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English Standards of Learning

ENHANCED SCOPE and SEQUENCE

FOURTH GRADE

SAMPLE LESSON PLANS

Introduction

The sample lesson plans included in this document are expansions of the Virginia Department of Education’s Enhanced Scope and Sequence oral language lesson plans. They include TTAC suggestions for differentiation.


This resource is intended to help teachers align their classroom instruction with the content found in English Standards of Learning. The sample lessons are based on sound research and provide a variety of ways to actively involved children in their learning. The lessons serve to supplement the instructional suggestions in the Houghton Mifflin Teacher’s Edition.
While the sample lessons are exemplary, they by no means represent the scope of instruction that MCPS teachers are implementing in their classrooms. Teachers are invited to follow the lesson format in this document and write additional lessons to include in next year’s Curriculum Guide update.
To submit an additional lesson, copy a page from this word document to your hard drive. Use the format to guide you as you type over it the appropriate information for your lesson. Submit the lesson by sending it as an attachment to bwojo@mail.mcps.org. Please submit your lessons throughout the year so that the Office of Curriculum can compile them for review by groups of teachers next summer.

READING Lesson Plan  Gathering Word Meanings



Organizing Topic Word Analysis and Spelling

Related Standard(s) of Learning 4.3

Objective(s)


  • The student will build and apply knowledge of context clues in order to determine the meaning of words.


Prerequisite Understandings/Knowledge/Skills
  • Students are expected to know the parts of speech: noun, verb, adjective, and adverb.


  • Students are expected to know how to use a dictionary and glossary.

  • Students are expected to know synonyms and antonyms.



Materials needed


  • Content text

  • Text sentences with target vocabulary word and surrounding context clues written on a transparency

  • Transparency marker

  • Dictionaries



Lesson procedure

1. Put on the board a target vocabulary word taken from a text the students will be reading, pronounce that word, and ask the students if they think it is a noun, verb, adjective, or adverb.

2. Have students speculate regarding the part of speech and support their ideas by identifying features that typically indicate a particular part of speech, e.g., plural endings of nouns, suffix endings of adjectives and adverbs, inflected endings of verbs.

3. Show the students the sentence from the text in which the word is used, read the sentence to the class, and explain that sometimes information surrounding a word can help them figure out what the word means.

4. Examine with the students the sentence structure to confirm if the word is used as a noun, verb, adjective, or adverb. Examine the surrounding context to determine what the word means. As part of this discussion, underline and/or circle key words and phrases that help the students to figure out the meaning of the word.

5. As part of the discussion, lead students to identify the relationship between the target vocabulary word and the underlined and/or circled words and phrases, e.g., synonym/antonym, definition, example, clarifying details.

6. Students should verify the meaning of the word in a dictionary or glossary, making certain they identify the dictionary definition that fits the part of speech and the given context.

7. The process may be repeated with a second vocabulary word.

8. Students should read the text selection to confirm their understanding of the word and see if they can add anything new to their understanding.

Specific options for differentiating this lesson:
Technology:


  • Make available the text sentences in a word processing document. Have students use the highlighting tool to highlight the key words and phrases to help them determine the meaning of the word.

  • Have students use a hand-held electronic speller to assist them with word meaning.

  • Provide each student with a copy of the transparency to use during the lesson.

  • Have students use different-colored highlighters for each part of speech and/or the key words and phrases.


Multisensory

  • Have students use different-colored highlighters to highlight the key words and phrases and parts of speech on their copy of the transparency.

  • Have students use different picture cards (created from a picture communication software program) that represent the different parts of speech to reinforce their meanings in text.

  • Have students use a tape recorder to repeat the definitions as a review to reinforce the vocabulary terms and the parts of speech.

  • Have students play Charades with words; the audience determines the word and the part of speech of that word.


Community Connections

  • Invite an author or a newspaper reporter to visit the class to discuss how he/she uses words or word phrases to capture their attention of their audience.


Small Group Learning

  • Assign students to work in pairs when highlighting key words and phrases on their copy of the transparency.

  • Have students work in pairs to locate words in the dictionary or glossary.

  • Have students work in small groups to complete the word processing document listed in the Technology section.


