Source: unicef restrictions: none language: english



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STORY: HAITI / LONG TERM AID

TRT: 2:26

SOURCE: UNICEF

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12-21 JANUARY 2010, NEW YORK / PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI/ FILE
SHOTLIST:
12-21 JANUARY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
1. Wide shot, aerial view of quake damage

2. Med shot, injured on stretchers

3. Med shot, man holding injured baby on cot

4. Med shot, sheets covering bodies

5. Wide shot, back of UNICEF truck driving

6. Med shot, water bottles being distributed

7. Pan left, water distribution
FILE - SEPTEMBER 2008, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
8. Wide shot, family in Cite Soleil slum

9. Med shot, half naked girl in trash dump


FILE - SEPTEMBER 2008, GONAIVES, HAITI
10. Med shot, young women in shelter after flooding

11. Med shot, women washing clothes on streets

12. Med shot, girls in shelter
20 JANUARY, NEW YORK, USA
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Dan Seymour, UNICEF Chief of Gender and Rights: “ The issue is not an earthquake – it’s the intersection, the interaction, between the earthquake and the situation in Haiti, as a poor country with a very, very limited ability to provide for its children at the best of times and definitely to protect its children in times of duress.”
FILE - SEPTEMBER 2008, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
14. Close up, baby girl

15. Med shot, boys flying kite

FILE - SEPTEMBER 2008, GONAIVES, HAITI

16. Med shot, women in shelter after flooding
12-21 JANUARY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
17. Med shot, street scene after quake

18. Pan right, people climbing through collapsed house

19. Med shot, team of search and rescuers
20 JANUARY 2010, NEW YORK, USA
20. SOUNDBITE (English): Clarissa Brocklehurst, UNICEF Chief of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene:

“Unfortunately, Haiti did not have a particularly good sanitation situ. It’s one of the few countries in the world where sanitation coverage rate has actually declined over the past few years. Across the country the number of people who had access to what we would consider improved sanitation was only about 19%. So we’re already starting from a low base.”


12-21 JANUARY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI
21. Med shot, injured boy on cot

22. Med shot, injured girl sleeping

23. Med shot, aid worker checking sleeping child

24. Med shot, UNICEF worker with young survivor


20 JANUARY 2010, NEW YORK, USA
25. SOUNDBITE (English) Dan Seymour, UNICEF Chief of Gender and Rights: “It’s not just trying to make sure that there are better roads in place, because we’ll rebuild new roads that are better than the old roads, or new buildings that are more robust than the old buildings or new schools that work better or new hospitals that work better. It’s about fundamentally coming to a situation afterwards where Haiti, both its government and its people have the capacities to look after themselves.”

21 JANUARY 2010, SANTO DOMINGO, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

26. Close up, boy with bandaged head

27. Close up, child with injuries

28. Med shot, children evacuated from Haiti to DR

29. Close up, baby points to camera

30. Med shot, girl with UNICEF staff

STORYLINE:


The scale of need in Haiti today is difficult for many to conceive.
The injured need medicines, the survivors need shelter, the dead need burial grounds.
The global response has been swift and generous and relief is on the ground, but Haiti’s recovery depends on more than aid.
Poverty, political instability, weak governance, and corruption have long guaranteed that life for most Haitians is full of deprivations. Health care, education and even safe water were commodities in short supply even before the disaster.
SOUNDBITE (English) Dan Seymour, UNICEF Chief of Gender and Rights:

“ The issue is not an earthquake – it’s the intersection, the interaction, between the earthquake and the situation in Haiti, as a poor country with a very, very limited ability to provide for its children at the best of times and definitely to protect its children in times of duress.”


UNICEF has been in Haiti more than fifty years, working to provide for children who deserve more even in the best of times. The earthquake that killed so many is a double disaster, deepening the development constraints the country already faced and the difficulties of the emergency response, from security to sanitation,

SOUNDBITE (English) Clarissa Brocklehurst, UNICEF Chief of Water, “Sanitation and Hygiene: Unfortunately, Haiti did not have a particularly good sanitation situ. It’s one of the few countries in the world where sanitation coverage rate has actually declined over the past few years. Across the country the number of people who had access to what we would consider improved sanitation was only about 19%. So we’re already starting from a low base.”

Urgent support for the children at risk is still the top priority. But as the response moves from emergency to recovery, UNICEF’s goal is to see that rebuilding is not limited to physical construction,
SOUNDBITE (English) Dan Seymour, UNICEF Chief of Gender and Rights:

“It’s not just trying to make sure that there are better roads in place, because we’ll rebuild new roads that are better than the old roads, or new buildings that are more robust than the old buildings or new schools that work better or new hospitals that work better. It’s about fundamentally coming to a situation afterwards where Haiti, both its government and its people have the capacities to look after themselves.”


Life saving support, and care for these children will be needed for months to come.

The greater task of building a better foundation for Haiti’s future will take much longer, but it will be worth the effort.


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