Starters for sats geoff Barton



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STARTERS FOR SATS

Geoff Barton

FEBRUARY 2002

Aim:

The aim of these 10-minute starters is to build students’ skills in the various tasks they’ll encounter in the KS3 tests.


The advantage of doing this through starter activities is that students can build their skills systematically, actively and enjoyably.
The starters are grouped into themes:


  • Test format orientation

  • Spellings of high-frequency / problem words

  • Familiarisation with different text types

  • Writing practice

The materials were written at high-speed. See them as starting-points for your own work.


Ground-rules


  • Each starter is designed to last 10 minutes. Use it at the very start of the lesson, before you do the register, and keep the pace brisk. Don’t allow the task to run on for more than 10 minutes.




  • Don’t aim to link the starter to the main lesson activity. Instead, try to get continuity across starters – eg a week of “reading” starters, a week of “spelling” starters, and so on.




  • All of these are designed to require minimum preparation. It’s important, however, that you customise the materials to suit your own teaching style and class context.




  • Keep varying the groupings. It’s too easy just to keep students working in the same pairs or small groups. Put time into making sure there’s variety in the way students are organised. They’ll soon take this as the norm.




  • Although these are presented as off-the-peg activities, change them to suit your own teaching style and the temperament of your Year 9 class.



  • Keep the tone light and entertaining, but keep emphasising at the end of each activity what the students are learning: success reinforces success.


Enjoy!


Geoff Barton

Written for Suffolk LEA



May 29, 2018

STARTER SET A: Test orientation


These starters are designed to get students familiar with the requirements of the tests

Starter A1: Looking at Paper 1 (Copies needed for each pupil or pairs)

Opener – 2 mins

In X weeks’ time you’ll be sitting your KS3 tests

Working in pairs, look at last year’s paper 1. You’ll have 4 minutes, then I’m going to ask you some tricky questions to see how much you’ve learnt.
You’ll also have chance to ask me any questions about the tests.

Activity – 4 mins

In pairs looking at papers as fast as possible.


Then get them to close test booklets and turn them face down.
1 How long does the whole test last? – 1 hour 30 mins
2 How many sections are there? 3: Reading non-fiction A, Reading fiction B, Writing C
3 How long should you aim to spend on each section?

A – 30 mins

B – 20 mins

C – 35 mins


4 What different skills will you need to show?

Reading, writing, working under pressure, planning, etc



Closing sequence


Answer any quick Q&As
Put KS3 fact file on display

Tomorrow: paper 2

Starter A2: Looking at Paper 2 (Copies needed for each pupil or pairs)


Opener – 2 mins

In X weeks’ time you’ll be sitting your KS3 tests

Working in pairs, look at last year’s paper 2. You’ll have 4 minutes, then I’m going to ask you some tricky questions to see how much you’ve learnt.
You’ll also have chance to ask me any questions about the tests.

Activity – 4 mins

In pairs looking at papers as fast as possible.


Then get them to close test booklets and turn them face down.
1 How many Shakespeare plays do you need to know? 1
2 How many questions are there on our play? 2
3 How many questions do you have to answer - 1
4 How long is the test? – 1 hour, 15 mins

Closing sequence


Answer any quick Q&As
Put KS3 fact file on display

Tomorrow: paper 2

STARTER SET B: EXPLORING TEXT-TYPES
These starters are designed to get students familiar with responding quickly to different text-types. The idea is for them to encounter lots of short examples to build their confidence in responding to unseen texts

Starter B1 : Reading non-fiction [OHTs – B1 (a), (b), (c), (d), (e)]

Opener – 2 mins


Section 1 of KS3 test will give you a non-fiction text to read

What kinds of texts are non-fiction?

How are they different from fiction?

Let’s play GUESS THE TEXT TYPE. Students play in groups of 2 or 3.

I’ll show you 5 different opening paragraphs. You decide whether they are:

Fiction or non-fiction

What type of text (eg recipe book, instructions, etc)?

Discuss with your partner what the main clues are

Activity


Show the OHTs. Give students 30 secs to read and discuss each one

Closing sequence


Draw together the main clues to type of text – eg personal/impersonal style; formal/informal
Starter B2: Autobiography (OHT B2)

Opener


Paper 1 = non-fiction

Expect autobiography, letter, or diary

Look at this opening from an autobiography.

Activity


OHT

What can you tell about:



  • Writer

  • Where the text is set

  • What might happen next



Closing sequence


Discuss student responses
It was on a bright day of midwinter, in New York. The little girl who eventually became me, but as yet was neither me nor anybody else in particular, but merely a soft anonymous morsel of humanity – this little girl, who bore my name, was going for a walk with her father. The episode is literally the first thing I can remember about her, and therefore I date the birth of her humanity from that day.
Starter B3: travel writing (OHT B3)

Opener


In the KS3 tests the first section will probably be a non-fiction text – eg autobiography or travel writing

Look at this extract from travel writing …



Activity

Look at OHT

Students respond to questions, in pairs or small groups

They actively explore aspects of the style



Closing sequence


  • What do you think are the key features of travel writing?

