Sing Talk And Read star: a breakfast Club for You and Your Tot Sing Talk And Read star: Learning Parties for You and Your Tot



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Sing Talk And Read STAR: A Breakfast Club for You and Your Tot


Sing Talk And Read STAR: Learning Parties for You and Your Tot

Developed for DC Public Libraries

Fall 2009
Introduction

What are these programs?

The Breakfast Club/Learning Parties for You and Your Tot are designed to convey early literacy information parents/caregivers. Because many parents/caregivers are able to come only if their children come with them, the programs are designed to accommodate their children as well.


Each program has certain elements including:

  • One early literacy skill is highlighted at each of the six programs

  • Sharing of early literacy information

  • Sharing of research on the early literacy skill and/or child development

  • Demonstration of how book(s) highlight the skill

  • Nursery rhymes and songs, some with early literacy information modeled and explained

  • Opportunity for adults to share experiences around language development and sharing books with young children

  • Flannel board presented

  • Flannel board pieces for each participant to do continue at home

  • Board book giveaway each week

How are they different from storytimes?

Traditional storytimes include the modeling of early literacy skills but no articulation or explanation of them. An early literacy enhanced storytime includes 3 asides or tips during the course of the storytime which points out an early literacy skill. The storytime is child-centered.

The Breakfast Club/Learning Parties are adult-centered. The activities directed at the children are included to keep their attention. They also serve to demonstrate the skill being highlighted. Much more information is offered on the skills.

These programs incorporate time for parent-child book sharing during the course of the program and more discussion around sharing books with children.

Do I have to follow the script exactly?

No, you do not have to follow the script exactly. That said, the elements that make this program distinct from a storytime need to be included. If you decide not to do so, then your program should be publicized as a storytime.

This means, that the skill information, the research, the demonstration of ways to share a book and the opportunity for the adults to share/read books with their children and to ask questions about techniques to use must be included. You convey the information in your own words and you may change the order of the elements.

Sing Talk And Read STAR: A Breakfast Club for You and Your Tot

Sing Talk And Read STAR: Learning Parties for You and Your Tot

Week 4

Words, Words Everywhere

Print Awareness
Preparation



What You Need

Sign in list and pens

Giveaways noted below

Toys/items for children to play with as they come in

Tables/chairs/rug for room set-up

Nametags/markers

Flipchart stand

CD player

Crayon poster

Your Child’s Star flipchart of words

Our Child’s Star flipchart of words

Tomie’s Little Mother Goose illustrated by Tomie DePaola

Hickory Dickory Dock flipchart

I’m a Little Teapot flipchart


Little Boy Blue flipchart

Baby doll or stuffed animal to demonstrate with



Dear Zoo by Rod Campbell

Toddler Favorites CD

Mother Goose Rocks v.3 CD

Flannel Board

Copy for you of What I Do/What I Might See—Narrative Skills from Week 3

Additional book(s)/song(s) of your choice, if needed

Optional for Craft Activity:

Construction paper

Markers/crayons

Other materials for creativity



Giveaways/Handouts:

What I Do/What I Might See—Print Awareness

Book: Tomie’s Little Mother Goose (DePaola) in board book format

Flannel board pieces for Little Boy Blue

Velcro sticky dots for flannel board pieces
For those in attendance this week who did not attend previously:

Flannel board pocket folder


Program Note:

At the last session participants will receive a magnet photo frame that says “I am a STAR READER. At the last session, you may simply hand out the magnets and explain how to use them. Or, if you wish you can take photos of the adult reading together at any of the sessions, and have them ready to hand out at the last session.

NOTE: It is the ADULT who is the star. Please take the photo of the adult.

Details for the photos:

The magnet is rectangular (3.5” wide x 4.5” high) with a star that you can push out so that a star hole (about 3” from left to right point ) remains. The photo itself can be about 3” – 3.5” square. However, the area that shows through well is about the size of a 1.5” diameter circle.

See last page of this script for outline of actual sizes.

If




Sing Talk And Read STAR: A Breakfast Club for You and Your Tot

Sing Talk And Read STAR: Learning Parties for You and Your Tot

Week 4 Plan

Words, Words Everywhere

Print Awareness


Session Summary: What participants will learn

Information on these threads of learning is included in the script.
What is the skill and why is it important?

Print Awareness is knowing that print has meaning. It includes knowing how to handle a book, following the direction of print on a page, and noticing print all around us.

