School of Arts, Culture & Environment oll for-credit courses



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School of Arts, Culture & Environment

OLL for-credit courses

UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

Approval of a New or Revised Course

All new courses should be created online via WISARD and approved online. This sheet should only be used for Continuing Education courses (or where the online process has failed).

† = Mandatory for Approval



Course Code - n/a

† Course Name

Discovering Spanish Art



† ‘Owning’ School : ACE/ OLL

College: CHSS

School Acronym for Course: n/a

Collaborating Body e.g. School or other Institution:

Additional Information on Collaboration:

† Course Level

U

† If PG, Modular

Master’s?



N/A

† If UG, Honours?


N/A

† Visiting Students

Only?


N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Course(s) being replaced

† Credit Points

10

† Credit Scheme

SCQF

† Credit Level

7

† Contact Teaching: 22 hours

Other Required Attendance: None

† Session course operational with effect from 2010-11

Scheduled Class Hours 22 hours over 11 weeks; OLL to schedule

Any costs which have to be met by students e.g. materials : None

Code(s) and Name(s) of any Prerequisite Courses N/A

Other Prerequisite Requirements N/A

Programme(s), Method(s) of Study and Year(s) of Study for which Course is Mandatory, or Optional but to be Seeded N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Prohibited Combinations N/A

Other Prohibited Combination Requirements N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Co-requisite Courses : N/A


Other Co-requisite Requirements N/A

† Short description of course

This course provides a survey of the arts in Spain from the 16th century to the early 20th century. There is currently no provision at OLL for the study of Spanish art.


What do Velázquez, Goya, Fortuny, Gaudí, Picasso and other Spanish artists have in common? This course offers a stimulating survey of the arts in Spain, starting with El Greco in Catholic Toledo and ending with the Spanish avant-garde in early 20th-century Barcelona. In discussing works of art and architecture within their historical, political and artistic contexts, we will discover the complex development of the arts in Spain, and challenge certain seductive theories of ‘Spanishness’ reducing the arts in Spain to a single ‘Spanish’ tradition.


† Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students should:



  • understand the development of the arts in Spain in the greater context of Western art history

  • understand the concept of ‘Spanishness’ in relation to the arts in Spain

  • have in-depth knowledge of the most prominent works by key artists/architects, such as El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Gaudi and Picasso

  • be able to consider Spanish art within the wider historical context

  • be able to analyze and interpret a work of art, using the appropriate art historical vocabulary

  • be able to engage critically with the scholarship on the subject


Components of Assessment

Assessment 1: Unseen Assessment (Slide Quiz) Weighting 25%

Assessment 2: Essay of 2000 words, Weighting: 75%

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks



URL for supporting approval documentation

N/A

† Course Organiser Loura Brooks, MA Hons, Course Organiser, Open Studies

† Course Secretary N/A

Course URL (where not WebCT)




UG Courses Only: Year(s) in which course normally taken (e.g. 1, 1+2)

Summative Exams

Diet

(1st or 2nd)



Diet Month

Code

(e.g. 1, 2)



Paper Name (e.g. Paper 1)

Duration (hrs/mins)

Comments (e.g. Other courses with exam common content)

N/A

















N/A



















† Month Assessment Result Due (1st Diet)

February

† Month Assessment Result Due (2nd Diet)

May for courses starting in January, August for courses starting in April. Marks are confirmed by the meeting of the Final Assessment Board in August.



Chairman of Board of Examiners

† Default Course Mode of Study Class and Assignment

Course Organiser Comments (Internal Use Only)

Approved by/On behalf of

Date

Authorised signature

Name

Course Organiser

13.1.10


Loura Brooks


Convener, School BoS










Convener, College SC










Convener, SUGSC/SPGSC










Processed by Registry









1. Course title: Discovering Spanish Art


2. Tutor name(s): Dr. Claudia Heide
3. Tutor qualifications: MA, MSc, PhD History of Art
4. Rationale / Description
This course provides a survey of the arts in Spain from the 16th century to the early 20th century. There is currently no provision at OLL for the study of Spanish art.

What do Velázquez, Goya, Fortuny, Gaudí, Picasso and other Spanish artists have in common? This course offers a stimulating survey of the arts in Spain, starting with El Greco in Catholic Toledo and ending with the Spanish avant-garde in early 20th-century Barcelona. In discussing works of art and architecture within their historical, political and artistic contexts, we will discover the complex development of the arts in Spain, and challenge certain seductive theories of ‘Spanishness’ reducing the arts in Spain to a single ‘Spanish’ tradition.

