Standards Alignment Guide: Grade 6 Reading Literature and Informational Text Reading Literature



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Standards Alignment Guide: Grade 6 Reading Literature and Informational Text

Reading Literature:

Key Ideas and Details

RL 1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Does the author include key details which can help a reader ask and answer questions?

  • Does the story have enough substance for students to draw inferences? For example, is a character developed enough? Also, a poem that is purely descriptive may not be appropriate for comprehension questions.



Questions to Ask Students:


  • Why was Jonathan able to finish the race first? How do you know? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?

  • What is so special about Mario? How do you know? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?

  • How did moving to New York change Juan’s career? How do you know? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?

  • Why did Tiesha try out for the play? How do you know? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?

  • Why did Tyrone get an “A” on his test? How do you know? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?

  • How is John different from Paul? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?




Students will be able to:

  • Make, test and revise predictions as they read
  • Make implied inferences about author’s decisions and literary elements in a text


  • Identify/cite appropriate text support for inferences about author’s decisions and literary elements in a text

  • Use the combination of explicitly stated information, background knowledge, and connections to the text to answer questions they have as they read

  • Make critical or analytical judgments to make generalizations

  • Create self-motivated interpretations of text that are adapted during and after reading




RL 2: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Is there a lesson or a central message worth identifying?

  • Does the character change which might lead a reader to identifying a theme?

  • Is the main conflict resolved?

Questions to Ask Students:


  • What is the theme of _____ (text title)? What details in the story/poem/drama help the reader determine this theme?

  • How does the author of _____ (text title) help the reader understand the theme of the story? What details from the story support your answer?

  • How does the author use the way Tyrone responds to his situation to develop the theme of the story?

  • Summarize the story/drama/poem without including personal opinions or judgments.




Students will be able to:

  • Describe or graphically represent the relationship between central ideas and supporting details.
  • Determine a theme or central idea of literary text(s)


  • Explain how particular details reveal a theme or convey the central idea

  • Summarize a text capturing the most important parts of the original piece

  • Summarize a text distinct from personal opinions or judgments

  • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments

RL 3: Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Is there a clear problem and resolution?

  • Does the plot include significant events to which the character responds or changes?

  • Is there a series of episodes/events leading to a resolution?


Questions to Ask Students:


  • What are the main events in the story/drama? How does each of these main events contribute to the development of the plot?

  • How did Karen and Mary respond to the crisis the family faced? How did their response contribute to its resolution? What specific details from the story/drama support your answer?

  • How does the main character change throughout the story/drama? What specific details from the story/drama support your answer?

Students will be able to:

  • Identify and describe the story elements in a literary work

  • Identify and describe elements of drama in a literary work

  • Identify, describe, and explain how the plot unfolds
  • Identify changes in setting


  • Identify character types and roles.

  • Describe character’s actions, traits, words, and motivations.

  • Explain how the characters interact to develop the story/drama

  • Describe and explain (tell, write, or graphically represent) how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes

  • Describe and explain how a character responds or changes as the plot moves toward a resolution



Craft and Structure

RL 4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. (See grade 6 Language standards 4-6 for additional expectations.)

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Are there words-worth-knowing where meanings can be determined from…

    • Context clues?

    • Greek/Latin roots and affixes?

    • Word relationships with antonyms and/or synonyms?




  • Does the author use figurative language and/or specific word choice to create a tone?

  • Does the connotative meaning of words develop a character or setting?



Questions to Ask Students:


  • What is the meaning of ______ in paragraph 2?
  • Which words help the reader understand the meaning of _____ in paragraph 5?


  • What is meant by the phrase, “As solid as the ground we stand on,” in paragraph 3?

  • What is meant by the phrase, “You are the sun in my sky,” in paragraph 1?

  • What is the effect of using the word _____ in paragraph 4?

  • What is the tone of the story? What word choices from the story support your answer?

  • How does the use of the phrase “barged in” rather than “entered the room” change the tone of the scene the author is creating?

  • How does the use of the word “scrawny” rather than “skinny” impact the image the author is creating of the character?

  • What does the author’s word choice reveal about his/her attitude towards his topic? Use examples from the text to support your answer.