Vocabulary
  • Students should be familiar with the following words: noun, verb, adverb, adjective, dictionary, glossary, synonym, antonym, definition, plural, inflected, suffix, context, clues, clarifying, phrase.


  • Have students play a matching game with word cards, matching the word to the part of speech. Some students may benefit from color-coded cards that match the color-coded parts of speech.

  • Have students create individual dictionaries with each page of the dictionary divided into four equal sections: a word section, an illustration section, a definition section, and a part of speech section.

  • Have students create picture vocabulary cards that have the word on one side and a visual representation of the word on the other side.

  • Have students refer to their class word wall to determine which words are nouns, verbs, adverbs, and adjectives.

  • Create a matching game where the students match the definition to the pictorial representation of the word or the word to the definition.

  • Have students complete vocabulary crossword puzzles and other activities to review the vocabulary.


Student Organization of Content

  • Have students create a section in their notebooks for each of the four parts of speech. The students may record different key words and phrases that relate to words that represent that part of speech.

  • Provide access to a graphic organizer or a graphic organizer software program to help students organize the words into the different parts of speech categories.

  • Have students play Jeopardy with the parts of speech as the different categories.



READING Lesson Plan  One Word, Many Meanings



Organizing Topic Word Analysis and Spelling

Related Standard(s) of Learning 4.3

Objective(s)

  • The student will apply prior knowledge of the multiple meanings of words in order to explain how a word is used in a specific selection.




Prerequisite Understandings/Knowledge/Skills


  • Students are expected to understand the concept of multiple meanings of words.

  • Students are expected to know the parts of speech: noun, verb, adjective, and adverb.



Materials needed


  • Text with words that have multiple meanings

  • Teacher-selected, target words with multiple meanings from texts



Lesson procedure

1. Put a target word with multiple meanings on the board or chart paper and pronounce it, e.g., wind.

2. Have students brainstorm all the ways they can think of using the word and its various forms, e.g., windbreaker, wind chime, wind speed, windy day. Record the brainstormed words.

3. Lead students to discuss how the target word is used in each example: does it name (noun), describe a name (adjective), show action (verb), or describe action (adverb)? Any additional interesting language feature is also discussed, e.g., use as part of compound word as in windbreaker.

4. If there is a second pronunciation for the word, pronounce it. Students should continue brainstorming while you record new uses of the word, e.g., wind-up toy, wind along a path, winding road.

5. Lead students to discuss how the target word is used in each example: does it name (noun), describe a name (adjective), show action (verb), or describe action (adverb)? Any additional interesting language feature is also discussed, e.g., use in hyphenated word: wind-up.

6. Label each brainstormed word, using letters in alphabetical order, i.e.: a) windbreaker, b) wind chime, c) wind speed, d) windy day, e) wind-up toy, f) wind along a path, g) winding road.

7. Based on what students know about the passage they are to read, they should predict how the word will be used and justify their predictions.

8. The process may be repeated for a second word with multiple meanings within the passage to be read.

9. Students should read silently the selection to find out how the word(s) are used. When they come to one of the words they have discussed, they should consult the group-brainstormed list and identify which meaning is used. They may record the letter of the appropriate use.

10. As part of discussion after reading the selection, have students clarify the meaning of the target word(s). Students should explain how they used the information in the passage to determine the appropriate use of the word in the context of the passage.

Specific options for differentiating this lesson:
Technology


  • Use a graphic organizer program to record student responses to activity # 2 and 4. The graphic organizer may be projected for all students to view.

  • Place the text used in the lesson in a word processing document for the students to reference. The text may be read to students by a screen reader. Also, the students may use the highlighter tool to highlight the targeted words.

  • Have students listen to a recording of the text used in #9.

  • Have students use highlighters or colored sticky notes to highlight the targeted words in text.

  • Create a color-coded class chart describing the four parts of speech, with examples listed for each part of speech.


Multisensory

  • Have students use different-colored highlighters to highlight the targeted words.

  • Have students use word cards (with hook and loop tape on the back of each one) to match to the four parts of speech on individual charts separated into the four parts of speech (with hook and loop tape in each category).

  • Provide students with pictorial representations for the different brainstormed words, such as the words listed in activity #6.