5. Course aims & objectives

Aims:


  • To introduce students to a survey of canonical works produced in Spain from the 15th to 19th centuries

Objectives:



  • To explore the notion of works of art from this period and how they constitute a ‘Golden Age’

  • To place works of art produced in Spain within their larger Western European art- historical context

  • To familiarise students with the major artists and art works of the period

6. Intended learning outcomes


By the end of this course, students should:


  • understand the development of the arts in Spain in the greater context of Western art history

  • understand the concept of ‘Spanishness’ in relation to the arts in Spain

  • have in-depth knowledge of the most prominent works by key artists/architects, such as El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Gaudi and Picasso

  • be able to consider Spanish art within the wider historical context

  • be able to analyse and interpret a work of art, using the appropriate art historical vocabulary

  • be able to engage critically with the scholarship on the subject

7. Transferable skills




  • analytical skills (visual and textual analysis)

  • critical thinking

  • comparative skills

  • participation in discussion

8. Contents


Week 1: Introduction
Week 2: Visit to the National Gallery of Scotland: from El Greco to Velázquez
Week 3: Velázquez at the court of Madrid
Week 4: Religious Cycles: Zurbarán and Murillo

Week 5: Art and Architecture in Bourbon Spain

Week 6: Goya in the Twilight of the Enlightenment
Week 7: The Nineteenth Century from Goya to Impressionism
Week 8: Catalan Modernisme (Gaudi)
Week 9: The Spanish avant-garde
Week 10: Picasso’s Guernica
Week 11: Unseen assessment & credit essay workshop.
9. Student intake

No prior knowledge of Spanish art will be needed.

A background in art history is useful but not a requirement.
10. Organisation of teaching

Lecture-based with discussion


11. Assessment strategy
Two components:

  • Assessment 1: unseen classroom assessment in the final week of the course, worth 25% of the total course mark

  • Assessment 2: 2000 word essay (seen assessment) submitted after the course finishes, worth 75% of the total course mark.

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks


12. Course Readings
Essential:

Brigstocke, Hugh. 1993 Italian and Spanish Paintings in the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland (second edition).


Recommended:

Ades, Dawn. 1982. Dali, London: Thames and Hudson

Carr, Raymond. 2000. Spain : a History, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Brown, Jonathan. 1998. Velázquez, The Technique of Genius, London: Yale University Press.

Brown, Jonathan. 1995. Kings and Connoisseurs, New Haven, London: Yale University Press.
Brown, Jonathan. 1986. Velázquez. Courtier and Painter, New Haven, London: Yale University Press.
Brown, Jonathan. 1991. The Golden Age of Painting in Spain 1500-1700, New Haven, London: Yale University Press.
Brown, Jonathan. 1990. Spanish painting of the fifteenth through nineteenth centuries, Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Brown, Jonathan. 1996. Picasso and the Spanish tradition, New Haven, London: Yale University Press.
Clarke, M. (ed.). 1996. Velázquez in Seville, Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland.
Cowling, Elizabeth. 2002. Picasso style and meaning, London: Phaidon.

Davies, D. 1989. El Greco, Mystery and Illumination, Edinburgh: National Gallery of Scotland.


Harris, Derek. 2005. The Spanish avant-garde, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Tomlinson, Janis. 1999. Francisco Goya y Lucientes, London: Phaidon Press.

Stratton, Suzanne. 1994. The Immaculate Conception in Spanish Art, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Stratton, Suzanne. 2002. The Cambridge Companion to Velázquez, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Class handouts:

Lecture summaries and notes for further reading
Course feedback & evaluation

The following procedures are applied to all OLL credit courses:


  • Course Organiser visits newly approved class at an early stage and provides the tutor with feedback on delivery.

  • Tutors are encouraged to discuss the course with students (collectively and individually), and act appropriately on responses.

  • Formal feedback is gathered from students via an online student survey. Results of these are analysed and provided for Course Organisers who may take appropriate action with the tutor.


UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

Approval of a New or Revised Course

All new courses should be created online via WISARD and approved online. This sheet should only be used for Continuing Education courses (or where the online process has failed).

† = Mandatory for Approval



Course Code - n/a

† Course Name

How Art Works: Credit Plus



† ‘Owning’ School : ACE/ OLL

College: CHSS

School Acronym for Course: n/a

Collaborating Body e.g. School or other Institution:

Additional Information on Collaboration:

† Course Level


U

† If PG, Modular

Master’s?



N/A

† If UG, Honours?


N/A

† Visiting Students

Only?