Students will be able to:


  • Read and reread other sentences, paragraphs, and non-linguistic images (e.g., illustrations) in the text to identify context clues

  • Use context clues to help unlock the meaning of unknown words/phrases

  • Determine the appropriate definition of words that have more than one meaning

  • Differentiate between literal and non-literal meaning

  • Identify and interpret figurative language and literary devices

  • Explain how figurative language and literary devices enhance and extend meaning

  • Explain the impact of specific language choices by the author

  • Explain how authors use language

RL 5: Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Are there significant sentences, paragraphs, chapters, etc. that impact the text as a whole?

  • Are there critical places in a story or poem that serve to develop a theme, setting, or plot?

Questions to Ask Students:


  • How does chapter 4 contribute to the rising action of the novel? Use information from the novel to support your analysis.

  • How does the author use scene 2 to begin to develop the theme of the play? Use information from the scene to support your analysis.

  • How does the description in the first stanza establish the setting of the poem? Use information from the poem to support your analysis.

  • Analyze how chapter 3 contributes to the development of the theme/setting/plot of the book. Use information from the text to support your analysis.

  • Analyze how scene 1 contributes to the overall structure of the drama. Use information from the text to support your analysis.




Students will be able to:


  • Identify genre

  • Identify text features

  • Identify text structures

  • Identify text’s purpose and theme

  • Make predictions about text based on its text structures

  • Describe the connections between text structure and the text’s purpose and theme

  • Make connections between author’s choice of text structure and the text’s purpose and theme

  • Explain how structure enhances the text’s purpose and theme
  • Describe the relationship between text structure and development of ideas


  • Describe the relationship between form/structure and meaning in text

  • Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.



RL 6: Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • What stories are told in first person?

  • If told in the third person, is there a sense of a narrator relaying the events?

  • Does the character’s point of view influence the message of the story?



Questions to Ask Students:


  • Explain how Gary Paulsen develops the point of view of the narrator in ______ (text title). Use examples from the story in your explanation.

  • What is the most likely reason why the author decided to tell the story from Mike’s point of view? Is it effective? Why or why not? Use examples from the story in your explanation.

  • How does telling the story from Tonya’s point of view influence the story? Use examples from the story in your answer

Students will be able to:


  • Describe the author’s overall purpose for writing a text

  • Explain the differences between various points of view

  • Describe how point of view affects a literary text

  • Explain how chosen point of view helps the narrator or speaker develop the story to achieve the author’s purpose
  • Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text




Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

RL 7: Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see” and “hear” when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Does the text have a drama, visual, or oral version of itself?

  • NOTE: This standards refers to a presentation of text—not the audio CD.

Questions to Ask Students:


  • How is listening to an audiotape of “The Raven” by Edgar Allen Poe alike and different from reading the poem? Use specific examples from both versions in your answer.

  • How is watching the filmed version of Holes alike and different from reading the book? Use specific examples from both versions in your answer.

  • How is watching a performance of ____ (title of a play) alike and different from reading the play? Use specific examples in your explanation.

  • Which did you prefer, listening to the audiotape version of “The Raven” or reading the poem? Why?

  • Which did you prefer, watching the filmed version of Holes or reading the book? Why?

Students will be able to:

  • Describe the visualization that occurs when reading a text and explain how this contributes to understanding the story


  • Describe the visualization that occurs when listening to an audio version of a text

  • Explain how visualization , when reading or listening to a text, is different from viewing a video or live version of a text

  • Compare and contrast author’s choices in written text to the director’s choices in audio, video or live versions of the text

  • Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they "see" and "hear" when reading the text to

RL 8: (Not applicable to literature)


RL 9: Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.


Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Since this references thematic/topical ties (as opposed to asking students to identify a theme/lesson/message as is done in standard 2) do two selections written in different forms or genres (e.g., story and poem) serve to compare and contrast a topic or theme?




Questions to Ask Students:


  • How are ______ (text title) and _______ (text title) alike and different in their approach to the theme of friendship and loyalty? Which text is more effective in relaying this theme? Why? Use examples from both texts to support your answer. (Texts should be two texts from different genres or forms—a story and a poem; historical novel and fantasy story.)

  • How are ______ (text title) and _______(text title) alike and different in their approach to the topic of competition? Which text is more interesting? Why? Use examples from both texts to support your answer. (Texts should be two texts from different genres or forms—a story and a poem; historical novel and fantasy story.)






Students will be able to:


  • Identify criterion for which to compare two texts

  • Identify similarities between texts

  • Identify differences between texts

  • Identify the theme of a text

  • Compare the similarities/differences between themes from the same genre

Reading Informational Texts:

Key Ideas and Details

RI 1: Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Does the author include key details which can help a reader ask and answer questions?