  • Record the different pronunciations of a word and the words in a sentence for the students.

  • Have students play Charades with the brainstormed words.


Community Connections

  • Invite an author or a newspaper reporter visit the class to discuss how he/she uses words or word phrases to capture the attention of the audience.


Small Group Learning

  • Have students work in pairs to read the text.
  • Have students work in small groups to create picture cards for each brainstormed word.


  • Have students work in small groups to complete the highlighting activities listed under Technology.


Vocabulary

  • Students should be familiar with the following words: noun, verb, adverb, adjective, multiple, meaning, pronounce, hyphenated.

  • Play a matching game with word cards. The students match the word to the part of speech. Some students may benefit from color-coded cards that match the color-coded parts of speech.

  • Have students create individual dictionaries with each page of the dictionary divided into four equal sections: a word section, an illustration section, a definition section, and a part of speech section.

  • Have students create picture vocabulary cards that have the word on one side and a visual representation of the word on the other side.

  • Tell students to refer to the class word wall to determine which words are nouns, verbs, adverbs, and adjectives.

  • Create a matching game where the students match the definition to the pictorial representation of the word or the word to the definition.

  • Have students complete vocabulary crossword puzzles and other activities to review the vocabulary.


Student Organization of Content

  • Have students create a section in their notebooks for each of the four parts of speech. The students may record different key words and phrases that relate to words that represent that part of speech.

  • Have students use a graphic organizer or a graphic organizer software program to list several meanings of words. The graphic organizer can be placed in their notebooks.

  • Have students play Jeopardy with the parts of speech as the different categories.

READING Lesson Plan  Sensory Words


Organizing Topic Vocabulary and Comprehension of Fiction

Related Standard(s) of Learning 4.4

Objective(s)


  • The student will identify sensory words used by a poet and describe the impact of the words on the reader.


Prerequisite Understandings/Knowledge/Skills

  • Students are expected to understand the term sensory.

  • Students are expected to describe different feelings.

  • Students are expected to have grade-level reading comprehension.

  • Students are expected to understand descriptive words.



Materials needed


  • Transparency and handouts of a poem that uses sensory words

  • Overhead projector

  • Transparency marker

  • Transparency of three-column organizer: column one labeled Pictures
    , column two labeled Sense, and column three labeled Why We Like It



Lesson procedure

1. Explain that poets choose their words carefully to create an impact on their readers and that the words they choose help the reader to better imagine places, characters, and events.

2. Read the poem aloud while students close their eyes, listen, and imagine the pictures the poet creates.

3. Ask students to talk about the images they imagined and the feelings they experienced.

4. Give each student a copy of the poem and place a transparency of the poem on the overhead. Read the poem a second time with students following along.

5. As you read, students should underline words or phrases that help them imagine a place, character, or event.

6. Lead the students to revisit the poem and share with the class the words or phrases that they underlined.

7. As a student identifies a word or phrase, record it in the first column of the three-column organizer: Pictures.

8. Discuss with the class the word or phrase and identify if it describes a sight, sound, smell, or taste. Record their response in the second column: Sense.

9. Have the students discuss why they liked the word or phrase. They may consider questions such as: How does it create a mood or feeling in the poem? Is there a comparison being made to something? What picture or feeling does the comparison create?

10. Record student thinking in the third column: Why We Like It.


  1. After the class has identified all of the words or phrases that students have underlined and you have recorded the senses and reasons students like each word or phrase, discuss the reasons poets choose to use so many words that appeal to the reader’s senses.


Specific options for differentiating this lesson
Technology

  • Provide students with the poem in a word processing program. The students may use the highlighting tool to highlight the words or phrases for activity #5.

  • Use a graphic organizer software program for the three-column organizer described in the lesson. The graphic organizer may be projected for the students to view.

  • Have students use picture cards that represent the different feelings. (A picture communication software program may be used to create these cards.) Students may use the picture cards to describe their feelings after listening to the poem.

  • Have students use a communication device to indicate their feelings, if they are unable to verbalize the feeling.


Multisensory

  • Have students write the words describing place, character, and event from the poem on colored note cards. The colored note cards correspond to the color-labeled boxes for place, character, and event. The students place the note cards in the corresponding boxes.