N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Course(s) being replaced

† Credit Points

10

† Credit Scheme

SCQF

† Credit Level

7

† Contact Teaching: 33 hours

Other Required Attendance: None

† Session course operational with effect from 2010-11

Scheduled Class Hours 33 hours over 11 weeks; OLL to schedule

Any costs which have to be met by students e.g. materials : None

Code(s) and Name(s) of any Prerequisite Courses N/A

Other Prerequisite Requirements N/A

Programme(s), Method(s) of Study and Year(s) of Study for which Course is Mandatory, or Optional but to be Seeded N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Prohibited Combinations N/A


Other Prohibited Combination Requirements N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Co-requisite Courses : N/A

Other Co-requisite Requirements N/A

† Short description of course
How does art work? How do form, colour, materials and social context inform the ways we can interpret works of art? Looking at major periods and styles, the course will introduce the basic tools of Art History such as visual, comparative and cultural analysis, furthering students’ understanding of the various descriptions used and how their meanings change over time through case studies of works of art from the Western Canon.

This course will provide an introduction to the academic discipline of art history and the skills needed to interpret visual culture and produce work for assessments. It will be a primer for people interested in other history of art classes or students of other disciplines such as History or Literature, and provide a good grounding in Humanities scholarship for Credit for Entry students.




† Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students should be able to



  • Objectively analyse material, form and content in works of art produced in western Europe between 650 BCE and the present

  • Understand, analyse and interpret secondary material both in terms of content, and just as importantly, methodology

  • Present arguments and visual analysis in coherent, well balanced well structured and well presented form


† Components of Assessment

Assessment 1: Unseen Assessment (Slide Quiz) Weighting 25%

Assessment 2: Essay of 2000 words, Weighting: 75%

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks



URL for supporting approval documentation

N/A

† Course Organiser Loura Brooks, MA Hons, Course Organiser, Open Studies

† Course Secretary N/A

Course URL (where not WebCT)




UG Courses Only: Year(s) in which course normally taken (e.g. 1, 1+2)

Summative Exams

Diet

(1st or 2nd)



Diet Month

Code

(e.g. 1, 2)



Paper Name (e.g. Paper 1)

Duration (hrs/mins)

Comments (e.g. Other courses with exam common content)

N/A

















N/A



















† Month Assessment Result Due (1st Diet)

February

† Month Assessment Result Due (2nd Diet)

May for courses starting in January, August for courses starting in April. Marks are confirmed by the meeting of the Final Assessment Board in August.



Chairman of Board of Examiners

† Default Course Mode of Study Class and Assignment

Course Organiser Comments (Internal Use Only)

Approved by/On behalf of

Date

Authorised signature

Name

Course Organiser

13.1.10




Loura Brooks

Convener, School BoS











Convener, College SC










Convener, SUGSC/SPGSC










Processed by Registry









1. Course title: How Art Works CREDIT PLUS


2. Tutor name(s): Loura Brooks
3. Tutor qualifications: MA Hons ( History of Art and English)
4. Rationale

This course will provide an introduction to the academic discipline of art history and the skills needed to interpret visual culture and produce work for assessments. It will be a primer for people interested in other history of art classes or students of other disciplines such as History or Literature, and a provide good grounding in Humanities scholarship for Credit for Entry students.


5. Course aims & objectives

Aims



  • interpretation of works of art and art history

Objectives



  • Introduce ways of making that interpretation better informed and more objectively critical
  • Impart the skills needed to address any literature on art, artists in its proper contexts


  • Develop students skills in academic writing

6. Intended learning outcomes

By the end of this course, students should be able to:


  • Objectively analyse material, form and content in works of art produced in western Europe between 650 BCE and the present

  • Understand, analyse and interpret secondary material both in terms of content, and just as importantly, methodology

  • Present arguments and visual analysis in coherent, well-balanced, well- structured and well-presented form

7. Transferable skills

Intellectual skills:


  • Analyzing and engaging critically with a wide range of visual material

  • Comparing and contrasting art works

  • Compiling and combining data for interpretation

  • Assimilating new knowledge

  • Reading independently

Communication skills:

  • Discussing within a group

  • Expressing ideas and thoughts

  • Listening actively

  • Taking part in a seminar course

8. Contents






Lectures

Skills

Week 1

The ‘unruly discipline’ What do art historians do?

Tools of the Trade part 1

Visual Analysis



Week 2

What is Art made of?

Tools of the Trade Part 2

Material Analysis


Week 3

What makes Art Different?


Tools of the Trade Part 3

Comparative Analysis



Week 4

IS a picture worth 1,000 words?


