Storytelling Unit: 9a time: 1-2 days “The Sniper” leq

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Storytelling Unit: 9A Time: 1-2 days

The Sniper”
LEQ: How do authors develop plot, character, and setting?

How do readers use inference, foreshadowing, and irony to develop meaning?

How can experiences change people/characters?
KQ1: How do authors develop suspense?

KQ2: Why is the ending ironic?

KQ3: How could you characterize the sniper?
Objectives:

1. examine setting, characters, and action in the story to identify details which create suspense

2. recall main ideas of the story (begin to tie reading skills into literature)

3. characterize the sniper

4. Use reading skills discussed in class to ask questions, make inferences, clarify vocabulary, and summarize what they read.
Activating Strategy:

Word Splash- (see diagram for example).

Quick write: How do you think it would be to live in an area of the world where warfare is carried out on the streets daily? Students should share their answers in partners or small groups.

Teaching:

1. Read background from textbook. Show pictures from the Irish civil war and briefly go over what the war was about.

Key facts:

 *The Irish wanted their independence from Great Britain.

*After fighting with Great Britain, in 1922 Irish leaders sign a treaty with Britain.

*That treaty said that Ireland would be a “free state” meaning that it would have some independence but still be a part of (or territory of) Great Britain (like Canada). Most people were okay with this.

*Some people were angry over the treaty. They still wanted an independent republic. They were known as the Irish Republican Army (IRA)

*Those people who were pro-treaty and were okay with being a part of Britain were called the “Free Staters”.

*A civil war began between the two fighting Irish groups. The IRA didn’t gain much ground, so it began guerrilla warfare across Ireland.

*But by 1923-The war is over. The Pro-treaty Free Staters win. Though Ireland remained a part of Great Britain n 1923, by 1949 Ireland became a totally independent republic. The northern part of Ireland remained loyal to Great Britain.  

*The IRA remains in existence and even in the 2000s was responsible for bombings and fighting in Northern Ireland .

Also, show 4 min. YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEAuHTMUMeA&feature=related

2. Read “The Sniper” as a class. Since this is the first short story of the unit, the teacher will model reading strategies previously discussed as she reads. Students should follow along and mark their texts using post-its to ask questions and/or clarify action through summary for each page.

3. Complete reading quiz as a formative assessment and check comprehension. Compare answers with seat partner.

4. KQ1—clarify the meaning of suspense with students. Have students use a graphic organizer to find details of the story that create suspense using character, setting, and action. Students may work in partners.

5. KQ2—clarify the meaning of irony before answering.

Summarizer:

Ticket out the door:

1. Was there anything about this story that made it difficult to understand as we read it? (students may cite lack of background knowledge and setting)

2.What do you think was the best way the author developed suspense in the story? Why was this effective?



Homework: KQ3--Character Creature Assignment—Handout. Students create a creature based on their characterization of the sniper.

Storytelling Unit 9A” Time: 2-3 days


The Most Dangerous Game”
LEQs: How do authors develop plot, character, and setting?

How do readers use inference, foreshadowing, and irony to develop meaning?

How can experiences change a person?

How can we learn from the experiences of others?


KQs:

1. How is the world made up of “hunters” and “huntees” ?

2. How does the author inspire fear in the reader?

3. What conflicts does Rainsford have to overcome? What internal conflict is General Zaroff struggling with?

4. Which characters are dynamic? Static?

5. Is there a difference between killing and murder? What is it, if any? Is Rainsford a murderer?


Objectives:

1. identify three types of conflict.

2. predict the meaning of the title /ending

3. infer what happens to Rainsford at the end of the story

4. identify and examine static and dynamic characters

Activating Strategy:

“What characteristics does a person need to survive a natural disaster or accident?” The group may want to consider a situation such as a hurricane, plane crash, snowed in on the mountains, earthquake, stranded on an island, etc. Work in small groups or as a class.

Teaching:

1. Read background provided in the text. Students should preview the story and make predictions as a class. Tell the class they should pay particular attention to conflict within the text. Review the types of conflict.

2. Students will read the story individually marking the text with questions, confusion, and summarize each page using post-it notes.

3. Students will complete a selection quiz to check comprehension (formative).

4. Students should first work in small groups to answer the questions or confusion they had with the text. Then come together as a class to work out any last questions. KQ1and KQ2--discuss as a class. Go back and check the accuracy of predictions.

5. KQ3: With a partner, students should use a graphic organizer to mark the three different types of conflict in the text. Review as a class.

6. KQ4: Quick pair share

7. KQ5: Discuss and set up for extended thinking activity.


Extended thinking:

Students will write a paragraph using the TS+3D+CS formula and respond to one of the following:


1.In Richard Connell’s short story, “The Most Dangerous Game,” the hero of the story makes a drastic change by the end. Instead of reporting the psychotic killer, Zaroff, to the authorities, he takes his place as master of the island, as a hunter of men. OR ------
2. In Richard Connell’s short story, “The Most Dangerous Game,” the hero of the story makes a drastic change by the end. He gives up his lifelong love of hunting and never hunts again after experiencing the terror that animals feel while being hunted.