  • Have students compare the colored note cards to determine if they had the same words in the same box. (Aligns with activity #6.)


Community Connections

  • Invite a local poet to visit the students to discuss how he/she selects words to describe a place, character, and event.
  • Have students visit Dr. Seuss’ website to see how he uses sensory words to help others imagine a place, character, or event.



Small Group Learning

  • Place students in groups of three. One student looks for words to describe a place, another student looks for words to describe a character, and the third student looks for words to describe an event.

  • Place students in pairs to reread the poem and share with each other why they liked it.


Vocabulary

  • Students should be familiar with the following words: sensory, sight, sound, smell, taste, sense, imagine.

  • Have students create individual dictionaries with each page of the dictionary divided into four equal sections: a word section, an illustration section, a definition section, and a real-world use of the word section.

  • Have students create picture vocabulary cards that have the word on one side and a visual representation of the word on the other side.

  • Create a class word wall for vocabulary related to this content area.

  • Have students create their own individual word walls in a manila folder or in a rolodex.

  • Create a matching game where the students match the definition to the pictorial representation of the word or the word to the definition.

  • Have students complete vocabulary crossword puzzles and other activities to review the vocabulary.


Student Organization of Content

  • Have students place their word cards in a folder or rolodex for review.

  • Have students complete the three-column graphic organizer in small groups and place it in their folder or notebook.

  • Have students place a copy of the poem, with underlined key words and phrases for the different senses, in their notebook or folder.


READING Lesson Plan  The Predictive Power of Vocabulary


Organizing Topic Vocabulary and Comprehension of Fiction

Related Standard(s) of Learning 4.4

Objective(s)


  • The student will use key vocabulary to anticipate the setting, character(s), and plot of a story.


Prerequisite Understandings/Knowledge/Skills

  • Students are expected to understand the elements of a story: setting, characters, problem, and solution.

  • Students are expected to comprehend grade-level material.

  • Students are expected to understand the concept of summarization.

  • Students are expected to locate information within a given story or text.

  • Students are expected to know how to make a prediction.



Materials needed


  • Copies of the selected story for each student

  • Transparency and handouts of a familiar story structure organizer that has space for students to record information about setting, characters, problem, and solution and, at the bottom of the page, a space to record a summary statement (For students who need more structure creating a summary statement, the teacher may use a summary frame like the one below.)

    The story mainly takes place _____________________________________. ______________ is a character who ________________________. A problem occurs when __________________________. After that, ____________________________. Next, ___________________________. The problem is resolved when _____________________________.




  • Overhead projector

  • Transparency marker

  • Teacher-made list of key words and phrases from the selected story (may include character and place names)



Lesson procedure


1. Place the transparency on the projector and conduct a review of the concepts: setting, character, problem, and solution. Encourage students to draw examples from a story they have recently read. Use prompts as you lead a discussion of each element of the story, e.g., “What words would you use to describe the setting?” “What made the setting? “How did the author show us the setting?”

2. As students discuss each story element, record key vocabulary in the appropriate portion of the organizer.

3. After all elements are discussed, lead students to compose a story summary statement, and record it in the appropriate portion of the organizer.

4. Explain to students that they can use their knowledge of story structure (setting, characters, problem, and solution) and their knowledge of key vocabulary in a story to predict what the story will be about.

5. Give each student a blank copy of the story structure organizer.

6. Write one of the vocabulary words on the board, pronounce it for the students, and either ask a student to clarify its meaning or tell the students what it means.

7. Have students talk in pairs to predict if the word is part of the description of the setting, has something to do with the character, or might relate in some way to the problem or solution in the story. Pairs should record their predictions on their organizers. Lead the students in discussion of their predictions and the reasons for them. Accept all responses.

8. Repeat this process for about 10 words or phrases. (Once students understand the process, you may want to have pairs of students make decisions about 2 or more words at a time.)

9. Have students review the summary statement they created at the beginning of the lesson, and ask pairs of students to construct an oral summary statement to be shared with the class.

10. After volunteer pairs share their statements, direct students to individually record a summary statement on their organizers.

11. Have students read the story individually, or have partners read it to one another. Students should read or listen with the purpose of confirming or modifying their earlier predictions.