Tools of the Trade Part 4

Textual Analysis



Week 5

The Rise of the ISMS

Practice Essay due



Tools of the Trade Part 5

Cultural Analysis

Practice Slide Quiz


Week 6

Classicism

Case Studies: Greek and Roman Canons


Week 7

Gothicism

Case Studies: Medieval Canons

Gothic Revivals



Week 8

Classicism again

Case Studies:

The Renaissances



Week 9

Revolutionism

Case Studies:

Romanticism

Impressionism


Week10

Modernism / Postmodernism


Case Studies:

Futurism


Pop

YBAs


Week 11

Unseen assessment & credit essay workshop.




9. Student intake

Open to all
10. Organisation of teaching

Each class will consist of two hours of short lecture / discussion, with the third hour devoted to practical individual and group work on analytical and writing skills. The first five weeks of the course are devoted to the various skills that art historians deploy, the next five weeks the focus is on the characterises of major periods and styles.


11. Assessment strategy
Two components:

  • Assessment 1: unseen classroom assessment in the final week of the course, worth 25% of the total course mark

  • Assessment 2: 2000 word essay (seen assessment) submitted after the course finishes, worth 75% of the total course mark.

  • Students will have the opportunity for feedback on an outline proforma for their essay as well as a short formative visual analysis exercise and practice essay.

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks


12. Course Readings

Essential

Fernie, E. 1995. Art History and its Methods, London: Phaidon.
Honour, H. and J. Fleming. 1995. A World History of Art. 4th ed. London: Laurence King.

Gombrich, E. H. 2000. The Story of Art. 4th ed. London: Phaidon.

.Web sources

Metropolitan Museum of Art (2000) Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. [Online]. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/splash.htm [Accessed: 2 February 2009].


Delahunt, M. (1996) Artlex Art Dictionary. [Online]. Available at: http://www.artlex.com/ [Accessed: 2 February 2009].
Tate. The Tate Glossary. [Online]. Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/collections/glossary/ [Accessed: 2 February 2009].
Class handouts

Extensive handouts will be given at each class, consisting of timelines, texts, case studies, images and checklists for visual, comparative, textual and contextual analysis, as well as further reading lists for each period / style.


Course feedback & evaluation
The following procedures are applied to all OLL credit courses:

  • Course Organiser visits newly approved class at an early stage and provides the tutor with feedback on delivery.

  • Tutors are encouraged to discuss the course with students (collectively and individually), and act appropriately on responses.

  • Formal feedback is gathered from students via an online student survey. Results of these are analysed and provided for Course Organisers who may take appropriate action with the tutor.

UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

Approval of a New or Revised Course

All new courses should be created online via WISARD and approved online. This sheet should only be used for Continuing Education courses (or where the online process has failed).

† = Mandatory for Approval



Course Code - n/a

† Course Name

A History of Interior Design



† ‘Owning’ School : ACE/ OLL

College: CHSS

School Acronym for Course: n/a

Collaborating Body e.g. School or other Institution:

Additional Information on Collaboration:

† Course Level

U

† If PG, Modular

Master’s?



N/A

† If UG, Honours?


N/A

† Visiting Students

Only?


N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Course(s) being replaced

† Credit Points

10

† Credit Scheme

SCQF

† Credit Level

7

† Contact Teaching: 22 hours


Other Required Attendance: None

† Session course operational with effect from 2010-11

Scheduled Class Hours 22 hours over 11 weeks; OLL to schedule

Any costs which have to be met by students e.g. materials : None

Code(s) and Name(s) of any Prerequisite Courses N/A

Other Prerequisite Requirements N/A

Programme(s), Method(s) of Study and Year(s) of Study for which Course is Mandatory, or Optional but to be Seeded N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Prohibited Combinations N/A

Other Prohibited Combination Requirements N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Co-requisite Courses : N/A

Other Co-requisite Requirements N/A

† Short description of course

Interior Design is a subject both popular with, and misunderstood by the general public. The domestic interior has long been the subject of style magazine and makeover shows; and it is these media that have shaped public awareness of the discipline. This course is designed then to challenge the limited stereotype of interior design, and to provide students with the critical tools to question, and, perhaps challenge the quality of the interiors they encounter.


† Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students should be able to



  • Recognise categories of style and approach in interior design

  • Research a chosen case study or example of interior design

  • Debate the relationship between theory, context and artefact in a number of examples of interior design.

† Components of Assessment

Assessment 1: Unseen Assessment (Slide Quiz) Weighting 25%

Assessment 2: Essay of 2000 words, Weighting: 75%

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks



URL for supporting approval documentation

N/A

† Course Organiser Loura Brooks, MA Hons, Course Organiser, Open Studies

† Course Secretary N/A

Course URL (where not WebCT)




UG Courses Only: Year(s) in which course normally taken (e.g. 1, 1+2)

Summative Exams

Diet

(1st or 2nd)



Diet Month

Code

(e.g. 1, 2)


Paper Name (e.g. Paper 1)

Duration (hrs/mins)

Comments (e.g. Other courses with exam common content)

N/A



















N/A



















† Month Assessment Result Due (1st Diet)

February

† Month Assessment Result Due (2nd Diet)

May for courses starting in January, August for courses starting in April. Marks are confirmed by the meeting of the Final Assessment Board in August.