  • How do you think it’s different from a travel brochure or autobiography?

  • Synthesise features

Urquhart castle is probably one of the most picturesquely situated castles in the Scottish Highlands. Located 16 miles south-west of Inverness, the castle, one of the largest in Scotland, overlooks much of Loch Ness. Visitors come to stroll through the ruins of the 13the-centyrut castle because Urquhart has earned the reputation of being one of the best spots for sighting Loch Ness’s most famous inhabitant.


American Travel Magazine
1 Which words tell you that this text is trying to persuade readers to go to the castle?

2 How would you rewrite it as a purely factual text?

3 What makes it seem like travel writing rather than autobiography?
Starter B4: fiction text-type (OHT B4)

Opener


Who can remember the format of paper 1 – what’s in each section?

Section B = response to fiction or poetry.

Question might ask about:


  • Characters

  • Style

  • Language

  • How writer build atmosphere or suspense

Practise here ..

Activity


Read extract on OHT

(There are ready-made questions on this)


Closing sequence

Jennifer stood, watching the steady drizzle underneath the awning in front of the station entrance. She waited for the cab to arrive with something that was not quite impatience: there was no real hurry, though she wanted to be with her father. It was just that the minutes were filled to bursting with an awful weight of the unavoidable fact, and if she had to spend them anywhere, she would rather it were not under an awning waiting for a cab.

Michael Marshal Smith, from Always

1 What do we learn about Jennifer from the extract?

2 What do we learn about the setting?

3 What do you think will happen next?

4 How much does this paragraph make you want to read on? How would you improve it?

STARTER SET C: WRITING PRACTICE
These starters build students’ confidence in writing in various styles. Writing is one of the main weaknesses in the tests – students forget about planning, structure, and paragraphing.

Starter C1: brainstorming for stories

Opener – 1 min


Look at this writing topic:

“Write the opening of a story set in a wild place”




Activity – 6 mins


Working in pairs, think how you would spend the first 5 minutes of the test getting ideas.

How would you think of



  • A place?

  • A character?

  • A storyline?

How would you organise your ideas?

Closing sequence





  • Look at brainstorming formats

  • Ask students to describe their different approaches

  • Eg spider diagrams … random jottings … lists of words

  • Get students to think which would suit them best in a 5-minute planning session at the start of section 3


Starter C2: Writing effective story openings (Part 1)

Opener – 1 min


Remember the story planning session yesterday. Today – look at what you think is a good story opening. Here’s the topic again:
“Write the opening of a story set in a wild place”

Activity – 4 mins

In pairs, write two opening sentences – one a really GOOD opening, the other a REALLY BAD ONE


Closing sequence





  • Listen to the bad ones from different students.

  • Make list on the board of what makes them unsuccessful (boring vocab, unexciting sentence structure, no sense of place, no suspense … etc)

  • Give everyone 30 secs to improve their good one in the light of these suggestions. Now listen to good ones and vote on which one in the class works best (ask student pair to type it up overnight to display on wall)



Starter C3: Writing effective story openings (Part 2)

Opener – 1 min


In KS3 tests you might be asked to write a story.

What did we say yesterday were key ingredients of good story openings?



Activity – 4 mins (See handout C3)


Now you’re the experts … working in pairs/small groups, look at this opening para and say how you would improve it. Think about:

  • Structure

  • Sentences

  • Words



Closing sequence


  • What have you changed?

  • How did you improve it?

  • Listen to different versions. Prize for best one

  • Summarise – key features of good story openings

Starter C4: Building suspense in stories

Opener – 2 mins

How do writers keep us reading?

Brainstorm ideas for building suspense

Focus on holding back information by using pronouns rather than nouns – eg

“She was standing there” instead of “The girl was standing in the large garden”


Activity – 5 mins


Take this opening of a fairy tale and use pronouns to build suspense:

“Once upon a time there was a little girl whose name was Little Red Riding Hood”



Closer





  • How have different people made suspense?

  • Read some out – eg “he was hiding behind the big tree” or “You didn’t see me there behind that tree, did you?”

  • Display the best

  • Summarise power of pronouns to build suspense

  • Keep list of pronouns on wall – he, she, they, I, you, him, her, we, it


Starter C5: Exploring dual narrative (OHT C5 a-f)

Opener


Q: How long is the average scene in EastEnders

A: less than 15 seconds

Think about how TV and film tells stories by cutting between storylines

How could you tell a story by having para about one storyline cutting to para about storyline 2?