12. After students have read or heard the story, have them return to their organizers and discuss what changes need to be made. Have them mark a word out of one part of the organizer and record it to accurately reflect the story, using a different color pencil.


  1. Have the students use their revised organizers to compose a summary statement of the story.


Specific options for differentiating this lesson:
Technology

  • Have students use a graphic organizer software program to record the elements of the story.

  • Have students use colored sticky notes to locate key words in the text and place them on the hard copy of the story structure organizer.

  • Assign students to work in pairs and tape record their summary statement for the story.

  • Have students use a text-to-speech program to read the story.

  • Have students use a copy of the story structure organizer created as a Word document. Have them highlight key words using the highlighting tool to help them recognize or help them find the setting, characters, problem, and solution.

  • Give students a list of the vocabulary words and their definitions and/or record the vocabulary words and definitions on a class chart for reference.


Multisensory

  • Provide students with a graphic organizer on a chart (pictures representing each element are placed next to each heading as a reference) and have them use colored sticky notes to place identifying words from the story in each category on the chart.

  • Have students use a tape recorder to record their summary.

  • Have students act out the key vocabulary words and/or the different elements of the story.

  • Have students different-colored pencils for the different elements (one color per element) of the story when recording on the story structure organizer.


Community Connections

  • Invite a local children’s author or librarian to visit the class to discuss the elements of a story and their effect on the reader.

Small Group Learning


  • Have students the selection with a partner and discuss the elements of the story.

  • Assign students to work in pairs to make predictions for the story.

  • Assign students to work in small groups to complete the story summary.

  • Have students work in small groups to complete a class chart of the story structure organizer.


Vocabulary

  • Students should be familiar with the following vocabulary: setting, characters, plot, problem, solution, summary, predict, description, clarify.

  • Have students create individual dictionaries with each page of the dictionary divided into four equal sections: a word section, an illustration section, a definition section, and a real-world use of the word section.

  • Have students create picture vocabulary cards that have the word on one side and a visual representation of the word on the other side.

  • Create a class word wall for vocabulary related to this content area.

  • Have students create their own individual word walls in a manila folder or in a rolodex.

  • Create a matching game where the students match the definition to the pictorial representation of the word or the word to the definition.

  • Have students complete vocabulary crossword puzzles and other activities to review the vocabulary.


Student Organization of Content

  • Have students place their word cards in a folder or rolodex for review.

  • Have students complete the story structure organizer and place it in their notebooks.

  • Have students place an example of the summary statement graphic organizer in their notebooks.



READING Lesson Plan  Reading with Questions


Organizing Topic Vocabulary and Comprehension of Nonfiction


Related Standard(s) of Learning 4.5

Objective(s)


  • The student will generate questions to guide reading, gather information to answer questions, and organize information that has been gathered.


Prerequisite Understandings/Knowledge/Skills

  • Students are expected to comprehend grade-level nonfiction text.

  • Students are expected to recall information from nonfiction text.

  • Students are expected to understand the concept of brainstorming.



Materials needed


  • A nonfiction text on a key social studies or science topic

  • Chart paper or bulletin board paper

  • Markers



Lesson procedure

1. At the center top of a piece of chart paper, identify the topic to be considered. Below and at the left margin, write What We Know.

2. Arrange students in small groups, with one group member replicating the teacher-made chart on a sheet of notebook paper.

3. Have the small groups brainstorm what they know or think they know about the topic, one student listing the information for the group.

4. Have groups take turns sharing an idea from their brainstormed list as you record each on the chart paper. Continue until all groups have shared their brainstormed ideas.

5. Ask students to listen for items that are similar as you read the class-generated list. Tell them that they are going to organize the information by grouping related ideas together.

6. Have students identify the items that should be grouped together. As students identify related ideas, code which items are similar by placing a specific color mark or symbol by related ideas.

7. Once all information is coded as belonging to a group of related ideas, ask students how they should label each group of ideas. Make a legend that indicates the label for each group of information as coded by color or symbol.

8. By the next class meeting, create a three-column chart, the first column labeled What We Know. The other columns do not yet have headings. The What We Know column contains the ideas from the previous lesson, related ideas listed under the student-created labels that identify the category of information.

