See-Ya Ice Breaker Submitted by: Rebecca Berger, wvu materials: None Directions



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See-Ya Ice Breaker

Submitted by: Rebecca Berger, WVU

Materials:

None
Directions:



  • Have the entire group split randomly into groups of three people. Once in groups of three, individuals will introduce themselves to their group and tell everyone where they work and the position they hold.




  • The training facilitator will ask all of the groups the same question at the same time and the questions are made relevant to the training. For example, “What is your funniest story about providing an accommodation?”




  • The individual groups vote on which of the three members has the “best” story. The “best” stories are then shared with the entire training group. The participant who was voted to have the “best” story will leave and find another group. The group says “See-ya” to the departing member.




  • New groups are formed with two original members and a new member from another group. The training facilitator then asks a second question, “What was your most frustrating challenge related to accessibility of a facility?” Again, the individual groups vote on which of the three members has the “best” story. The “best” stories are then shared with the entire training group. The participant who was voted to have the “best” story will leave and find another group. The group says “See-ya” to the departing member.



  • A new group of three members is formed and the training facilitator will ask the third question, “What is your most rewarding experience in providing an accommodation or working with a student, employee or consumer?” Again, the individual groups vote on which of the three members has the “best” story. The “best” stories are then shared with the entire training group. After the final question all the participants are asked to stand and say again “See-ya” and return to their original seats.

This ice breaker can be used with many groups in many situations because the questions are made relevant to the specific training or group experience. I have used this ice breaker with children and adults in various settings including education, training and counseling.


I like this ice breaker because it allows the facilitator to individualize the questions they are asking and therefore bring up relevant topics of discussion. The participant’s answers provide insight into their experiences and knowledge. Dividing the large group into smaller groups makes some people feel more comfortable and the rotation ensures that the group members will interact with more than the original two in the first group.



ACCESSIBILITY & OTHER NOTES:




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