Storyboarding



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Storyboarding

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What is Story Boarding?
Based on a written script or story, or direct from your own imagination, a storyboard is a series of simple pictures that depict in sequence, the scenes or events of your tale. It is a pictoral continuity of frames and should clearly and easily describe to the viewer the whole of the story. Storyboarding is valuable pre-production exercise in animation, advertising, video production, cartoons, and many other areas of visual media. Excellent storyboard artists are extremely valuable to the media industry.
Storyboards contain frames that when drawn with care can become valuable collectables. See examples below.
The storyboard becomes the blueprint for which the foundation of the film or project is constructed. But the storyboard is only a guideline, and plenty of room should be left for creative input from the director, animators, layout folks and/or videographers. In a "team" or studio production setting, always build your "blueprint" with lots of creative input.
Building Your Storyboard
For your own personal storytelling it is better not concern yourself with complications. Since it is your story, above all, keep your storyboard simple, and remember that all frames are there for the service of the story only. Cancel any scenes that do not further the story itself. That is why your storyboard template includes both graphic and written representation of the story.
Experience has shown in the traditional animation studio, that when animation stories evolve visually (through storyboard) the drawings themselves stimulate further ideas. it is therefore better to be open to allowing more "space" for creativity in your project. Scenes, characterizations, and action can be enriched in ways that production from just a script would not easily occur.
Methods

The whole idea behind storyboard frames is that they become a "visual shorthand" to allow you to explore ideas very quickly. To get your ideas out and down on paper as quickly as you envision them, requires minimum drawing time. This can be accomplished by using the "thumbnail" drawing technique.

From the smallest thumbnail sketches, a more elaborate storyboard can be designed from the initial ideas. Don't confine yourself, make your frames as large as you enjoy making them. If you would rather use storyboard cards instead, these can also be useful by placing the graphics on the front and the textual references on the back. Cards can be repositioned if scenes work better in a different order.
Standards:

EKS for this Unit

(1) Foundations. The student demonstrates knowledge and appropriate use of hardware components, software programs, and their connections. The student is expected to:

(I) distinguish between and use the components of animation software programs including cast, score, stage, and the animation control panel;

(J) select and connect task-appropriate peripherals such as a printer, CD-ROM, digital camera, scanner, or graphics tablet; and

(K) distinguish and use the different animation techniques of path and cell animation.


(5) Information acquisition. The student acquires electronic information in a variety of formats, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) use the Internet and retrieve information in electronic formats including text, audio, video, and graphics, citing the source;

(B) demonstrate the appropriate use of digital imaging, video integration, and sound in documents; and

(C) import sounds from a variety of sources including, but not limited to, audio CD, tape, and microphone.

(7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:

(A) combine graphics, images, and sound for foundation or enrichment curricular projects;

(B) integrate the productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunications, draw, paint, and utility programs into the digital graphics;

(C) use perspective including backgrounds, light, shades/shadows, and scale to capture a focal point and create depth;

(D) use the basic principles of proportion, balance, variety, emphasis, harmony, symmetry, and unity in type, color, size, line thickness, shape, and space;

(E) use repetition of color, shape, texture, spatial relationships, line thickness, and size to develop organization and strengthen the unity of a product;

(F) create three-dimensional effects using foreground, middle distance, and background images;

(G) apply a variety of color schemes to digital designs including

(7) Solving problems. The student uses appropriate computer-based productivity tools to create and modify solutions to problems. The student is expected to:

(B) integrate the productivity tools including, but not limited to, word processor, database, spreadsheet, telecommunications, draw, paint, and utility programs into the digital graphics;

(H) use the basic concepts of color and design theory to work in a bitmapped mode, creating backgrounds, characters, and other case members as needed for the animation;

(I) use the appropriate scripting language to create an animation or movie;

(J) read, use, and develop technical documentation;

(K) edit files using appropriate digital editing tools and established design principles including consistency, repetition, alignment, proximity, ratio of text to white space, image file size, color use, font size, type, and style; and

(L) use a variety of techniques to edit, manipulate, and change sound.
(9) Solving problems. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of work, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) create technology specifications for tasks and rubrics for the evaluation of products and product quality against established criteria;

(B) design and implement procedures to track trends, set timelines, and review/evaluate progress for continual improvement in process and product;

(C) evaluate data by using criteria appropriate for the purpose;

(11) Communication. The student delivers the product electronically in a variety of media, with appropriate supervision. The student is expected to:

(A) publish information in a variety of ways including, but not limited to, printed copy or monitor display; and

(B) publish information in saved files, Internet documents, CD-ROM discs, or video.
(12) Communication. The student uses technology applications to facilitate evaluation of communication, both process and product. The student is expected to:

(A) determine and employ technology specifications to evaluate projects for design, content delivery, purpose, and audience; and



(B) seek and respond to advice from peers in evaluating the product.




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