This skill helps children understand the importance of print and helps them become comfortable with books making it easier for them to concentrate on learning to read when the time comes.

What are some activities that help support this skill for the youngest children?



  • Allow child to try to turn pages of book

  • Babies explore books by chewing them

  • Point to pictures as you say the words or point to the real item to help children understand that pictures represent real things

  • Run your finger under the title of a book or under the words of a repeated phrase

  • When you read with your toddler, start the book from the back or upside down. When turning it the right way, say what you are doing.

  • Write notes to your toddler and read what you wrote.

  • Encourage your toddler to write and scribble. Talk about what you see.
  • Point out signs, ones with words and ones with logos. Read what they say as you point to the word.


Gathering Introduce yourself as people gather

  • Put out some toys so parents and children can play as they gather.

  • Families will sit on the floor but have some chairs available for those who need them

  • Go around introducing yourself

  • Offer nametags for adults and children





SEGMENT EXPLANATION


WHAT YOU SAY

Opening Song of your choice or

Your Child’s Star, to tune of Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

Use Your Child’s Star flipchart

Sing Version 1 first. When they join in, use Version 2.

AND/OR you can do the STAR clap:

Sing (clap) Talk (clap) And Read (2 quick claps)



Version 1

Twinkle twinkle all the stars

That is what you really are

We Sing Talk and Read together

We’ll enjoy our books forever

You are your child’s brightest star

That is what you really are.
Y

Version 2

Twinkle twinkle all the stars

That is what we really are

We Sing Talk and Read together

We’ll enjoy our books forever

We are our child’s brightest star

That is what we really are.

OU are your child’s first teacher. They learn from you, from watching you, by imitating you.


Introduction

[Depending on size of the group]

Welcome

Let’s all introduce ourselves and our children.



Review STAR Program

Use crayon poster of six skills to refer to as you mention that there are six skills.




Welcome everyone! My name is ____. I am the [position] here at [____ Library]. I am so happy to see you here today.

Let’s go around and introduce ourselves to each other. Please introduce your children as well.

Today is the third of six STAR Times. STAR stands for Sing Talk And Read. At each of the STAR Times, I’ll be talking about one of the six early literacy skills. We’ll talk about the research on how children develop and how it relates to later reading. You are already doing lots of things that support early literacy, which is what children know about reading and writing before they can actually read or write. It’s not about teaching children to read younger and younger. It’s about making sure they have a strong foundation in order to make learning to read easier once they get to school. We can start now!

Sing [clap] Talk [clap] And Read [clap, clap] [Repeat two more times, encouraging them to join in.]

In each session there will be books, songs and rhymes as well as something to take home related to the skill we’re talking about. The six skills are on this poster and today we are focusing on print awareness. I’ll talk about that more in a minute.


Week 3 Recap

Parent-to-Parent Sharing Time

Use What You Do/What You Might See Handout—Narrative Skills from Week 3


Those of you who were here last week, we talked about narrative skills, the expressive part of language which helps with understanding what they will later learn to read. Who would like to share some of the things you did last week that supported narrative skills? [Encourage discussion/idea sharing]




SEGMENT EXPLANATION


WHAT YOU SAY

Skill Information

Introduce skill

Point to crayon poster

Sing [clap] Talk [clap] And Read [clap, clap] [Repeat two more times, encouraging them to join in.]

Print Awareness is one of the six early literacy skills, knowing that print has meaning. It includes knowing how to handle a book, knowing the direction of print on a page, and seeing print all around us, called environmental print. It means giving your baby opportunities to learn about books even if they are biting or chewing on them. Babies have to explore with their mouths because their hands are not coordinated enough. When you gently pull the book from your baby’s mouth, you can give him a rattle or something else to chew on. Then talk about the pictures. If there’s a picture of an apple, you can show your baby a real apple and then the picture. First children will recognize that pictures represent real things. Later they will understand that words represent real things—all part of print awareness!

If you give your babies and toddlers opportunities to turn the pages of board books, you will find that they learn pretty quickly how to do it, even if it is clumsily at first. That’s how they learn, trying it over and over again, with your help.


Share a Book

Introduce and read the book 

Run your finger under the words for the title and author.

For each picture point to the words on the labels or signs of the containers holding the animals.



I’d like to share this book with you called Dear Zoo by Ron Campbell. It’s a flap book, which can be tricky to use with little hands. Sometimes the children tear the flaps because they don’t have good coordination yet. They do like flap books because they can play with the book and it’s also a kind of peek-a-boo.

