Science – Grade 4 Unit of Study: Exploring the Physical Properties of Matter Third Grading Period – Weeks 1 – Week 2 Monday curriculum overview



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Science – Grade 4


Unit of Study: Exploring the Physical Properties of Matter

Third Grading Period – Weeks 1 – Week 2 Monday CURRICULUM OVERVIEW

Enduring Understandings (Big Idea)

Unit Rationale

All matter has physical properties that can be observed, described, and measured. Under normal conditions, most matter exists as a solid, a liquid, or a gas. The physical properties of matter generally remain constant and serve as tenets for identification of it.

Students design experiments and use tools of scientific inquiry to measure, compare, and contrast a variety of mixtures and solutions. They will also measure the masses and weights and predict changes caused by heating and cooling.

Heat is usually responsible for changes in the physical states of matter and in this unit the heat from the Sun to cause evaporation will play an important part in the separation of a mixture

To compare and classify matter according to its physical properties.

To recognize that heat is responsible for changes in the physical state of matter.

To understand that when two or more kinds of matter are combined, the result is a mixture. When two or more materials are mixed and they dissolve into each other, a special kind of mixture results, a solution.

During this unit of study, students will be using the scientific method to conduct tests, compare data, and draw conclusions about the physical properties of matter and the physical properties of mixtures and solutions.


The students will discuss the tools used in this unit as systems and use them in their efforts to separate the mixtures and solutions that they create.


Essential Questions

Guiding Questions

Week 1 Tues. – Wed.

  • What is the difference between a mixture and a solution? (TEKS 4.5A, C)

  • Are all solutions mixtures? Are all mixtures solutions? Explain. (TEKS 4.5A, C)

  • What changes occurred in the physical properties of the ingredients of the salt and water solution? Explain (TEKS 4.5A & C)

Week 1 Thursday

  • What is the difference between mass and weight? (TEKS 4.2C)

  • How do you use a balance scale to measure mass? Draw and label pictures with your explanation. (TEKS 4.4A)

Week 1 Friday

  • Did the salt maintain its physical properties of its ingredients when mixed with water? (TEKS 4.5A,C) ) How did you demonstrate this?

  • What changes occurred in the physical properties of the salt and water when they were mixed? (TEKS 4.5A & C)

  • Can a solution be separated? Explain. (TEKS 4.5A)
  • What form of energy drives the process of evaporation? (TEKS 4.8A)


Week 2 Monday

  • What physical properties made the solids easy to separate? (4.5A)

  • What are some physical properties of the mixtures? (4.5A)

  • How was this mixture like or different from the salt water solution? Explain. (TEKS 4.5C)

Week 1 Tues. – Wed.

  • How would you classify the three cups based on their physical properties, as mixtures or solutions? Explain. (TEKS 4.5A)

  • Did the salt and water, gravel and water, and powder and water mixtures maintain the physical properties of their ingredients? Explain. (4.5A, C)

  • Explain how you collected and analyzed information using tools. What tools did you use? Explain. (TEKS 4.4A)

  • Can a syringe be classified as a system? Why? What about a funnel? Why? (TEKS 2.5D, TEKS Introduction)

  • What would happen if the plunger was removed from a syringe? Would it still be an effective tool? (TEKS 2.5D, 4.2D)

  • Create a Venn Diagram that compares/contrasts the filter paper and the screen as tools. (TEKS 4.2C, 4.4A)

Week 1 Thursday

  • What physical properties does the salt and water solution have that classify it as a solution and a mixture? (TEKS 4.5A & C.)
  • What change occurs in the physical properties of the two ingredients (salt and water) when we added them together? (TEKS 4.5C)


Week 1 Friday

  • Do you think that salt could be classified by its crystal shape and form? Explain. (TEKS 4.5A)

  • How did the matter change with the addition of heat from the Sun? (4.5B)

  • Why evaporation is considered a process? Explain. (TEKS 4.5B)

  • What test did you conduct to investigate how a solution could be separated? (TEKS 4.2A, 4.5A & C)

Week 2 Monday

  • How could you classify the solids that you separated? Explain. (TEKS 4.5A)

  • How are the mixtures the same? How are they different? (4.5C)




TEKS

TEKS Specificity - Intended Outcome

Concepts

TEK 4.5 Physical Science. Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to:

(A)  measure, compare, and contrast physical properties of matter, including

size, mass, volume, states (solid, liquid, gas), temperature, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float;


I can…

  • explore and recognize that a mixture is created when two materials are combined

  • classify matter by physical properties including shape, relative mass, relative temperature, texture, flexibility, and whether material is a solid or liquid. (2.5A)

  • describe and classify matter as solids, liquids, and gases (TEKS 3.5A,B)

  • measure, compare, and contrast the physical properties of matter. (4.5A)

(B)  predict the changes caused by heating and cooling such as ice becoming liquid water and condensation forming on the outside of a glass of ice water; and

(C)  compare and contrast a variety of mixtures and solutions such as rocks in sand, sand in water, or sugar in water.


