Shhs grade 10 Summer Reading Requirements 2017



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SHHS Grade 10 Summer Reading Requirements 2017

These summer reading selections represent authors and issues that are addressed in the tenth grade curriculum. This list is offered to help prepare you for next year’s studies. The faculty and administration believe that it is very important for students to continue reading during the summer months. In September or January, teachers in Language Arts classes will provide opportunities for students to discuss their summer reading, and will use the required material as a springboard to assignments for their course. To this end, your teachers will test you on your knowledge and understanding of the required readings. It is strongly recommended that you take detailed notes about plot, characters, your questions, and your reactions as you read, and that you review your notes carefully before the first day of class. A caution: viewing available films based on these books should not be considered a replacement for reading the texts.


TENTH GRADE REQUIRED READINGS This year you will explore many views of the American Dream and the American Experience.


Honors Language Arts students must read BOTH of the following books AND complete the attached assignments. The assignments are designed to facilitate your understanding of the texts. Both assignments will be graded and must be turned in to your English 10 Honors teacher on the first day of class.


  • John Steinbeck East of Eden

Even 100 years ago, people were “California Dreamin’”—viewing the West as the quintessential land of opportunity. Steinbeck shows his readers not only “the dream,” but his take on “the reality” as well. This very readable novel is both a family saga and a modern retelling of the biblical story of Cain and Abel. Through the intertwined fates of two families, the Trasks and the Hamiltons, Steinbeck explores the mystery of identity and the inexplicability of love.


  • George Dawson and Richard Glaubman Life is So Good

George Dawson, a 103-year-old slave’s grandson who learned to read at age 98, reflects on his life and offers valuable lessons in living, and a fresh, firsthand view of America during the 20th century. His story inspires readers with the message that – through it all – has sustained him: “Life is so good. I do believe it’s getting better.”
CP and CCP Language Arts students must read the following book:


  • George Dawson and Richard Glaubman Life is So Good

George Dawson, a 103-year-old slave’s grandson who learned to read at age 98, reflects on his life and offers valuable lessons in living, and a fresh, firsthand view of America during the 20th century. His story inspires readers with the message that – through it all – has sustained him: “Life is so good. I do believe it’s getting better.”



 OTHER RECOMMENDED (OPTIONAL) READINGS


Reading for pleasure is a habit that has tremendous payoffs. Good readers generally have a better vocabulary, a better knowledge base, and better writing skills than those who rarely read for pleasure. The faculty and administration urge you to make time to read books that you enjoy. For your consideration, here are some recommendations for pleasure reading:
Sara Gruen Water for Elephants

An elderly man recalls memories of his early life, when he was suddenly orphaned and joined a traveling circus. Gruen humanizes the gritty characters of the circus, including an elephant named Rosie, in this romantic coming-of-age novel taking place during The Great Depression.


Steve Lopez The Soloist: A Lost Dream, an Unlikely Friendship, and the Redemptive Power of Music

This is a true story of the remarkable bond between a journalist and a homeless, classically trained musician.



Jeanette Walls The Glass Castle: A Memoir

In this memoir of her childhood, the author recounts her life with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity present her with major challenges.


Kuwana Haulsey Angel of Harlem

This novel is based on the true story of May Edward Chinn, who became the first female physician of Harlem. Weaving scenes from Civil War battlefields, where May’s father escaped from slavery, to Harlem kitchen tables, where May is sometimes forced to operate on her patients, this story provides a vivid portrait of a woman who changed the face of medicine.

Mark Salzman True Notebooks: A Writer’s Year at Juvenile Hall

The author chronicles his first year teaching at Central Juvenile Hall, a lockup for Los Angeles’s most violent teenage offenders, and examines what his students taught him about life.

­­­Dan Brown The Lost Symbol

A thriller with secrets, ancient rituals, and hidden symbols from the author of The Da Vinci Code.


Ken Silverstein The Radioactive Boy Scout: The Frightening True Story of a Whiz Kid and His Homemade Nuclear Reactor

This is the story of David Hahn, the Michigan teenager who built a nuclear breeder reactor in his backyard in 1994, endangering the residents of his Michigan hometown and raising the ire of the federal government.


H.G. Bissinger Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream

This is a true story of a Texas oil town’s high school football team, and how the Permian Panthers became more than a simple Friday night diversion.


Laura Hillenbrand Seabiscuit

Author Laura Hillenbrand brilliantly re-creates a universal underdog story, one that proves life is a horse race.


Dave Eggers What is the What?

Eggers tells the story of Valentino Achak Deng, who, along with thousands of other children – the so-called Lost Boys – was forced to leave his village in Sudan at the age of seven and travel by foot to safety in African refugee camps, and eventually, in America.


Alex Haley The Autobiography of Malcolm X

This book is the result of a unique collaboration between Malcolm X and Alex Haley, whose own search for his African past, inspired by an encounter with Malcolm X, led him to write the celebrated bestseller Roots. The book has since been adapted into a feature film by Spike Lee.

Jennifer Finney Boylan I’m Looking Through You – Growing Up Haunted: A Memoir

This memoir chronicles the author’s experience growing up in a haunted house on the Main Line in the Philadelphia suburbs, coming to terms with her identity as a transgender person, and making peace in troubling family relationships.

Aimee Bender The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake

On the eve of her ninth birthday, Rose Edelstein bites into her mother's homemade lemon-chocolate cake and discovers she has a magical gift: she can taste her mother’s emotions in the slice. To her horror, she finds that her cheerful mother tastes of despair. Soon, she’s privy to the secret knowledge that most families keep hidden.


John Steinbeck Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters

If you have wondered what the dedication in East of Eden means or what Steinbeck originally called the book, this is the place to find the answer. This book recounts the frustrations and musings of Steinbeck during the composition of East of Eden.




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