Activity


Look at JAWS text

Guess what next para will be about and what will happen


Closing sequence


Discuss:

How different if the writer had simply focused on

a) the boy

b) the shark

instead of using dual narrative?

STARTER SET D: FOCUS ON SPELLING


These starters help build students’ confidence in fairly common spellings and spelling patterns. Short, lively, repeated activities are likely to have much more impact than occasional spelling tests. The games use lots of physical movement – standing up, getting onto floor, waving arms. You may want to modify this to “stand up” and “freeze” depending on your group!

Starter D1: common spelling errors – able / ible endings



Opener


The KS3 tests will assess your ability to read and write clearly and accurately.

Use these next few lessons to sort out spellings you sometimes get wrong




Activity


I’ll say a word. Then when I clap, stand up if you think it’s an ABLE ending.

Get onto the floor if you think it’s an IBLE ending


ABLE = stand / IBLE - Floor
Try 5 words from this word-list


  • Available

  • likeable

  • sociable

  • considerable

  • laughable

  • sensible

  • incredible

  • terrible

  • possible

  • responsible



Closing sequence


More practise tomorrow.

Starter D2: common spelling patterns 2

Opener


Quick recap on spelling patterns from yesterday – ible / -able endings

Today:


-ous endings – ‘c’ or ‘t’?


Activity


For C endings stand up, for T get on floor
ferocious

precious


vicious

delicious

cautious

ambitious



Closing sequence


How did you do?

Any tips for how to remember the more tricky words?


Starter D3: double consonants

Opener


Recap spellings from last two sessions – quick re-test for fun

Today – difficult combinations of consonants


Activity

If you think the word has two consonants together (double t, double ll, double cc or double r) hold up both arms. If just one, hold up one arm.




beginning

upsetting

forgotten

committee

permitted

occurred


visited

careful


developing

carefully

accommodation

Closing sequence

How did you do?


Starter D4: common homophones

Opener


What’s a homophone?

Give us an example (eg it’s / its, brake / break)




Activity

I’ll say some sentences containing homophones. You tell me whether it’s list A or list B.


Make up sentences – eg

“The pilot of the aircraft was really rather plain

“I was ill and lost all my strength for over a week”


A – stand up

B – under table

plain

Plane

weak

Week

steal

Steel

main

Mane

rows

Rows

fare

Fair

break

Brake

sew

So

whether

whether




Closing sequence

Which were easiest / hardest?


Starter D5: more homophone fun

Opener


What’s a homophone?

Give us an example (eg it’s / its, brake / break)




Activity

I’ll say some sentences containing homophones. You tell me whether it’s list A or list B.


Make up sentences – eg

The skateboard was ruined when one of its wheels fell off




A – stand up

B – under table

too

to

its

it’s

affect

effect

practice

practise

they’re

their

whether

whether



Closing sequence

Which were easiest / hardest?

OHT C3

Story openings

It was really cold. The weather was awful. I was walking along the edge of the cliff and I was really scared.

How would you improve this? Pay attention to :


  • Structure

  • Sentences

  • Words

JAWS: PARAGRAPH 1 (OHT C5-a)

In thirty-five feet of water, the great fish swam slowly, its tail waving just enough to maintain motion. It saw nothing, for the water was murky with motes of vegetation. The fish had been moving parallel to the shoreline. Now it turned, banking slightly, and followed the bottom gradually upward. The fish perceived more light in the water, but still it saw nothing.

JAWS: PARAGRAPH 2 (OHT C5-b)

The boy was resting, his arms dangling down, his feet and ankles dipping in and out of the water with each small swell. His head was turned towards shore, and he noticed that he had been carried out beyond what his mother would consider safe. He could see her lying on her towel, and the man and child playing in the wavewash. He was not afraid, for the water was calm and he wasn’t really very far from shore – only forty yards or so. But he wanted to get closer; otherwise his mother might sit up, spy him, and order him out of the water. He eased himself back a little bit so he could use his feet to help propel himself. He began to kick and paddle towards shore. His arms displaced water almost silently, but his kicking feet made erratic splashes and left swirls of bubbles in his wake.
JAWS: PARAGRAPH 3 (OHT C5-c)
The fish did not hear the sound, but rather registered the sharp and jerky impulses emitted by the kicks. They were signals, faint but true, and the fish locked on them, homing. It rose, slowly at first, then gaining speed as the signals grew stronger.
JAWS: PARAGRAPH 4 (OHT C5-d)
The boy stopped for a moment to rest. The signals ceased. The fish slowed, turning its head from side to side, trying to recover them. The boy lay perfectly still, and the fish passed beneath him, skimming the sandy bottom. Again it turned.
JAWS: PARAGRAPH 5 (OHT C5-e)

The boy resumed paddling. He kicked only every third or fourth stroke; kicking was more exertion than steady paddling. But the occasional kicks sent new signals to the fish. This time it needed to lock on them only an instant, for it was almost directly below the boy. The fish rose. Nearly vertical, it now saw the commotion on the surface. There was no conviction that what thrashed above was food, but food was not a concept of significance. The fish was impelled to attack: if what it swallowed was digestible, that was food; if not, it would later be regurgitated. The mouth opened, and with a final sweep of the sickle tail the fish struck.