Summarizer:_3-2-1'>Summarizer: 3-2-1

Name 3 examples of conflict in the story

Name 2 ways the world is made of hunters and huntees

Name 1 dynamic character

Storytelling Unit 9A” Time: 1-2 days

The Necklace”
LEQs: How do authors develop plot, character, and setting?

How do readers use inference, foreshadowing, and irony to develop meaning?

How do author’s utilize different plot structures to a tell a story?

How can experiences change a person?

How can we learn from the experiences of others?
KQs:

1. What is the plot of the story?

2. How can a person’s obsession with status compromise happiness?

3. Does Mme Loisel really change by the end of the story? Is she a static or dynamic character?

4. How is the film version different from the story? How does visualization help someone understand the story in a different way?
Objectives:

1. identify the parts of plot

2. characterize Mme. Loisel

3. compare the short film and the story


Activating Strategy:

Students will complete an anticipation guide. Discuss answers as a class.

Teaching:

1. Read background in text-students may be unfamiliar with concept of dowry and immobility of social class in 1800s-early 1900s. In small groups, students should complete frayer diagrams for “status” and “social class.”

2. Students should preview and predict before reading.

3. Tell students to pay attention to the plot structure and pay particular attention to identifying the climax of the story.

4. Students will read the story and use post-its as needed.

5. KQ1: Students will complete the plot graphic organizer after reading

6. KQ2 and KQ3: discuss as a class.

7. View the 20 min. film version and have students fill out the graphic organizer as they watch. Examine 3 frames and what message the pictures convey. KQ4: How does visualization help someone understand the story in a different way?

Optional Activity:

Have students write a letter as either Madame or Monsieur Loisel. Write a business letter requesting that Mme. Forestier return the necklace or the money.

Students can take one of two angles:

1. a sympathetic tone (sob story)

2. A threatening tone (all the consequences if she does not comply).

After writing the letter, students can switch letters and reply to each other’s letter.


Summarizer:

“Move over Emeril”

Students will list the main “ingredients” of plot on an index card.

Storytelling Unit 9A” Time: 1-2 days


The Possibility of Evil”
LEQS: How do authors develop plot, character, and setting?

How do readers use inference, foreshadowing, and irony to develop meaning?


KQs:

1-How can you characterize Miss Strangeworth? How can you use inference to characterize Miss Strangeworth?

2- Does the author use foreshadowing to hint at Miss Strangeworth’s true character? If so, where?
Objectives:

1. characterize Miss Strangeworth

2. make inferences about characters

3. identify examples of foreshadowing
Activating Strategy:

How do you form an opinion of people you meet for the first time? Think about the first time you met a new friend. What traits or qualities caught your attention? Do you think now that your first impressions were accurate? Make a list of the traits, qualities, and behavior patterns that normally help you form an opinion about someone you meet for the first time. Discuss as a class.

Teaching:

1. Review how authors develop a character’s personality and traits through characterization.

2. Tell students to look for details that characterize Miss Strangeworth. The details do not have to be explicitly stated. Remind students that sometimes we can use inference to characterize someone.

3. Students will read “The Possibility of Evil” and use post-its to track questions, confusion, and summaries.

4. Students will complete a formative selection quiz to clarify their reading.

5. In pairs, students will use a graphic organizer to characterize Miss Strangeworth. KQ1.

6. KQ2: Where does the author use foreshadowing to show Miss Strangeworth’s true character?

7. Optional Activity: “Interview with Miss Strangeworth” –see handout.

Summarizing:

Two-Faced Sketch—Using what you know about characterization, how could you draw the two faces of Miss Strangeworth? Create a drawing that shows or symbolizes the two different aspects of her life and personality.

Storytelling 9A” Time: 1 day


The Princess and the Tin Box”
LEQs: How do authors develop plot, character, and setting?

How do readers use inference, foreshadowing, and irony to develop meaning?


KQs:

1.What is satire?

2. How is the end of the story ironic?

3. Why do you have expectations of a different ending? (go back to prior knowledge)


Objectives:

1. recognize satire

2. predict the ending

3. compare the typical characteristics of storytelling to the author’s


Activating:

The teacher will share two short stories from Grimm’s original fairy tales. How do they compare to how students normally think of fairy tales? What characteristics are typical of fairytales? Brainstorm as a class.


Teaching:

1. Define satire. Explain that the short story is written by an American humorist, James Thurber.

2. Read the story as a class (popcorn read?). Predict the ending.

3. KQ2: Discuss the end of the story.

4. KQ3: Did it meet students’ expectations? Why or why not?

5. If time, students can work in partners or small groups to rewrite the ending to meet “conventional” traits of fairy tales.

Summarizer:

Students should write a satirical thank you card from the Princess to the 5th prince, “thanking” him for his gift.



Homework: Study Guide for Storytelling Unit 1


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