  • Does the text have enough substance for students to draw inferences? (For example, students reading about geographical features need to infer how they affected the civilization.)




Questions to Ask Students:

  • Based on the information in ____ (text title), which car is best for a large family? How do you know? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?


  • Why are spiders more beneficial than harmful? Give specific examples from the article to support your answer.

  • Which step is most important in _____? How do you know? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?

  • Why is it important that birds fly south for the winter? How do you know? What is the textual evidence that supports your answer?




  • As a result of their work, what will most likely happen to the snow geese population? What is the textual evidence that

supports your answer?

  • How are insects and mammals alike and different? Give specific examples from the article to support your answer.

Students will be able to:


  • Make, test and revise predictions as they read

  • Make strongly implied inferences about content, concrete ideas and author’s decisions in a text

  • Identify/cite appropriate text support for inferences about content, concrete ideas and author’s decisions in a text

  • Use the combination of explicitly stated information, background knowledge, , and connections from the text to answer questions they have as they read

  • Make critical or analytical judgments to make generalizations

  • Create self-motivated interpretations of text that are adapted during and after reading

  • Draw conclusions about events in a text



  • Analyze what text says explicitly as well as inferentially and cite textual evidence to support that analysis

RI 2: Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Is there a prevailing central focus of the text?



Questions to Ask Students:


  • What is the central idea of ______ (text title)? How does the author convey that central idea? Use examples from the text in your answer.

  • Summarize the information in the article without including personal opinions or judgments.

Students will be able to:


  • Determine central/main idea of an informational text

  • Recognize how ideas are organized in an informational text

  • Describe or graphically represent the relationship between central/main ideas and details

  • Explain how the main ideas are supported by key details

  • Summarize the main ideas in an informational text, capturing the most important parts of the piece distinct from personal opinions or judgments

  • Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments

RI 3: Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Are there specific, identifiable techniques used for introducing, illustrating or elaborating an individual, event, or idea (e.g., starts with an analogy, continues with a definition and corresponding graphic/chart, describes the situation using common examples…)?


Questions to Ask Students:


  • How does the author help the reader understand what kind of person Harriet Tubman was? Use examples from the article in your analysis.

  • How does the author help the reader understand the role trade played in the development of the United States? Use examples from the article in your analysis.

  • Analyze how the author helps the reader understand how the idea of independence in America impacted the nations of

    Europe. Use examples from the article in your analysis.

  • How does the author introduce, illustrate, and elaborate his/her portrait of Rosa Parks? Use examples from the article in your analysis.

  • Analyze how the author introduces, illustrates, and elaborates his/her depiction of the Boston Tea Party so readers can understand the reasons behind it. Use examples from the article in your analysis.

Students will be able to:


  • Describe the events, key ideas/concepts, procedures, etc. in a variety of informational/technical texts

  • Identify the specific details/information that develop individuals, events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in informational and technical texts

  • Identify words/phrases that signal relationships and interactions between and among ideas, events, procedures, individuals

  • Describe how relationships and interactions between ideas/ concepts, individuals, and events develop informational/technical texts

  • Use text details to analyze how author’s development choices reveal the message (e.g., how author introduces, illustrates, elaborates information)



Craft and Structure


RI 4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings. (See grade 6 Language standards 4-6 for additional expectations.)

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Are there academic and/or domain-specific words where meanings can be determined from…

    • Context clues?

    • Greek/Latin roots and affixes?

    • Word relationships with antonyms and/or synonyms?

    • Appositions?

  • Are there words highlighted and defined within the text?

  • Are there graphics or text features to help define words and phrases?



Questions to Ask Students:


  • What does the word _____ mean in paragraph 2?

  • Which words help the reader understand the meaning of _____ in paragraph 5?

  • Which definition of ____ is used in paragraph 6?

  • What does the author’s word choice reveal about his/her attitude towards the topic? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

  • What does the phrase _____ (figurative language) mean in paragraph 3? How does the use of that phrase enhance the reader’s understanding of the text?

  • What is the connotation of ____ as it is used in the text? How does the use of that word enhance the reader’s understanding of the text? Use examples from the text to support your answer.