9. Indicate that the class is going to develop a KWL chart. Explain that this kind of chart shows what students Know, what they Want to learn, and what new information they do Learn.

10. Point out that they have already created the Know column and that they are now going to generate some questions about what they want to learn. Write Want to Learn at the top of the second column and copy the category labels in the column, directly across from where they are written in the What We Know column.

11. Model reading the category labels, reviewing what students have already listed within each category and posing a question that springs from the category. Questions are phrased as wonderings, such as: I wonder what makes…? I wonder why…? I wonder if…? I wonder who…? I wonder where…? I wonder how…? (The “I wonder” stem does not have to be recorded for each question; however, it is a good way to help students get a running start to phrase a question.)

12. Ask students to generate their own questions and write each under the appropriate category label in the Want to Learn column. Keep the students focused on the categories and the relationships of their questions to the information that they already generated. (Feel free to add your own questions, especially if something important has not been mentioned by students.)

13. Have students read the text silently, in segments if it is a longer selection like a textbook chapter or a content trade book.

14. After each segment of reading, students, either individually or in pairs, should review what they have read that answers or might help them answer their questions.

15. Conduct a large-group discussion to have students identify the information that answers or might help to answer the generated questions. Record information to answer a question directly across from the question in the third column, labeled Information We Learned.

16. Continue reading, discussing, and recording information until the students have finished reading the text.

17. In pairs, students should review the questions and determine if each question has been sufficiently answered. Students may discover that they have posed questions that are not answered after reading the selection. Discuss ways to find information about those questions that were not answered.

18. If you wish, guide students to pursue additional resources to answer the remaining questions.

Specific options for differentiating this lesson:
Technology


  • Use a graphic organizer software program to record the elements of the chart. The graphic organizer may be projected for all students to view.

  • Have students use a recording of the text to assist them with reading the material.

  • Have students use a word processor to duplicate the KWL chart and to enter information onto the chart.

  • TWrite the items of the same group on same colored note cards (for activity #8).

  • Include picture clues at the top of each column of the KWL chart.

  • Have students use colored sticky notes to highlight answers to the generated questions (in activity #12) as they read the text.


Multisensory

  • Provide students with their own copy of the KWL graphic organizer and have them color-code their responses on the chart.

  • Have students use a tape recorder to record their “I Wonder” statements.

  • Give students an enlarged copy of the KWL chart and sentence strips with different questions/statements on them. The students place the questions/statements in the appropriate section of the chart.


Community Connections

  • Invite a local newspaper reporter or television reporter to visit the class to discuss how the KWL chart is applicable to investigating and writing/reporting news stories.


Small Group Learning

  • Have students read the selection with a partner and discuss the information in the story that applies to the KWL chart.

  • Assign students to work in small groups to complete the KWL chart activity described in the Multisensory section.
  • Have students work in small groups to review the questions and find additional information in activity #17 and activity #18.



Vocabulary

  • Students should be familiar with the following vocabulary: legend, symbol, brainstorm, category.

  • Have students create picture vocabulary cards that have the word on one side and a visual representation of the word on the other side.

  • Create a class word wall for vocabulary related to this content area.

  • Have students create their own individual word walls in a manila folder or in a rolodex.

  • Create a matching game where the students match the definition to the pictorial representation of the word or the word to the definition. The game may include vocabulary from previous lessons.

  • Have students complete vocabulary crossword puzzles and other activities to review the vocabulary. The puzzles may include vocabulary from previous lessons.


Student Organization of Content

  • Have students place their word cards in a folder or rolodex for review.

  • Have students complete the KWL chart and place it in their notebooks.

  • Have students include examples of “I Wonder” statements in their notebook for reference.




READING Lesson Plan  The About Point Note Taking Guide



Organizing Topic Vocabulary and Comprehension of Nonfiction

Related Standard(s) of Learning 4.6

Objective(s)


  • The student will take notes on key ideas in informational texts and summarize important concepts.


Prerequisite Understandings/Knowledge/Skills

  • Students are expected to comprehend grad-level nonfiction text.

  • Students are expected to recall information from the nonfiction text.
  • Students are expected to locate information from the text.


