Subject Title : Foundation Biology



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Subject Title: Foundation Biology

Subject Code: ABCT 102

Credit Value: 3

Responsible staff and department: Dr. Johnny C.O. Tang

Department of Applied Biology & Chemical Technology



Pre-requisite: NIL
Learning Activities:
Lecture 32

Tutorial 12

––––––––

Total 44 hours



Assessment:
Continuous Assessment 50%

Examination 50%

––––––––

Total 100%



Aims:
The lectures aim to explain and discuss the knowledge of biology at foundation level which is essential to proceed to higher level of study in biology-related disciplines.

Learning Outcomes:
After successful completion of this subject, students should be able to appreciate the basic features and integrative nature of different biological components for survival.

Syllabus:


INDICATIVE CONTENT

TUITION

Cells:

Structure and function of the cell

Biomolecules

Homeostasis and transport within the cell

Photosynthesis and cellular respiration

Cell reproduction - mitosis and meiosis


8 hours

Genetics:

Fundamentals of genetics

Nucleic acids and protein synthesis

Inheritance patterns

DNA technology


6 hours

Body Functions:

Organization of human tissues, organs and systems

Overview of physiological functions:

Nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, digestive system, renal system, immune system, endocrine and reproductive systems




20 hours

Microorganisms:

Bacteria and viruses

Protozoa

Algae and fungi




7 hours

Ecology:

Introduction to ecology and populations

Ecosystems and the biosphere


3 hours



Textbooks and Reference books:


Eldon E., Frederick C. and David B.

Concepts in Biology (11th Edition)

Mc Graw Hill, 2005










Freeman S.


Biological science (2nd Edition)

Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005



Subject Title: Fundamental Chemistry

Subject Code: ABCT103

Credit Value: 3

Responsible Staff and Department: Dr. C.H. Yeung

Department of Applied Biology & Chemical Technology

Pre-requisite: Nil
Learning Activities:
Lecture 36

Tutorial 6

––––––––

Total 42 hours

The students are also expected to spend about 80 hours for self-study

Teaching and Learning Approach:

Lectures will provide students with general outlines of key concepts and guidance on further reading. Lectures will be further consolidated through assignments and tutorials.


Students will be assessed by assignments, quizzes as well as an end-of-term written examination.

Assessment:
Continuous Assessment 60%

Examination 40%

––––––––

Total 100%

To pass the subject, students must obtain a grade D or above in both the Continuous Assessment and the Examination.

Aims:

This subject educates student with fundamental knowledge in chemistry. It is also a bridging course for students previously learning chemistry in a language other than English.

The subject has the following objectives:


  1. to provide student with a broad fundamental knowledge in chemistry required for the study of science, technology, engineering or related programme.

  2. to help student study chemistry effectively in an English-medium learning environment and to acquaint student with the necessary chemical vocabularies.



Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students will be able to:



  1. Understand the fundamental principles of chemistry;

  2. Have sufficient chemical knowledge for their chosen field of study.
  3. Understand and appreciate the chemical terms and principles that they may encounter in written and oral communication.




Syllabus:


INDICATIVE CONTENT

TUITION

Atomic structure

Electromagnetic radiation, hydrogen spectrum, energy levels, electron spin, quantum numbers, dual properties of matter, wave function and probability, uncertainty principle, charge clouds of s, p, d and f orbits, radial distribution curves, electronic configurations of many-electron atoms, Pauli exclusion principle, Aufbau principle, ionization energy, electron affinity, electronegativity, atomic and ionic radii and periodicity.



10 hours

Chemical bonding

Ionic bonds, covalent bonds, dative bonds, metallic bonds, van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonds, concepts of valance bond theory, resonance, molecular shapes by VSEPR method for main group elements,



6 hours

Properties of gas, liquid and solid

Gases: gas laws, ideal gas equation, Dalton’s law of partial pressures, kinetic molecular theory of gases, collision frequency, gas diffusion.