3.5A Physical Science. Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to:

(A)  measure, test, and record physical properties of matter, including temperature, mass, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float;

(B)  describe and classify samples of matter as solids, liquids, and gases and demonstrate that solids have a definite shape and that liquids and gases take the shape of their container;

(C)  predict, observe, and record changes in the state of matter caused by heating or cooling; and

(D)  explore and recognize that a mixture is created when two materials are combined such as gravel and sand and metal and plastic paper clips.


3.6C Physical Science. Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that forces cause change and that energy exists in many forms. The student is expected to:

(C)  observe forces such as magnetism and gravity acting on objects.



2.5A Physical Science. Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has physical properties and those properties determine how it is described, classified, changed, and used. The student sis expected to:

(A) classify matter by physical properties including shape, relative mass, relative temperature, texture, flexibility, and whether material is a solid or liquid. (2.5A)

(B)  compare changes in materials caused by heating and cooling.



  • compare and contrast a variety of mixtures and solutions and the changes that can occur in the physical properties of the ingredients of solutions (TEKS 4.5A)

  • can classify mixtures based on their physical properties. (4.5A)

  • identify the changes in the physical properties of salt when it is added to water to make a solution. (4.5A & C)

  • construct reasonable explanations about the difference between mass and weight. (4.5A)

  • balances to mass a solution before and after its parts have been separated. (4.4A)
  • compare and contrast the physical properties of solutions (4.5C)


  • conduct tests to separate a salt solution by its physical properties (4.5A,C)

  • use the scientific method to implement and investigation to separate a mixture by its physical properties. (4.2A-F)

  • measure, compare and contrast the physical properties of dry mixtures to liquid ones. (4.2C, 4.5A & C)

  • observe and record changes in the states of matter caused by the addition or reduction of heat (TEKS 4.5B)

  • identify changes that can occur in the physical properties of the ingredients of solutions (TEKS 4.5A)

  • describe some cycles, structures, and processes that interact (TEKS 5.5A)

  • describe some interactions in a simple system (TEKS 2.5D, 4.6)

  • Investigate and draw conclusions about the particle arrangement in solids, liquids, and gases based on their densities. (4.2B-D, 3.7B)

  • develop a good hypothesis and justify my thinking in my hypothesis statements as I investigate buoyancy and the densities of various objects. (4.2A-D,4.7B)




  • use scientific evidence from my investigations on buoyancy and density to support my discoveries and ideas (4.2C)
  • apply what I have learned about testing the buoyancy and density of items to a new situation. (4.2C, 4.7B)





TEKS 4. 1 The Nature of Science. Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student conducts classroom and outdoor investigations, following home and school safety procedures and environmentally appropriate and ethical practices. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe practices and the use of safety equipment as described in the Texas Safety Standards during classroom and outdoor investigations; and

(B)  make informed choices in the use and conservation of natural resources and reusing and recycling of materials such as paper, aluminum, glass, cans, and plastic.


  • demonstrate safe practices during lab investigations (TEKS 4.1A)

  • make wise choices in the use, conservation, and disposal of materials (TEKS 4.1A)

  • plan and implement experimental investigations including asking well-defined questions, forming testable hypotheses, and selecting and using equipment and technology (when applicable) (TEKS 4.2A)

  • collect information by observing and measuring (TEKS 4.2B)

  • analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable explanations from direct and/or indirect evidence (TEKS 4.2D)
  • demonstrate that repeated investigations increase the reliability of results (TEKS 4.2E)


  • communicate valid conclusions both written and orally (TEKS 4.2F)

TEKS 4.2 The Nature of Science. Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to:

(A)  plan and implement descriptive investigations, including asking well-defined questions, making inferences, and selecting and using appropriate equipment or technology to answer his/her questions;

(B)  collect and record data by observing and measuring, using the metric system, and using descriptive words and numerals such as labeled drawings, writing, and concept maps;

(C)  construct simple tables, charts, bar graphs, and maps using tools and current technology to organize, examine, and evaluate data;

(D)  analyze data and interpret patterns to construct reasonable explanations from data that can be observed and measured;

(E)  perform repeated investigations to increase the reliability of results; and

(F)  communicate valid, oral, and written results supported by data.

TEKS 4.3 The Nature of Science. Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses critical thinking and scientific problem solving to make informed decisions. The student is expected to:

for toys, food, and sunscreen;

(A)  in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing,

including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;

(B)  draw inferences and evaluate accuracy of services and product claims found in advertisements and labels such as




  • construct simple graphs, tables, maps, and charts, using tools including computers, to organize, examine, and evaluate information (TEKS 4.2C)

  • collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including calculators, microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, mirrors, spring scales, pan balances, triple beam balances, graduated cylinders, beakers, hot plates, meter sticks, compasses, magnets, collecting nets, and notebooks; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; and materials to support observation of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and (TEKS 4.4A)

  • (B)  use safety equipment as appropriate, including safety goggles and gloves.