Students will be able to:



  • Read and reread other sentences, paragraphs, and non-linguistic images in the text to identify context clues

  • Use context clues to help unlock the meaning of unknown words/phrases

  • Determine the appropriate definition of words that have more than one meaning

  • Differentiate between literal and non-literal meaning

  • Identify and interpret figurative language

  • Explain how figurative language enhances and extends meaning

  • Explain the impact of specific language choices by the author

  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings

RI 5: Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas. a. Analyze the use of text features (e.g., graphics, headers, captions) in popular media.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Are there obvious text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, graphs, indexes, scientific models, electronic menus, icons, text boxes, table of contents, etc.) that provide clues for text structure?

  • Are there significant sentences, paragraphs, sections, etc. that impact the text as a whole? For example, in a paragraph is there a sentence that is clearly “doing” something such as providing evidence or defining a term in relationship to the paragraph as a whole.




Questions to Ask Students:


  • How does the cause/effect structure of the third chapter contribute to the development of the author’s central idea? Use examples from the text in your analysis.

  • How does the description in the fourth paragraph contribute to the development of the author’s key ideas? Use examples from the text in your analysis.

  • How does the use of chronological order in the first section help the reader understand the development of the author’s ideas? Use examples from the text in your analysis.




Students will be able to:


  • Identify text features

  • Identify text structures

  • Identify text’s purpose and central idea

  • Describe the connections between text features and the text’s purpose and theme

  • Make connections between author’s choice of text structure and the text’s purpose and central idea

  • Explain how structure and/or features enhance text’s purpose and central idea

  • Describe the relationship between text organization and development of ideas

  • Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas


RI 6: Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.

Should I use this text for this standard?

  • Is there a clear point of view and purpose for writing the text?

Questions to Ask Students:
  • What is the author’s viewpoint on evolution? How does the author convey his/her viewpoint in the text? Use examples from the text to support your answer.


  • What is the author’s purpose in this text? How do you know? Is he/she successful in achieving it? Why or why not? Use examples from the text to support your answer.




Students will be able to:

  • Describe the author’s overall purpose for writing a text

  • Identify the intended audience

  • Describe how the author addresses the needs of the audience

  • Identify the author’s viewpoint in a text

  • Describe how the author’s choices reflect his/her attitude, viewpoint, focus, or bias

  • Describe how the author’s choices shape the content

  • Explain how the purpose or point of view is conveyed in a text























Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

RI 7: Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Is there a visual representation of text?



Questions to Ask Students:


  • Using the information in the text and the diagram, explain how a person breathes.

  • Using the information in the article and the graph, explain the impact of the weather on crop production.

  • Using the information in the text and the time line, explain the development of transportation in the United States.

  • Using digital resources, collect information about life in the Sudan. Then, read a blog posting from a Peace Corps volunteer in that country. Share the understanding you have gained from your research about that country.

Students will be able to:


  • Distinguish between relevant vs. interesting or irrelevant information

  • Distinguish between reliable vs. unreliable resources

  • Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue

RI 8: Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Is there a clear claim stated? (Words such as “most significant” or “most influential” signal a claim being made.)

  • Does the author give specific reasons to support his/her points in a text?

  • Is there an unsupported claim?

Questions to Ask Students:


  • How does the author develop his argument about climate change? Is the argument effective? Why or why not? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

  • Which of the author’s claims about climate change are not supported by reasons and/or evidence? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

  • Which of the author’s claims about global warming are supported by reasons and/or evidence? Use examples from the text to support your answer.

Students will be able to:


  • Identify an author’s claim or point

  • Identify evidence presented by author

  • Explain author’s reasoning

  • Explain whether the evidence used by the author supports his/her claim or point

RI 9: Compare and contrast one author’s presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).

Should I use this text for this standard?


  • Do two or more texts on the same topic exist? For example, one could compare “His Majesty, Queen Hatshepsut” with her biography in the social studies text.


Questions to Ask Students:


  • How are the events depicted in ________ (a memoir) and ______ (a biography about the same person) alike and different? Use examples from the texts in your comparison.

  • Explain why the events depicted in ____ (a memoir) and ____ (a biography about the same person) are alike and different. Use examples from the texts in your comparison.
  • Which depiction of events do you think is more reliable, the one in ______ (a memoir) or ____ (a biography about the same person)? Why? Use examples from the texts in your comparison.





Students will be able to:


  • Identify the most important information and events from texts used for a given purpose

  • Use a method for managing and organizing selected information

  • Integrate information from texts on the same topic by different authors

  • Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another




Grade 6 Reading Standards Alignment Guide

(Source for some content: Delaware Department of Education)










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