Chairman of Board of Examiners

† Default Course Mode of Study Class and Assignment

Course Organiser Comments (Internal Use Only)

Approved by/On behalf of

Date

Authorised signature


Name

Course Organiser

13.1.10




Loura Brooks

Convener, School BoS










Convener, College SC










Convener, SUGSC/SPGSC










Processed by Registry









1. Course title:

A History of Interior Design
2. Tutor name(s):

Edward Hollis

3. Tutor qualifications:

Edward Hollis runs the department of Interior design at Edinburgh College of Art, and is writes and researches on the subject of Interiors and Architecture. He is the author of The Secret Lives of Buildings, published by Portobello Books, and is currently working on a new book The Memory Palace: a Book of Lost Interiors

MA Cantab (Architecture), Dip. Arch (Edin) Registered Architect
4. Rationale

This course has proved popular as team-taught, however this is an opportunity for the course to be offered by a qualified architect and to allow OLL to build its portfolio of credit courses in this subject area..


5. Course aims & objectives

Aims


  • To introduce students to both the history of interior design and to the basic theoretical questions that underpin it.

  • To enable students to recognise and critically consider the many ways in which notions of inhabitation have been made manifest in constructed interiors.

Objectives



  • chronological and thematic survey of interior design history

  • observing and reflecting upon the relationship between theory, practice, and the physical environment in different times, places, and modes.

6. Intended learning outcomes


By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Recognise categories of style and approach in interior design




  • Research a chosen case study or example of interior design




  • Debate the relationship between theory, context and artefact in a number of examples of interior design.

7. Transferable skills

In the course of the programme, students develop skills in


  • communicating an approach to a particular issue in a concise, lucid and coherent form




  • critically analysing a wide variety of different source materials




  • evaluating different approaches to and explanations of material, and make critical choices between them



  • collecting and synthesising evidence from primary and secondary sources





  • comparing different sets of evidence to reach conclusions, using various types of comparators




  • appreciating cultural differences and cross-currents




  • exercising informed critical judgement

8. Contents


Week 1 Introduction: the problem with Interiors
Week 2 The Labyrinth: mythical origins of the Interior
Week 3 Pliny’s Villa to the Sacred Palace: the Roman Interior
Week 4 The Vault of Heaven: Sacred Interiors of the Middle Ages
Week 5 Meubles and Immeubles: The secular medieval interior
Week 6 Cabinets of Curiosity: the Renaissance
Week 7 Theatres and Masques: Baroque and Rococo settings
Week 8 A Great Exhibition: the modern consumer interior
Week 9 Style Wars: Modernism vs Decoration
Week 10 The Diary Room: the contemporary Interior
Week 11: Unseen assessment & credit essay workshop

9. Student intake


Open to all no previous knowledge required

10. Organisation of teaching


Lecture-based with time for discussions
11. Assessment strategy
Two components:

  • Assessment 1: unseen classroom assessment in the final week of the course, worth 25% of the total course mark

  • Assessment 2: 2000 word essay (seen assessment) submitted after the course finishes, worth 75% of the total course mark.

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks

12. Course Readings

Essential

Pile, John. 2000. History of Interior Design , London: Wiley.
Praz, Mario (tr. Weaver, William). 1964. An Illustrated History of Interior Decoration from Pompeii to Part Nouveau. London: Thames and Hudson.
Recommended
Massey, Anne. 1990. Interior Design of the 20th Century. London: Thames and Hudson
Parissien, Steve. 2008. Interiors The Home Since 1700. London: Laurence King

Class handouts will be provided with details of images shown an advice for further reading


Course feedback & evaluation
The following procedures are applied to all OLL credit courses:

  • Course Organiser visits newly approved class at an early stage and provides the tutor with feedback on delivery.

  • Tutors are encouraged to discuss the course with students (collectively and individually), and act appropriately on responses.

  • Formal feedback is gathered from students via an online student survey. Results of these are analysed and provided for Course Organisers who may take appropriate action with the tutor.


UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

Approval of a New or Revised Course

All new courses should be created online via WISARD and approved online. This sheet should only be used for Continuing Education courses (or where the online process has failed).

† = Mandatory for Approval


Course Code - n/a

† Course Name: Orientalism in European Painting

† ‘Owning’ School : ACE/ OLL

College: CHSS

School Acronym for Course: n/a

Collaborating Body e.g. School or other Institution: n/a

Additional Information on Collaboration:

† Course Level

U

† If PG, Modular

Master’s?