  • investigate, compare, and draw conclusions about the density of a solid and its ability to sink or float and about a liquid based on how it layers in a density column. (4.2A)

  • organize, record, and compare my data into my science journal about my scientific investigations in the following forms – including, but not limited to:

  • charts, graphs, and tables

  • use the data to find the mean
  • construct a graph to compare the weight of objects in and out of water (4.2E)


  • measure and graph the weight of fresh water vs. salt water

  • detailed drawings

  • labeled illustrations

  • important vocabulary words

  • detailed explanations (4.2E)

  • use scientific evidence to analyze, review, and critique scientific explanations about the properties of buoyancy and density investigations. (4.3A)

  • use a balance to analyze information about solutions and their parts. (4.4A)

  • demonstrate that repeating investigations makes the results more reliable. (4.4B)

  • share and present my findings and conclusions to my teacher and to the class about how various physical properties affect the buoyancy of objects, including size design, shape, displacement, and volume. (4.2D)

  • draw conclusions about how the weight and size of an object affects its ability to sink or float (4.2D)

(C)  represent the natural world using models such as rivers,

stream tables, or fossils and identify their limitations,

including accuracy and size; and

(D)  connect grade-level appropriate science concepts with

the history of science, science careers, and contributions of scientists.

TEKS 4.4 The Nature of Science. Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools, materials, equipment, and models to conduct science inquiry. The student is expected to:

(A)  collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including calculators, microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, mirrors, spring scales, pan balances, triple beam balances, graduated cylinders, beakers, hot plates, meter sticks, compasses, magnets, collecting nets, and notebooks; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; and materials to support observation of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and

(B)  use safety equipment as appropriate, including safety goggles and gloves.







ELPS Student Expectations

ELPS Specificity - Intended Outcome

Listening

c2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar;



Speaking

c3D  speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency;

c3E  share information in cooperative learning interactions;

Reading

c4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text;



Writing

c5G   narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.



Students will be provided opportunities to:

c2G understand the meaning, main points, and important details of directions, investigation, and discussion of results.

c3B speak using grade level content vocabulary describing the science investigation

c3C share information in cooperative groups.

c4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers,

illustrations, and pretaught science vocabulary

c5C narrate, describe, and explain with specificity and detail content area writing.


College Readiness Student Expectations

College Readiness - Intended Outcome

Science Standards

IA Nature of Science: Scientific Ways of Learning and Thinking

2. Use creativity and insight to recognize and describe patterns in natural phenomena.

3. Formulate appropriate questions to test understanding of natural phenomena.

IB Scientific Inquiry

1. Design and conduct scientific investigations in which hypotheses are formulated and tested.



IC Collaborative and safe working practices

1. Collaborate on joint projects.

2. Understand and apply safe procedures in the laboratory and field, including chemical, electrical, and fire safety and safe handling of live or preserved organisms.

IE Effective Communication of Scientific Information

2. Use essential vocabulary of the discipline being studied.



Students will be provided opportunities to:

IA2d Examine and analyze new situations or problems in light of previously understood principles

IA3a Determine what additional data needs to be collected to draw conclusions from a given series of observations.

IB1a Develop hypotheses that lead to if/then predictions and know that hypotheses leading to accurate predictions are tentatively accepted, while hypotheses that lead to inaccurate prediction are rejected or discarded.

IC1a Work in teams and share responsibilities acknowledging, encouraging, and valuing contributions of all team members.

IC2a Use Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) information and demonstrate safe laboratory practices.

IE2a Define and use a basic set of technical terms correctly and in context for each discipline studied.


Evidence of Learning (Summative Assessment)

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will make wise safety decisions and demonstrate safe practices with 100% accuracy (B) as documented by using a safety rubric (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to describe cycles, structures, processes, and interactions found in a simple system (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to plan and implement descriptive and simple experimental investigations including asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and selecting and using equipment and technology (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to collect information by observing and measuring (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable explanations from direct and indirect evidence (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to communicate valid conclusions (B) with at least 80%v accuracy. (CR)

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to construct simple graphs, tables, maps, and charts using tools including computers to organize, examine, and evaluate information (B) with at least 80% accuracy. (CR)

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to connect Grade 4 science concepts with the history of science and contributions of scientists (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to collect and analyze information using tools including calculators, microscopes, cameras, sound recorders, computers, hand lenses, rulers, thermometers, compasses, balances, hot plates, meter sticks, timing devices, magnets, collecting nets, and safety goggles (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to demonstrate the repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to measure, compare, and contrast the physical properties of matter based (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).

During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to compare and contrast a variety of mixtures and solutions (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).



During classroom and field investigations (CN), students will be able to predict the changes in the states of matter caused by heating and cooling (B) with at least 80% accuracy (CR).


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