Liquids: viscosity, refractive index, surface tension, vapour pressure and variation of vapour pressure with composition of mixture.

Solids: amorphous solids, types of crystals, unit cell, co-ordination number.



6 hours

General inorganic chemistry

Main group elements and their compounds. Transition metals and their complexes: catalytic activity associated with ligands .Co-ordination numbers of metal complexes.

10 hours


General organic chemistry

Simple concept of orbital hybridisation of carbon: sp, sp2 and sp3. Naming of compounds containing carbon chains and rings. Isomerism, regioisomer and optical isomer. A preliminary study of the functional group: alkane, alkene, alcohol, aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic acid, ester. Direct and simple functional group transformations.



10 hours


Textbooks and Reference books:
Essential

Chang R.

Chemistry, 7th ed.

McGraw-Hill 2002

Subject Title: Foundation Mathematics for Business

Subject Code: AMA102

Credit Value: 3

Pre-requisite: Nil

Learning Activities:
Lecture 28

Tutorial and Student Presentation 14

––––––––

Total 42 hours


The lectures aim to provide the students with an integrated knowledge required for the understanding and application of mathematical concepts and techniques. To develop students’ ability for logical thinking and effective communication, tutorial and presentation sessions will be held.

Assessment:
Continuous Assessment 40%

Examination 60%

––––––––

Total 100%

To ensure that students learn and reflect continuously, Continuous Assessment is an important element and students are required to obtain Grade D or above in both the Continuous Assessment and the Examination components. The continuous assessment comprises of assignments, in-class quizzes and tests. The assignments are used to assist the students to reflect and review on their progress. The end-of-semester examination is used to assess the knowledge acquired by the students and their ability to apply and extend such knowledge.


Learning Outcomes:
This is a bridging subject to provide the students with a broad foundation in Mathematics. It aims to prepare the students to study an undergraduate programme in a business related discipline. The emphasis will be on the application of mathematical methods to solving basic mathematical problems.
Upon satisfactory completion of the subject, students are expected to be able to:


  1. apply mathematical reasoning to analyse essential features of different mathematical problems such as differentiation and basic probability;

  2. extend their knowledge of mathematical techniques and adapt known solutions to different situations;

  3. search for useful information and use statistical tables in solving basic statistical problems;

  4. undertake continuous learning.



Syllabus:
Functions:

Basic concepts; Mathematical induction; Functions and inverse functions; Elementary functions.


Complex Number:

Trigonometric Equations; Algebra; Geometry; Roots.


Calculus:

Limits; Continuity; Derivatives Techniques of differentiation; Higher derivatives; Maxima and minima; Curve sketching.


Linear Algebra:

Matrices and determinants; Systems of linear equations.


Probability and Statistics:

Descriptive statistics; Frequency distribution; Mean, median and mode; Variance and standard deviation; Probability theory; Discrete and continuous random variables; Normal distribution; Sampling; Hypotheses testing and estimations.



Textbooks and Reference books:

Department of Foundation Mathematics The Hong Kong

Applied Mathematics 3rd edition Polytechnic

University, 2004

L. Bostock & Core Mathematics for A-Level Stanley Thornes

S. Chandler 3rd edition 2000


R.E. Walpole & Probability and Statistics for Engineers Prentice Hall

R.H. Myers and Scientists 2002

S.L. Myers & 7th edition

K.Y. Ye


Subject Title: Foundation Mathematics I for Science and Engineering

Subject Code: AMA103

Credit Value: 3

Pre-requisite: Nil

Learning Activities:
Lecture 28

Tutorial and Student Presentation 14

––––––––

Total 42 hours


The lectures aim to provide the students with an integrated knowledge required for the understanding and application of mathematical concepts and techniques. To develop students’ ability for logical thinking and effective communication, tutorial and presentation sessions will be held.