N/A

† If UG, Honours?


N/A

† Visiting Students

Only?


N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Course(s) being replaced

† Credit Points

10

† Credit Scheme

SCQF

† Credit Level

7

† Contact Teaching: 22 hours

Other Required Attendance:

† Session course operational with effect from 2010

Scheduled Class Hours 22 hours over 11 weeks; OLL to schedule


Any costs which have to be met by students e.g. materials : None

Code(s) and Name(s) of any Prerequisite Courses N/A

Other Prerequisite Requirements N/A

Programme(s), Method(s) of Study and Year(s) of Study for which Course is Mandatory, or Optional but to be Seeded N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Prohibited Combinations N/A

Other Prohibited Combination Requirements N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Co-requisite Courses : N/A

Other Co-requisite Requirements N/A

† Short description of course

This course examines the interface between postcolonial studies and Orientalism in nineteenth-century European art and architecture. The main focus is on the representation of the people and places in the Middle East and North Africa. Responses to Spain’s Islamic past will also be examined. The aim is to explore what characterised the representations of the ‘Orient’ by European artists, with reference to their immediate historical and artistic contexts, and also in relation to the broader history of the relationship between East and West.



† Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students should be able to


  • understand the development of Orientalism in European painting (mostly British, French, Spanish) within the context of European imperialism


  • understand the tenets of postcolonial theory; the concept of ‘Otherness’ or the ‘Other’; the relationship between power and knowledge

  • have in-depth knowledge of prominent works by key artists/architects

  • be able to analyse and interpret a work of art, using the appropriate art historical vocabulary

  • be able to engage critically with the scholarship on the subject




† Components of Assessment

Assessment 1: Unseen Assessment (Slide Quiz) Weighting 25%

Assessment 2: Essay of 2000 words, Weighting: 75%
Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks


URL for supporting approval documentation

N/A

† Course Organiser Loura Brooks, MA Hons, Course Organiser, Open Studies

† Course Secretary N/A

Course URL (where not WebCT)




UG Courses Only: Year(s) in which course normally taken (e.g. 1, 1+2)

Summative Exams

Diet

(1st or 2nd)



Diet Month

Code

(e.g. 1, 2)

Paper Name (e.g. Paper 1)


Duration (hrs/mins)

Comments (e.g. Other courses with exam common content)

N/A



















N/A



















† Month Assessment Result Due (1st Diet)

February

† Month Assessment Result Due (2nd Diet)

May for courses starting in January, August for courses starting in April. Marks are confirmed by the meeting of the Final Assessment Board in August.



Chairman of Board of Examiners

† Default Course Mode of Study Class and Assignment

Course Organiser Comments (Internal Use Only)

Approved by/On behalf of

Date

Authorised signature


Name

Course Organiser

13.1.10




Loura Brooks

Convener, School BoS










Convener, College SC










Convener, SUGSC/SPGSC










Processed by Registry









1. Course title: Orientalism in European Painting


2. Tutor name(s): Dr. Claudia Heide
3. Tutor qualifications: MA, MSc, PhD History of Art
4. Rationale

This course explores nineteenth-century responses to the so-called Orient by European artists and architects. There is currently no provision at OLL for study of Orientalism in Western art and architecture.

5. Course aims & objectives

Aim:


To examine the interface between postcolonial studies and Orientalism in nineteenth-century European art and architecture.
Objectives:

  • focus on the representation of the people and places in the Middle East and North Africa

  • examine responses to Spain’s Islamic past

  • explore what characterised the representations of the ‘Orient’ by European artists, with reference to their immediate historical and artistic contexts

  • explore how other concerns, such as gender and class, could shape representations of the East

6. Intended learning outcomes

By the end of this course, students should:


  • understand the development of Orientalism in European painting (mostly British, French, Spanish) within the context of European imperialism

  • understand the tenets of postcolonial theory; the concept of ‘Otherness’ or the ‘Other’; the relationship between power and knowledge

  • have in-depth knowledge of prominent works by key artists/architects

  • be able to analyze and interpret a work of art, using the appropriate art historical vocabulary

  • be able to engage critically with the scholarship on the subject

7. Transferable skills



  • analytical skills (visual and textual analysis)

  • critical thinking

  • comparative skills

  • participation in discussion

8. Contents
Week 1: Introduction
Week 2: Edward Said and his critics
Week 3: Visit to the National Gallery of Scotland: William Allan’s Slavemarket
Week 4: Romanticism and Oriental Obsessions

Week 5: The ‘Orient’ of the past: European Artists in the Alhambra

Week 6: The ‘Orient’ in British architecture and design
Week 7: Representations of everyday life
Week 8: The Harem: ‘Only women should go to Turkey’
Week 9: Photographers in Constantinople
Week 10: Conclusions
Week 11: Unseen assessment & credit essay workshop.
9. Student intake

No prior knowledge of the topic will be needed.

