc.)

      10. Fibre-Optic cable to every floor

      11. Category 5e (CAT5e) cable to each office


      12. Wireless access point on each floor in a centrally located conference room

    4. Project Unknowns

      1. Will any existing equipment be transferred from existing offices (i.e. legacy computer hardware, etc.).

    5. Project Resources

      1. CMU Consultation Team

        1. Nicole Andrus – Equipment specification, staffing, budgets, and other logistical needs.

        2. Kenneth Barton – Equipment specifications, brand selection, equipment acquisition, and project expense management.

        3. Kevin Blackwell – network engineer, network layout, network design, technical consultant.

        4. Nekisha Charles – technical consultant, project presentation, word processing, project presentation, public affairs, client liaison.

        5. Adam Culberson – Project manager, network consultant, systems engineer.

      2. CMU Consultation Team Professor

  2. Implementation Plan

    1. Our Goals - Our priorities are usability (functionality), security, performance, scalability, availability, and affordability.

      1. Functionality - the network must work with reasonable speed and reliability.

      2. Scalability - the network must be able to grow without any major changes to the overall design.

      3. Adaptability - the network should include no element that would limit use of new technologies as they become available.

      4. Manageability - the network must be able to allow ease of monitoring and managing.

    2. Equipment Selection
      1. Servers - Servers can be of two types: enterprise and workgroup.


        1. Enterprise Servers - Enterprise servers support ALL users by offering services that everyone would need.

        2. Workgroup Servers - Workgroup servers support only a specific group of users, offering services that only a few groups of people would need.

    3. Equipment Placement

      1. Servers

      2. Layer-2 Switches - The two most common layer 2 devices are bridges and LAN switches.



      3. Layer-3 Switches

      4. Routers - Using Layer 3 devices, such as routers, allows for segmentation of the LAN into unique PHYSICAL and LOGICAL networks.

      5. Fibre-Optic Junction Boxes

      6. Network Printers

    4. Logistical Challenges

      1. Intranet versus Internet – When configuring an Intranet (used only by those with access to the LAN) certain logistic challenges exist. Each of these challenges will be discussed in this proposal.

      2. Bandwidth - A bandwidth domain is everything associated with one port on a bridge or switch. In the case of an Ethernet switch, a bandwidth domain is also known as a collision domain.

      3. Broadcast Traffic - Bridges and switches forward broadcast traffic; routers do not. Broadcasts become excessive when the network design is “flat” and does not include separate subnets (segments).

      4. Collision Domains - In an ideal situation, the size of the collision domain is 2 (the source host and the destination host).

      5. Segmentation - the process of splitting a single collision domain into two or more collision domains. Layer 2 bridges and switches are used for this process.

  3. Conclusion

    1. Recommendation

      1. Overall Building Plan


        1. 5-Story Building

        2. 560 Employees

        3. 112 Average Employees per Floor

        4. 10 pair of Multi-mode Fibre-optic cable

        5. 2 pair of multi-mode Fibre-optic cable from the basement to each floor

        6. T-1 Services come in on the 1st Floor and are routed to the basement switch by a 3com Router, after passing through a CSU/DSU

      2. Basement Plan

        1. Main Distribution Frame (MDF) - main distribution frame (MDF) - The central connecting point for both voice and data wiring. Also serves as the main location from which cross connecting and testing are done.

        2. 2 Cisco Pix Firewall

        3. 4 Rack Mounted HP Proliant DL-380 G3 Servers

          1. Server 1

            1. Windows Server 2003 – Web Edition

            2. Member Server

            3. IIS 5.0 World Wide Web (WWW) Server

          2. Server 2

            1. Windows Server 2003 – Enterprise Edition

            2. Domain Controller

            3. DNS

            4. DHCP

            5. File Services

            6. Print Services

            7. Global Catalog Server (GC)

            8. RID Master, PDC Emulator, Schema Master, Domain Naming Master

          3. Server 3

            1. Windows Server 2003 – Enterprise Edition

            2. Domain Controller
            3. Infrastructure Master


          4. Server 4

            1. Windows Server 2003 – Enterprise Edition

            2. Domain Controller

            3. Global Catalog Server

        4. 1 24-port Nortel 10/100/1000 m/bit Switch with a multi-gigabit backplane

        5. Liebert 5KVa Uninterruptible Power Supply

        6. 1 HP ProCurve Switch with a Fibre-Optic Module

      3. 1st Floor Plan

        1. Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF)