Assessment:
Continuous Assessment 40%

Examination 60%

––––––––

Total 100%


To ensure that students learn and reflect continuously, Continuous Assessment is an important element and students are required to obtain Grade D or above in both the Continuous Assessment and the Examination components. The continuous assessment comprises of assignments, in-class quizzes and tests. The assignments are used to assist the students to reflect and review on their progress. The end-of-semester examination is used to assess the knowledge acquired by the students and their ability to apply and extend such knowledge.

Learning Outcomes:

This is a bridging subject to provide the students with a broad foundation in Mathematics. It aims to prepare the students for studying an undergraduate programme in Engineering or Science. The emphasis will be on application of mathematical methods to solving basic mathematical problems.
Upon satisfactory completion of the subject, students are expected to be able to:


  1. apply mathematical reasoning to analyse essential features of different mathematical problems such as mathematical induction;

  2. extend their knowledge of elementary functions and systems of equations to solve simple mathematical problems;

  3. appreciate the concept of complex numbers so as to apply to science and engineering problems;

  4. undertake continuous learning.



Syllabus:
Functions:

Basic concepts; Mathematical induction; Functions and inverse functions; Elementary functions.


Complex Number:

Trigonometric Equations; Algebra; Geometry; De Moivre’s Theorem; Roots.


Linear Algebra:

Matrices and determinants; Systems of linear equations.



Textbooks and Reference books:
D. Varberg, E.J. Purcell Calculus Prentice Hall

& S.E. Rigdon 8th edition 2000


Department of Foundation Mathematics The Hong Kong

Applied Mathematics 2nd edition Polytechnic

University

2004
L. Bostock & Core Mathematics for A-Level Stanley Thornes

S. Chandler 3rd edition 2000
F.R. Giordano, Calculus for Engineers and Scientists, Addison-Wesley

M.D. Weir & 1988

R.L. Finney

Subject Title: Foundation Mathematics II for Science and Engineering


Subject Code: AMA104

Credit Value: 3

Pre-requisite: AMA103 Foundation Mathematics I for Science and Engineering

Learning Activities:
Lecture 28

Tutorial and Student Presentation 14

––––––––

Total 42 hours


The lectures aim to provide the students with an integrated knowledge required for the understanding and application of mathematical concepts and techniques. To develop students’ ability for logical thinking and effective communication, tutorial and presentation sessions will be held.

Assessment:
Continuous Assessment 40%

Examination 60%

––––––––

Total 100%


To ensure that students learn and reflect continuously, Continuous Assessment is an important element and students are required to obtain Grade D or above in both the Continuous Assessment and the Examination components. The continuous assessment comprises of assignments, in-class quizzes and tests. The assignments are used to assist the students to reflect and review on their progress. The end-of-semester examination is used to assess the knowledge acquired by the students and their ability to apply and extend such knowledge.

Learning Outcomes:
This is a bridging subject to provide the students with a broad foundation in Mathematics. It aims to prepare the students for studying an undergraduate programme in Engineering or Science. The emphasis will be on application of mathematical methods to solving basic mathematical problems.
Upon satisfactory completion of the subject, students are expected to be able to:

  1. apply mathematical reasoning to analyse essential features of different mathematical problems such as differentiation and integration;


  2. extend their knowledge of mathematical techniques and adapt known solutions to different situations;

  3. apply appropriate mathematical techniques to model and solve problems in science and engineering;

  4. search for useful information and use statistical tables in solving basic statistical problems;

  5. undertake continuous learning.



Syllabus:
Differential Calculus:

Limits and continuity; Derivatives; Techniques of differentiation; Higher derivatives; Maxima and minima; Curve sketching.


Integral Calculus:

Definite and indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; Techniques of integration; Geometric and physical applications.


Probability and Statistics:

Descriptive statistics; Frequency distribution; Mean, median and mode; Variance and standard deviation; Probability theory; Discrete and continuous random variables; Normal distribution.



