Self-Study Report 2003 I. Environmental scan a. Sociology, Anthropology & the World



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VII. PROGRAM REVIEW MEASURES


1. Enrollment & Graduation Trends
The Department of Sociology & Anthropology’s total FTE’s rose by 25.5% from 1997-98 to 2002-03 (Table 8 and Figures 2-4; see Appendices D and I). The Department’s annual number of undergraduate majors has remained flat since 1997-98 (as majors in International Relations, Political Science, and Psychology have grown), but its overall undergraduate FTE’s have climbed by 21%. While the Department’s FTIC retention rate (71%) is 3% lower than the College of Arts & Sciences average, its AA Transfer retention rate (63%) is, strikingly, 23% higher than the College average. Continued improvements in the Department’s curriculum, including its nexus with South Florida’s communities, promise to boost undergraduate enrollment, major, and retention figures in coming years in proportion to increases in FIU’s institutional support of the Department.

Although the Department’s graduate FTE’s have dropped since the late 1990s and its number of graduate majors has dropped since 2000-01 (Table 8, Figures 2-4; see Appendices D and I), these trends are entangled with its outstanding success in awarding M.A.’s and Ph.D.’s: 15 M.A.’s in 2002-03; a yearly average of 7.3 M.A.’s in 2000-03; nine Ph.D.’s in 2000-01; and a yearly average of 5.5 Ph.D.’s in 2000-03.9 The Department’s focus on educating doctoral students is evident in two other measures of outstanding success: its doctoral graduation rate (52%) is some 27%

higher than the Arts & Sciences norm, while its doctoral retention rate (71%) is 28% higher than the College standard. This record is remarkable in that it coincides with pronounced attrition in the Department’s number of faculty members. It also coincides with the fact that several faculty members hold FIU administrative appointments, and that several faculty members are likely to be on leave during any academic year.

Table 8

FTE’s, Majors, and Degrees


FTE’s

96-97

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

02-03

Lower

185

157

154

168

169

168

177

Upper

241

238

250

266


305

306

338

Total Undergraduate

426

395

404

434

474

474

515

Graduate










24

21

25

21

Thesis/Diss.










10

14

8

6

Total Graduate

30

37

36

34

34

32

27


Total

457

432

441

468

508

506

542

Majors

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

Intended

29

28

27

32

35

38

36

Upper

108

100

100

101


94

93

104

Total Undergraduate

137

128

127

133

129

131

140

Master

31

29

23

17

26

22

14

Doctoral

29

34

31

31

32

22

25

Total Graduate

60

63

54

48

58

44

39

Total

197

191

181


181

187

175

179

Degrees

96-97

97-98

98-99

99-00

00-01

01-02

02-03

Bachelor

39

63

43

46

45

49

38

Master

4

5

7

10

3

1

15

Doctoral

--

1

1

4

9

4


5

Total

43

69

51

60

57

54

58


Figure 2: Sociology and Anthropology

FTE’s, Majors, and Degrees Conferred


Figure 3: Sociology and Anthropology

FTE History


Figure 4: Sociology and Anthropology

Majors History

The graduate record stands to improve with the replacement of departed faculty members; the addition of 12 new graduate assistantships, some of which should involve enhanced funding; increased faculty and staff salaries to the national average for Research I universities (see XII.B concerning faculty salaries); substantial upgrades in departmental space and in departmental as well as university infrastructure; revisions in the graduate curriculum; and external fund raising to support these aspirations. The Department’s production of M.A.’s and Ph.D’s. will rise in direct proportion to the extent of implementation of such improvements, including the initiation of GIS courses, the possible implementation of a master’s evaluation research track, and expanded faculty and offerings in the area of environment and sustainability.





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