Student sample



Download 11.36 Kb.
Date conversion01.05.2017
Size11.36 Kb.
STUDENT SAMPLE

 

            Even in Alice Walker’s short storyEveryday Use, politics did not seem to be a big part for the main character or in the book at all.  The main character, mama, lives by honoring her ancestors and without education.  Her oldest daughter, Wangero, became educated and eventually took part in the civil rights movement.  She was with a Black Muslim, and did not dress like a southerner, but more like a city woman.  Mama only lived by her ancestors not to the modern ways.  Wangero did not appreciate the fact that Mama kept living this way and angrily left.


            This shows that politics had not been a significant part in this story.  Walker shows that Mama lived like her ancestors and did not care about modern ideals, at the time the civil rights movement began to spark.  Her daughter, Wangero, appreciated those ideals and joined the movement but Walker depicts Wangero as a snotty, ill-mannered girl.  She does this to show that politics is not a huge part in her story.  Relating Walker to Hurston’s stories, they do not like to include politics in their writings.  They simply want to avoid putting it in.  This is why Hurston is not well known and did not further the civil rights movement.  Her books were not suited and well known.  She wrote to please, not to help with a movement.  Hurston avoided these political ideas.  Because of this, Hurston did not become known for helping the civil rights movement. 

 

 


REVISION SAMPLE:

 

           Even in Alice Walker’s short story “Everyday Use,” politics does not seem to be important to the main character.  Mama works hard, lives simply and honors her ancestors.  Her oldest daughter, Dee, became educated and eventually joins the civil rights movement.  When she comes for a visit, sporting an exotic dress and a new name, the differences between these two women becomes evident.  Walker assigns a political perspective to snotty, ill-mannered Dee. With no regard for Mama’s feelings, Dee explains she could no longer tolerate “being named after the people who oppress” her (116).  Baffled, Mama shares the family roots to Dee’s name. While the insensitive daughter harbors resentment for being given a slave owner’s name, Mama lovingly acknowledges family members who shared it.  Like Mama, Hurston claims in her autobiography “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” that she has “no great sorrow dammed up in [her] soul” (par. 6).  Walker’s main character mirrors Hurston’s desire to live life without wallowing in the burdens of the past. 


            Dee, on the other hand, wears her resentment like a crown and lords it over others. Without permission or explanation, she takes pictures of Mama and Maggie, reducing them to museum pieces, and tries to take possession of many household items, artifacts of their history and poverty.  The biggest conflict involves quilts promised to Maggie.  Dee complains that her sister “would probably be backward enough to put them to everyday use” (118).  Dee leaves in a huff because Mama refuses to deprive Maggie in honor of her oldest daughter’s greed.  The sympathetic characters, Mama and Maggie, have no political need or understanding and seem to be doing fine.  Walker created an unsympathetic character in Dee to show the disgrace of embracing a philosophy for the wrong reasons.  Instead of creating a story to enlighten the opposition, Walker exposes problems within.  If she can deliver a pertinent (though perhaps ill-favored) message, so can Hurston.

 

ANOTHER REVISION SAMPLE

            This November, Alice Walker will be a featured speaker at the Center for the Education of Women (CEW) in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  Walker, a Pulitzer Prize winner of much acclaim, most notably perhaps for The Color Purple, has published many poems, children’s books and short stories.  This gifted author’s topic will be Hurston, the “most prolific African-American woman writer of her time, who brought to life the power, richness and complexity of black cultures” (umich.edu).  Walker could hardly fault Hurston for her lack of political advocacy since Walker criticizes the same in her short story “Everyday Use.”  The main character, Mama, and the youngest daughter, Maggie, have prepared their ramshackle home for a visit from the oldest daughter.  Surprisingly, Dee arrives wearing an exotic dress, armed with a camera and a new name, accompanied by a man who imposes unwelcomed hugs on poor Maggie.  Walker assigns a political perspective to snotty, ill-mannered Dee.  With no regard for Mama’s feelings, Dee explains she could no longer tolerate “being named after the people who oppress” her (116).  Baffled, Mama clarifies the family roots to Dee’s name.  While the insensitive daughter harbors resentment for being given a slave owner’s name, Mama lovingly acknowledges family members who shared it.  Like Mama, Hurston claims in her autobiography “How It Feels to Be Colored Me,” that she has “no great sorrow dammed up in [her] soul” (par. 6).  Walker’s main character mirrors Hurston’s desire to live life without wallowing in the burdens of the past. 

            Dee, on the other hand, wears her resentment like a crown and lords it over others. Without permission or explanation, Dee takes pictures of Mama and Maggie, reducing them to museum pieces, and tries to take possession of many household items, artifacts of their history and poverty.  The biggest conflict involves quilts promised to Maggie.  Dee complains that her sister “would probably be backward enough to put them to everyday use” (118).  Dee leaves in a huff because Mama refuses to deprive Maggie in honor of her oldest daughter’s greed.  The sympathetic characters, Mama and Maggie, have no political need or understanding and seem to be doing fine.  Walker created an unsympathetic character in Dee to show the disgrace of embracing a philosophy for the wrong reasons.  Instead of creating a story to enlighten the opposition, Walker exposes problems within. 
            Because Walker calls into question the misbehaviors of some people involved in the civil rights movement, she would likely support Hurston doing the same in Eyes.  Hurston takes on her detractors by highlighting a flaw within the African-American community.  Her nod to politics begins with an oblivious Janey, who only remembers that Booker T. Washington “wuz a great big man” (140).  Hurston’s reference to an incredibly famous African-American leader illustrates Janey’s extreme ignorance.  Still, beloved Janey seems fine without politics; she finally has a rich, full life.  Hurston also created Mrs. Turner, an African-American with European features, who tries to coax Janey into leaving her husband for Turner’s brother.  She considers Janey too good to associate with darker Blacks.  Turner’s desire to “lighten up de race” points to the problem of internal racism (140).  If Walker can deliver a pertinent (though perhaps ill-favored) message, so can Hurston.

 

http://www.cew.umich.edu/progevents/alice-walker-presented-department-afroamerican-and-african-studies-and-center-education-w



 




The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page