A background in art history or history is useful but not a requirement.
10. Organisation of teaching

Lecture-based with discussion


11. Assessment strategy

Two components:



  • Assessment 1: unseen classroom assessment in the final week of the course, worth 25% of the total course mark

  • Assessment 2: 2000 word essay (seen assessment) submitted after the course finishes, worth 75% of the total course mark.

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks


12. Course Readings

Essential:

Said, Edward. 2003. Orientalism: Western Conceptions of the Orient. London: Penguin Modern Classics.
Recommended:

Benjamin, R.1997. Orientalism: Delacroix to Klee, Sydney: The Art Gallery of New South Wales.


Clark, Steve, ed., 1999. Travel Writing and Empire: Postcolonial Theory in Transit, London: Zed Books.

Crinson, Mark. 1996. Empire Building. Orientalism and Victorian Architecture, London: Routledge.

Sweetman, John. 1991. The Oriental Obsession, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Tromans, N. 2008. The Lure of the East. British Orientalist Painting. London: Tate Publishing.
Class handouts:

Lecture summaries and notes for further reading


Course feedback & evaluation
The following procedures are applied to all OLL credit courses:

  • Course Organiser visits newly approved class at an early stage and provides the tutor with feedback on delivery.

  • Tutors are encouraged to discuss the course with students (collectively and individually), and act appropriately on responses.

  • Formal feedback is gathered from students via an online student survey. Results of these are analysed and provided for Course Organisers who may take appropriate action with the tutor.


UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

Approval of a New or Revised Course

All new courses should be created online via WISARD and approved online. This sheet should only be used for Continuing Education courses (or where the online process has failed).

† = Mandatory for Approval



Course Code - n/a

† Course Name

Modernism in Art: An Introduction



† ‘Owning’ School : ACE/ OLL

College: CHSS


School Acronym for Course: n/a

Collaborating Body e.g. School or other Institution:

Additional Information on Collaboration:

† Course Level

U

† If PG, Modular

Master’s?



N/A

† If UG, Honours?


N/A

† Visiting Students

Only?


N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Course(s) being replaced

† Credit Points

10

† Credit Scheme

SCQF

† Credit Level

7

† Contact Teaching: 22 hours

Other Required Attendance: None

† Session course operational with effect from 2010-11

Scheduled Class Hours 22 hours over 11 weeks; OLL to schedule

Any costs which have to be met by students e.g. materials : None

Code(s) and Name(s) of any Prerequisite Courses N/A


Other Prerequisite Requirements N/A

Programme(s), Method(s) of Study and Year(s) of Study for which Course is Mandatory, or Optional but to be Seeded N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Prohibited Combinations N/A

Other Prohibited Combination Requirements N/A

Code(s) and Name(s) of Co-requisite Courses : N/A

Other Co-requisite Requirements N/A

† Short description of course

Taking account of early avant-garde practices, this course aims to provide a critical introduction to the radical and innovative artistic movements that characterise Modernism. Starting with the Salon de Refusés (1863) and moving through Impressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism and Dada (amongst others) the course provides a rich account of the historical and artistic context against which key artists and designers attempted to reshape the way we look at and live in the world.




† Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students should be able to



  • Understand the critical legacy of avant-garde movements.

  • Engage critically with the visual and theoretical aspects of Modern art practices.

  • Display knowledge of key artists, designers and writers associated with Modernism.

  • Apply the ideas covered in this course to a range of visual and cultural artefacts in a creative and productive fashion.

† Components of Assessment

Assessment 1: Unseen Assessment (Slide Quiz) Weighting 25%

Assessment 2: Essay of 2000 words, Weighting: 75%

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks



URL for supporting approval documentation

N/A

† Course Organiser Loura Brooks, MA Hons, Course Organiser, Open Studies

† Course Secretary N/A

Course URL (where not WebCT)




UG Courses Only: Year(s) in which course normally taken (e.g. 1, 1+2)

Summative Exams

Diet

(1st or 2nd)



Diet Month

Code

(e.g. 1, 2)



Paper Name (e.g. Paper 1)

Duration (hrs/mins)

Comments (e.g. Other courses with exam common content)

N/A

















N/A



















† Month Assessment Result Due (1st Diet)

February

† Month Assessment Result Due (2nd Diet)

May for courses starting in January, August for courses starting in April. Marks are confirmed by the meeting of the Final Assessment Board in August.