JAWS: PARAGRAPH 6 (OHT C5-F)
The boy’s last – only – thought was that he had been punched in the stomach. The breath was driven from him in a sudden rush. He had no time to cry out, nor, had he had the time, would he have known what to cry, for he could not see the fish. The fish’s head drove the raft out of the water. The jaws smashed together, engulfing head, arms, shoulders, trunk, pelvis and most of the raft. Nearly half the fish had come clear of the water, and it slid forward and down in a belly flopping motion, grinding the mass of flesh and bone and rubber. The boy’s legs were severed at the hip, and they sank, spinning slowly to the bottom.

Peter Benchley




KS3 ENGLISH TEST

FACT FILE


1 How long does the whole test last?



  • 1 hour 30 mins

2 How many sections are there?



  • Three: Reading non-fiction A, Reading fiction B, Writing C

3 How long should you aim to spend on each section?



  • A – 30 mins

  • B – 20 mins

  • C – 35 mins

4 What different skills will you need to show?




  • Reading carefully

  • Writing accurately and clearly

  • Working under pressure

  • Planning



OHTB1-a

Freshly squeeze 2 oranges and pour the juice into a jug. Purée the flesh of 1 mango and pour into the jug with the orange juice. Whisk in 100ml natural yoghurt and a 15ml spoon honey, thoroughly. Pour into tall glasses over ice and serve.



  • Fiction or non-fiction?

  • What text-type is it (eg thriller, romance / autobiography, leaflet)

  • How can you tell?

OHT B1 –B

I contracted polio when I was two years old. I don’t remember it. But I do remember my parents telling me about the advice that the doctor gave when it was time to take me from the hospital. He told them, “Just put her in bed. She’s going to be staying there the rest of her life.”




  • Fiction or non-fiction?

  • What text-type is it (eg thriller, romance / autobiography, leaflet)

  • How can you tell?

OHT B1-C


Seville is voluptuous and evocative. It has to be seen, tasted and touched. The old quarter is Seville as it was and is. Walk in its narrow cobbled streets, with cascades of geraniums tumbling from balconies and the past shouts so loudly that one can almost glimpse dark-cloaked figures disappearing silently through carved portals.


  • Fiction or non-fiction?

  • What text-type is it (eg thriller, romance / autobiography, leaflet)

  • How can you tell?

OHT B1-D
Jake began to dial the number slowly as he had done every evening at six o’clock ever since his father had passed away. For the next fifteen minutes he settled back to listen to what his mother had done that day.


  • Fiction or non-fiction?

  • What text-type is it (eg thriller, romance / autobiography, leaflet)

  • How can you tell?

OHTB1-E

Proud mum in a million Natalie Brown hugged her beautiful baby daughter Casey yesterday and said: “She’s my double miracle.”




  • Fiction or non-fiction?
  • What text-type is it (eg thriller, romance / autobiography, leaflet)


  • How can you tell?

OHT B2


Autobiography starter
It was on a bright day of midwinter, in New York. The little girl who eventually became me, but as yet was neither me nor anybody else in particular, but merely a soft anonymous morsel of humanity – this little girl, who bore my name, was going for a walk with her father. The episode is literally the first thing I can remember about her, and therefore I date the birth of her humanity from that day.
What can you tell about:

  • The writer?

  • Where the text is set?

  • What might happen next?

OHTB4
Jennifer stood, watching the steady drizzle underneath the awning in front of the station entrance. She waited for the cab to arrive with something that was not quite impatience: there was no real hurry, though she wanted to be with her father. It was just that the minutes were filled to bursting with an awful weight of the unavoidable fact, and if she had to spend them anywhere, she would rather it were not under an awning waiting for a cab.

Michael Marshal Smith, from Always


1 What do we learn about Jennifer from the extract?

2 What do we learn about the setting?

3 What do you think will happen next?

4 How much does this paragraph make you want to read on? How would you improve it?


OHTB3
Urquhart castle is probably one of the most picturesquely situated castles in the Scottish Highlands. Located 16 miles south-west of Inverness, the castle, one of the largest in Scotland, overlooks much of Loch Ness. Visitors come to stroll through the ruins of the 13the-centyrut castle because Urquhart has earned the reputation of being one of the best spots for sighting Loch Ness’s most famous inhabitant.

Geoff Barton -- STARTERS FOR SATS --- page







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