  • Students are expected to draw conclusions.



Materials needed


  • A multiple-paragraph informational text that students are expected to comprehend

  • Student copies of the About Point Note Taking Guide, as shown below

  • Overhead projector

  • Transparency copy of the About Point Note Taking Guide

  • Transparency marker

About

Point and Details

noun or phrase

point and details

noun or phrase

point and details



Lesson procedure

1. Explain that you are going to teach the students a strategy that will help them understand the main ideas in their reading.

2. Give each student a copy of the About Point Note Taking Guide, and place the transparency on the overhead projector.

3. Tell the students to read silently the first paragraph (or section) of the text for the purpose of understanding what the passage is about (main idea).

4. After the students have read the first paragraph, discuss with them what it was about. Guide the students to identify a word (noun) or phrase that tells what the paragraph was about: the idea, topic, or concept. Model recording the noun or phrase in the About column.

5. Discuss with the students the point the author is making about the idea, topic, or concept they have identified, and record the response on the transparency in the Point and Details column.

6. Have students record the information on their own guides.

7. Under the point statement, write Details. Ask students to identify the details that led them to draw the conclusion stated in the Point column. List the details on the transparency, and have the students list them on their guides.

8. Direct the students to read the next paragraph silently to determine the main idea.

9. In pairs, students should work to identify About, Point, and Details. Have them record their work on their guides as you circulate to make certain that students understand the task.

10. Conduct a large-group share. Pairs of students share what they wrote for About, Point, and Details. Lead students to focus on examples that best represent About and Point for the paragraph. Record a model response that combines what students have said on the transparency guide.

11. Have students read the next paragraph silently, repeating until they have completed reading and taking notes on the assignment.

12. Model how About, Point, and Details notes for a paragraph can be combined to create a summary statement.


  1. Have students take turns in pairs creating an oral summary for each paragraph. Monitor the pairs as the listener provides feedback to the summarizer.


Specific options for differentiating this lesson:
Technology

  • Use a graphic organizer software program to record the categories of an About Point Notetaking Guide. The graphic organizer may be projected for all students to view.

  • Provide students with a recording of the text to assist them with reading the material.

  • Have students use a word processor to duplicate the About Point Notetaking Guide and to enter information onto the guide.

  • Write the main idea, point, and details on different-colored note cards for a class size chart.

  • Complete the transparency using different-colored markers, one color for each category.

  • Have students use colored sticky notes as they read to highlight information for the categories.


Multisensory

  • Provide students with their own copy of the About Point Notetaking Guide and have them color-code their responses on the chart.

  • Have students use a laminated About Point Notetaking Guide with hook and loop tape in each category. Students match different color-coded cards (with hook and loop tape on them) to the corresponding category.

  • Provide a tape recorder for students to record their oral summaries.

  • Have students use different highlighters to highlight a copy of the text as they locate information for each category.

  • Have students read the text with a partner or small group.


Community Connections
  • Arrange for a visit to a local newspaper or local television station to discuss how the About Point Notetaking Guide is applicable to investigating and writing/reporting news stories.



Small Group Learning

  • Have students read the selection with a partner and discuss the information in the story that applies to the About Point Notetaking Guide.

  • Assign students to work in small groups to enter information into the About Point Notetaking Guide that was created in the word processing program.

  • Have students work in small groups to complete the summary.


Vocabulary

  • Students should be familiar with the following vocabulary: point, details, main idea, noun, topic, concept, phrase, guide, summary.

  • Have students create picture vocabulary cards that have the word on one side and a visual representation of the word on the other side.

  • Create a class word wall for vocabulary related to this content area.

  • Have students create their own individual word walls in a manila folder or in a rolodex.

  • Create a matching game where the students match the definition to the pictorial representation of the word or the word to the definition. The game may include vocabulary from previous lessons.

  • Have students complete vocabulary crossword puzzles and other activities to review the vocabulary. The puzzles may include vocabulary from previous lessons.


Student Organization of Content

  • Have students place their word cards in a folder or rolodex for review.

  • Have students complete the About Point Notetaking Guide and place it in their notebooks.

  • Have students use an enhanced content organizer to identify the main idea and supporting details.






Department of Education 2004






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