I chose this book to share with you today because this simple story has signs, which goes right along with today’s skill, print awareness. One aspect of print awareness is noticing print all around us.

[After reading the book]

As you go around your day, point out signs to your children, even when children notice logos like gas station or fast food signs, this is the beginning of print awareness.


You may have noticed that I ran my finger under the words for the title and author of the book. You can do this with any book even if there are no signs in the book itself. It also works well, to run your finger under the words, when a book has a repeated phrase. Even doing something this simple when you read with your toddler is helping them to realize it is the words, the text, not the pictures, we are reading when we read.




SEGMENT EXPLANATION


WHAT YOU SAY

Rhyme: Hickory Dickory Dock

Use flipchart of rhyme.

Repeat the rhyme.

Demonstrate:

Use doll/stuffed animal to demonstrate for baby.

Can use your own body for toddler demonstration.


Now let’s do a rhyme together, Hickory Dickory Dock. This week we are adding on a fourth verse. Demonstrate for a baby using a doll. Then demonstrate for the toddler.
Hickory Dickory Dock

Hickory dickory dock

The mouse ran up the clock

The clock struck one

The mouse ran down

Hickory dickory dock.

H
For baby

Hold baby under arms and swing gently back and forth

Raise baby up

Lift baby high

Bring baby down

Hold baby under arms and swing gently back and forth



ickory dickory dock

The mouse ran up the clock

The clock struck two

And down he flew

Hickory dickory dock.


For toddler

Arm up, bent at elbow, arm side to side

Fingers from other hand walk up arm

Hold up one finger

Fingers walk down arm

Arm up, bent at elbow, arm side to side



Arm up, bent at elbow, arm side to side

Fingers from other hand walk up arm

Hold up two fingers

Flying motions with hand

Arm up, bent at elbow, arm side to side

H


Hold baby under arms and swing gently back and forth

Raise baby up

Lift baby high three times

Swing baby gently away from you

Hold baby under arms and swing gently back and forth

ickory dickory dock

The mouse ran up the clock

The clock struck three

The mouse did flee.

Hickory dickory dock.

Hickory dickory dock

The mouse ran up the clock

The clock struck four

He tapped the floor

Hickory dickory dock.

Hold baby under arms and swing gently back and forth

Raise baby up

Lift baby high two times

Bring baby down as if flying

Hold baby under arms and swing gently back and forth




Hold baby under arms and swing gently back and forth

Raise baby up

Lift baby high four times

Set baby on floor

Hold baby under arms and swing gently back and forth


Arm up, bent at elbow, arm side to side

Fingers from other hand walk up arm

Hold up four fingers

Tap the floor

Arm up, bent at elbow, arm side to side





SEGMENT EXPLANATION


WHAT YOU SAY

Song

I’m a Little Teapot from Toddler Favorites CD

Use flipchart of words

Demonstrate motions using doll/stuffed animal for baby actions, self for toddler actions

I’m a Little Teapot from Mother Goose Rocks v.3 CD

Repeat the rhyme using this music


I
For Baby

Bounce baby up and down

Swing to one side

Swing to the other side

Jiggle/bounce baby
Tip baby to one side

For Toddler

Stand up and bend knees, up and down

One hand on hip

One hand out to side

Wiggle, turn around if you like

Bend over to the side of the spout
thought we’d have some fun with the rhyme I’m A Little Teapot put to music. It’s fun to listen to the same rhyme put to different music. We’ll all stand up and do the motions to I’m a Little Teapot, first to the music from Toddler Favorites.
I’m a little teapot, short and stout

Here is my handle

Here is my spout

When I get all steamed up

Then I shout

Tip me over and pour me out.


Now we’ll do the same rhyme to the music from the Mother Goose Rocks CD

Flannel Board

Little Boy Blue

Use flipchart of words

Say rhyme using flannel board and these directions 


Repeat
Flannel Board Activity

Use boy figure and clothing

Talk about the clothing as you put it on. Talk informally about what the children are wearing to keep them interested. Those parents with babies can point to their babies’ shoes and head, too.


Our flannel board to day is the rhyme, Little Boy Blue.

Little Boy Blue

Come blow your horn

The sheep’s in the meadow

The cow’s in the corn

Where is the boy who looks after the sheep?

He’s under the haystack, fast asleep.

Will you wake him?