        2. 1 HP ProCurve Switch with a Fibre-Optic Module

        3. 3 48-Port HP ProCurve 10/100 m/bit Switches

        4. HP LaserJet 8100DN Networked Workgroup Printer

        5. 120 Dell OptiPlex GX270 Pentium 4, 2.8 gigahertz, 512 MB Computers

          1. Flat Panel LCD Display

          2. 40 GB Hard Drive

          3. 101-Key Keyboard

          4. Optical Scroll Mouse

          5. TrippLite Surge Suppressor

          6. Mouse Pad

      4. 2nd Floor Plan

        1. 1 HP ProCurve Switch with a Fibre-Optic Module

        2. 3 48-Port HP ProCurve 10/100 m/bit Switches

        3. HP LaserJet 8100DN Networked Workgroup Printer
        4. 120 Dell OptiPlex GX270 Pentium 4, 2.8 gigahertz, 512 MB Computers


          1. Flat Panel LCD Display

          2. 40 GB Hard Drive

          3. 101-Key Keyboard

          4. Optical Scroll Mouse

          5. TrippLite Surge Suppressor

          6. Mouse Pad

      5. 3rd Floor Plan

        1. 1 HP ProCurve Switch with a Fibre-Optic Module

        2. 3 48-Port HP ProCurve 10/100 m/bit Switches

        3. HP LaserJet 8100DN Networked Workgroup Printer

        4. 120 Dell OptiPlex GX270 Pentium 4, 2.8 gigahertz, 512 MB Computers

          1. Flat Panel LCD Display

          2. 40 GB Hard Drive

          3. 101-Key Keyboard

          4. Optical Scroll Mouse

          5. TrippLite Surge Suppressor

          6. Mouse Pad

      6. 4th Floor Plan

        1. 1 HP ProCurve Switch with a Fibre-Optic Module

        2. 3 48-Port HP ProCurve 10/100 m/bit Switches

        3. HP LaserJet 8100DN Networked Workgroup Printer

        4. 120 Dell OptiPlex GX270 Pentium 4, 2.8 gigahertz, 512 MB Computers

          1. Flat Panel LCD Display

          2. 40 GB Hard Drive

          3. 101-Key Keyboard

          4. Optical Scroll Mouse

          5. TrippLite Surge Suppressor

          6. Mouse Pad

      7. 5th Floor Plan

        1. 1 HP ProCurve Switch with a Fibre-Optic Module

        2. 3 48-Port HP ProCurve 10/100 mbit Switches

        3. HP LaserJet 8100DN Networked Workgroup Printer
        4. 120 Dell OptiPlex GX270 Pentium 4, 2.8 gigahertz, 512 MB Computers


          1. Flat Panel LCD Display

          2. 40 GB Hard Drive

          3. 101-Key Keyboard

          4. Optical Scroll Mouse

          5. TrippLite Surge Suppressor

          6. Mouse Pad

    2. Project Cost

      1. Equipment

        1. $1,200.00

      2. Labor

        1. $40,000.00

    3. Project Timeline

      1. Duration

        1. 2 Months

        2. 320 x 5 staff = 1600 staff hours of work

References

Cisco. (2003). Welcome to Cisco Systems. Retrieved on September 3, 2003 from http://www.cisco.com .

Convery, S., Trudel, B. (April 24, 2003). SAFE: A Security Blueprint for Enterprise Networks. Cisco Systems, Inc. Retrieved on August 31, 2003 from http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/cc/so/cuso/epso/sqfr/safe_wp.htm

Dean, T. (2002). Network+ Guide to Networks. 2nd Ed. Course Technology, Boston MA. Pp. 182-192, 203-208, 275-282

Dell. (2003). As Easy as Dell. Retrieved on September 5, 2003 from http://www.dell.com/us/en/gen/default.htm .

Kentrox. (2003). Network Access Solutions for Enterprises and Service Providers. Retrieved on September 6, 2003 from http://www.kentrox.com .

Liebert. (2003). Keeping Business in Business. Retrieved on September 6, 2003 from http://www.liebert.com .

Novell (2003). Novell, Inc. Retrieved on September 4, 2003 from http://www.novell.com .

PricewaterhouseCoopers (2002). 2002 Global Annual Review. Retrieved on September 5, 2003 from http://www.pwc.com/extweb/onlineforms.nsf/(aid)/17118992766954A685256C70005EFF08/$file/PwC_Annual_Review_2002.pdf .

PricewaterhouseCoopers (2003). About Us. Retrieved on September 1, 2003 from http://www.pwcglobal.com/gx/eng/about/main/index.html .

Tripplite. (2003). Your Single Source Solution. Retrieved on September 6, 2003 from http://www.tripplite.com .

See the illustrations below for a function diagram of the basic network layout

Illustration 1.


Illustration 2.


Illustration 3.


Illustration 4.


Illustration 5.


Illustration 6.


Illustration 7.


Illustration 8.





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