Textbooks and Reference books:
D. Varberg, E.J. Purcell Calculus Prentice Hall

& S.E. Rigdon 8th edition 2000


L. Bostock & Core Mathematics for A-Level Stanley Thornes

S. Chandler 3rd edition 2000


F.R. Giordano, Calculus for Engineers and Scientists Addison-Wesley

M.D. Weir & 1988

R.L. Finney
R.E. Walpole & Probability and Statistics for Engineers Prentice Hall

R.H. Myers and Scientists 2002

S.L. Myers & 7th edition

K.Y. Ye
Subject Title: College Physics I

Subject Code: AP101

Credit Value: 3

Pre-requisite: Nil
Learning Activities:
Lecture 28

Laboratory 9

Tutorial and Student Presentation 5

––––––––


Total 42 hours
The lectures aim to provide the students with an integrated knowledge required for the understanding and application of Foundation Physics.

Assessment:
Continuous Assessment 40%

Examination 60%

––––––––

Total 100%



Learning Outcomes:
On completing the subject, students will be able to:

  1. solve simple problems in mechanics using vector method;

  2. apply Archimedes’ principle to solve problems in hydrostatics;

  3. use Doppler’s effect to explain changes in frequency received;

  4. apply simple laws in optics to explain image formation;

  5. explain ideal gas laws in terms of kinetic theory;

  6. apply the first law of thermodynamics to simple processes;

  7. define electrostatic field and potential;

  8. solve problems on interaction between current and magnetic field;

  9. apply electromagnetic induction to various phenomena; and

  10. describe simple models of the atom and the nucleus.



Syllabus:

  1. Mechanics: Vectors; Rectilinear motion with uniform acceleration; Projectile; Newton's laws of motion; Motion under constant force; Momentum, work, energy. Collisions; Hydrostatics and Archimedes' principle.


  2. Wave: Longitudinal and transverse waves and equation of traveling wave in 1-D; Doppler effect; Image formation in lenses and mirrors; Microscope and telescope.

  3. Thermal physics: Conduction, convection and radiation; Ideal gas and kinetic theory. Work, heat and internal energy; First law of thermodynamics applied to different processes.

  4. Electromagnetism: Coulomb's law; Electrostatic field and potential difference; Parallel-plate capacitor and the effect of dielectrics; Magnetic force on moving charge and current; Hall effect; Faraday's law of induction; Lenz's law; Inductors.

  5. Modern Physics: Photons and photoelectric effect; Simple model of the atom and the nucleus; Radioactivity; Nuclear fission and fusion.



Textbooks and Reference books:
Giancoli, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 2000, Prentice Hall
Physics CAI in CD-ROM, 2000, USTC
Computer Simulation System for College Physics Experiment, Version 2.0 for Windows, 2000, USTC
Halliday, Resnick and Walker, Fundamentals of Physics with CD-ROM, 6th edition, 2000, Wiley
Subject Title: College Physics II

Subject Code: AP102

Credit Value: 3

Pre-requisite: AP101 College Physics I
Learning Activities:
Lecture 28

Laboratory 9

Tutorial and Student Presentation 5

––––––––

Total 42 hours

The lectures aim to provide the students with an integrated knowledge required for the understanding and application of Foundation Physics

Assessment:
Continuous Assessment 40%

Examination 60%

––––––––

Total 100%



Learning Outcomes:
On completing the subject, students will be able to:

  1. solve problems on rotation of rigid body about fixed axis;

  2. define simple harmonic motion and solve simple problems;

  3. apply Bernoulli’s equation to simple problems in fluid flow;

  4. explain phenomena related to the wave character of light;

  5. solve simple problems related to the Carnot cycle;

  6. use Gauss’ law in solving problems in electrostatics;

  7. determine the magnetic field due to simple current distribution; and

  8. use the Bohr model to explain the hydrogen spectrum.



Syllabus:


  1. Mechanics: Rectilinear motion under variable force; Circular motion; Newton's law of universal gravitational; Gravitational potential energy; Rotation of rigid body about a fixed axis; Simple harmonic motion; Fluid flow and Bernoulli's equation.