Chairman of Board of Examiners

† Default Course Mode of Study Class and Assignment

Course Organiser Comments (Internal Use Only)

Approved by/On behalf of

Date

Authorised signature

Name

Course Organiser

13.1.10




Loura Brooks

Convener, School BoS











Convener, College SC










Convener, SUGSC/SPGSC










Processed by Registry









1. Course title: Modernism in Art: An Introduction


2. Tutor name(s): James Clegg
3. Tutor qualifications: MSc, BA Hons
4. Rationale:

Our Postmodernism in Art: An Introduction class has been very successful and developing a course that would offer students a compatible and comparable introduction to Modernism would complement this subject area. Though this course could be seen to stand alone, offering a very valuable overview of the radical changes in art from around 1850- 1950, it would also offer a strong foundation for those moving on to study postmodernism.


5. Course aims & objectives

Aims:


  • to provide a critical introduction to the radical and innovative artistic movements that characterise Modernism
  • examining avant-gardism in art, starting with the Salon de Refusés (1863) and moving through Impressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism and Dada (amongst others)


  • accounting for the historical and artistic context against which key artists and designers attempted to reshape the way we look at and live in the world.

Objectives:




  • Provide a clear insight into how artists and designers related utopian or anarchic aspirations to visual innovation.

  • Explore the reasons and motivations for avant-garde assaults on pictorial conventions and the art establishment.

  • Critically summarise the reach and impact of Modernism.

6. Intended learning outcomes

By the end of this course, students should be able to:


  • Understand the critical legacy of avant-garde movements.

  • Engage critically with the visual and theoretical aspects of Modern art practices.

  • Display knowledge of key artists, designers and writers associated with Modernism.

  • Apply the ideas covered in this course to a range of visual and cultural artefacts in a creative and productive fashion.

7. Transferable skills




  • Visual Literacy

  • Critical Thinking

  • Experience of seminar discussions and group debates.

8. Contents


Week 1: Salon des Refusés: Breaking with the Academy
Week 2: Flirting with controversy: Courbet and taboo in 19th Century Europe
Week 3: Introducing Subjectivity: From Impressionism to Cubism
Week 4: Picasso’s Exorcism: fear of ‘Primitives’ and ‘Prostitutes’
Week 5: “Standing on the World’s Summit”: Futurism’s becoming...
Week 6: Revolution and Rebuilding: Constructivism, De Stijl and the Bauhaus

Week 7: DaDA & ?@$ SuRREAl:sm

Week 8: Reflections upon a Modern World (An Introduction to some key thinkers)
Week 9: Abstract Expressionism and the Rise of Formalism
Week 10: In Jeopardy: Idealism, Authenticity, Universality and the Avant-Garde
Week 11: Unseen assessment & credit essay workshop.
9. Student intake

Being an introduction this course should be accessible to all students.


10. Organisation of teaching

Each week involves a 2 hour session built around a key Lecture. Additional activities such as discussions, visual literacy quizzes and weekly reading materials will also be included to stimulate learning and independent study.

11. Assessment strategy

Two components:



  • Assessment 1: unseen classroom assessment ( slide quiz) in the final week of the course, worth 25% of the total course mark

  • Assessment 2: 2000 word essay (seen assessment) submitted after the course finishes, worth 75% of the total course mark.

Students must achieve a minimum of 30% in each assessment and an overall pass mark for all components of 40% of available course assessment marks

12. Course Readings

Essential

Frascina & Harris. Ed. 1992. Art in Modern Culture.  London: Phaidon.


Harrison, C. 1997. Modernism. London: Tate Gallery.
Recommended

Britt, D. 2007. Modern Art: Impressionism to Post-Modernism. London: Thames and Hudson.

Foster, H. ed. 2004. Art since 1900: Modernism, Anti Modernism, Postmodernism. London: Thames & Hudson.

Harrison, Frascina and Perry. Eds. 1993. Primitivism, Cubism, Abstraction – The Early Twentieth Century. London: Open University Press.
Wilk, C. 2008. Modernism: Designing a New World. London: V&A.
Weekly handouts will be provided with lists of images shown and advice for further reading.
Course feedback & evaluation
The following procedures are applied to all OLL credit courses:


  • Course Organiser visits newly approved class at an early stage and provides the tutor with feedback on delivery.

  • Tutors are encouraged to discuss the course with students (collectively and individually), and act appropriately on responses.

  • Formal feedback is gathered from students via an online student survey. Results of these are analysed and provided for Course Organisers who may take appropriate action with the tutor.


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