No, not I, for if I do

H


Before starting place haystack to one side

Put up standing boy

Put up horn

Put up sheep

Put up cow
Place sleeping boy near bottom of haystack

[Whisper this part]


e’s sure to cry.

I have here some clothes for Boy Blue. Let’s dress him. [Put up boy without clothing]

First we have his pants

Now we have his jacket

Here are his shoes—how many shoes does he have? Right! Two, one for his left foot and one for his right foot. Show me YOUR shoes. Good!

And on his head—show me YOUR head. Right! He has a hat!

And here is the horn he was blowing. He can hold it in his hand, or we can put it up to his mouth.

Helping children see that pictures represent real things later helps them understand that words also represent real things.



SEGMENT EXPLANATION

WHAT YOU SAY

STAR Read Together Time and Book Handout

Hand out Tomie’s Little Mother Goose to each family.



In all our STAR session we have been saying and singing lots of nursery rhymes. Today’s book for you is called Tomie’s Little Mother Goose illustrated by Tomie DePaola. It’s a collection of nursery rhymes, some of them common and some of them not so familiar. It does include Little Boy Blue, which we just did together. A book like this is easy to share because each page is a separate rhyme and you can read one or two rhymes without reading all of them at one sitting. Don’t forget to repeat the rhyme several times so that your child gets the rhythm. The more your toddler hears the rhyme the easier it will be for them to join in on some of the words.
The next five minutes or so is STAR Reading Time. Now it’s your turn to share some of the rhymes in Tomie’s Little Mother Goose with your child. As you read especially with your toddlers, point to the words in the title of the book and to the words in the title of the rhyme. When you look at the pictures in the book, you can make up your own little rhymes or songs too.

STAR Swap Time

Allow time for questions.


Discussion question:

Encourage discussion among the participants


OK, do any of you have any questions about print awareness or any of the things we have done today?

Now we come to our STAR Swap Time to share your ideas. You may have found that singing or saying rhymes with your child can be a comfort to them. Today’s discussion topic is: In what ways do you comfort your children? Children are so different in temperament and we ourselves have our own personalities, of course. What are some of the ways you have found work well to comfort your children?


Craft Activity (optional)

Have materials laid out

You can adapt your introduction to this craft according to what was said in the Swap Time


I thought it might be fun to do a craft today about ways you comfort your children. I have some construction paper, markers, crayons, and other materials here. You can write down things you say to your children or things you do to comfort your child.

Remember writing and encouraging your toddler to write or scribble is yet another way to help them realize that print has meaning. When you write them a note or make a list and tell them what you are doing, read it to them as you write it, you are helping them to make that connection between what we say and what is written.



Continued next page

SEGMENT EXPLANATION

WHAT YOU SAY

Handout: Flannel Board Folders

Hand out the flannel board folders and the flannel board piece handout. You can choose to handle this in several ways:

1. Hand out the sheet of Little Boy Blue. Hand out sticky back felt they can put on the backs of their pieces. Have participants cut out the animals and attach the felt at home.

2. Provide scissors in addition to the handout sheet of animals and the sticky back felt. Have participants make their pieces at the program.

3. Have volunteers precut and make the pieces ahead of time to be handed out at the program.
What You Might Do/What You Might See—Print Awareness Handout

Before you go, I am handing out these sheets of Little Boy Blue that we did on the flannel board. You can use these with your flannel board folder and add these to the animals you got before. You can do the rhyme together and also dress the figure.

You can use these in the car, while you wait at the doctor’s office, wherever you and your child go together.

I am also handing out this bookmark on print awareness and ways to keep it going at home. One side is more aimed at activities with babies and the other side with activities for toddlers. I’ll look forward to hearing what you are doing at next week’s program.



Preview Next Week

So, share books with your children every day. Next week we’ll be talking about letter knowledge and our book will be Color Zoo by Lois Ehlert.

Looking forward to seeing you next week.

Remember Sing [clap] Talk [clap] And Read [clap, clap] [Repeat two more times, encouraging them to join in.]

─STAR—YOU are your child’s star.



I am a STAR READER” Magnet Photo Frame




Area of photo that can be seen well.

1.5” diameter

circle

Approximate size of the star hole (3.4”wide x 3.25” high), but points are rounded.


STAR for You and Your Tot Week 4 Print Awareness: Words, Words Everywhere

Based on Every Child Ready to Read @ your library® of American Library Association; developed by Saroj Ghoting www.earlylit.net page





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