  2. Wave motion: Huygen's principle; Interference and diffraction; Polarization.

  3. Thermal physics: Further examples in the first law of thermodynamics; Entropy and the second law of thermodynamics; Carnot cycle.

  4. Electromagnetism: Gauss' law; Electrostatic field and potential due to charge distribution; Various types of capacitors; Biot-Savart law and Ampere's law; Types of magnetic materials.

  5. Modern physics: The Bohr model and the hydrogen spectrum; Law of radioactive decay; Equivalence of mass and energy; Nuclear power.

Textbooks and Reference books:
Giancoli, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 2000, Prentice Hall
Physics CAI in CD-ROM, 2000, USTC
Computer Simulation System for College Physics Experiment, Version 2.0 for Windows, 2000, USTC
Halliday, Resnick and Walker, Fundamentals of Physics with CD-ROM, 6th edition, 2000, Wiley
Subject Title: Introduction to Hong Kong

Subject Code: APSS182

Credit Value: 3

Pre-requisite: Nil
Learning Activities:
Lecture (with outings) 28

Tutorial and Student Presentation 14

––––––––

Total 42 hours


Students would participate in six outings by which they are introduced to, on the one hand, the historic sites that could exhibit the traditional social lives of Hong Kong people and on the other the modern landscapes of Hong Kong.
The lectures aim to provide the students with an integrated knowledge required for the understanding and application of sociological concepts to understand the social and cultural development of Hong Kong;

Assessment:
Continuous Assessment 100%

50% term paper

50% presentation

Examination 0%

––––––––

Total 100%



Learning Outcomes:
Students are able to

  1. describe the historical development of the pre-1841 Hong Kong;
  2. understand the social life of the pre-1841 Hong Kong;


  3. depict the historical trajectory of the colonial Hong Kong;

  4. analyze the social, cultural and political aspect of the colonial Hong Kong;

  5. understand the social life of the post-1997 Hong Kong.



Syllabus:
Students are required to attend seven tutorials and present their views on various aspects of the traditional and modern social lives in Hong Kong. They are encouraged to focus on the cultural and social aspects of Hong Kong society.


  1. Pre-1841 Hong Kong: Wall Communities and the Form of Living

  2. Visit: Markets at Yuen Long, Fanling and Sheung Shui

  3. Domestic Villages and the Survival Strategies

  4. Visit: Tai O – a fishing Village

  5. 1841: The Coming of the Colonial Hong Kong

  6. Visit: Central and Sheung Wan

  7. The Chinese Communities

  8. Visit: Wan Chai

  9. Post-1950’s Hong Kong: the Minimally Integrated Social and Political System

  10. Visit: Hong Kong Museum of History

  11. Modern City Life of Hong Kong: Shopping Malls

  12. Residence Patterns of Hong Kong People: Public Housing and HomeOwnership

  13. Landscape of Hong Kong: Disney World, Tourism and Economic Development

  14. Hong Kong’s Tomorrow



Textbooks and Reference books:
Leung, Benjamin K.P., 1996. Perspectives on Hong Kong Society, Hong Kong: Oxford University Press.

Lau, S.K., et al., various years. Indicators of Social Development: Hong Kong. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Chinese University Press.

Leung, Benjamin, K.P., 1990. Social Issues in Hong Kong. Hong Kong: Oxford University Press.
Various Years, The Other Hong Kong Report, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Chinese University Press.
Subject Title: Community Service

Subject Code: APSS183

Credit Value: 3

Pre-requisite: nil
Learning Activities:
Lecture 28 hours

Tutorial and Student Presentation 14 hours

––––––––

Total 42 hours

The lectures aim to provide the students with an integrated knowledge required for the understanding and application of


  1. introducing knowledge and concepts which enable students to understand the interplay of self, community, and society

  2. enhancing students’ sensitivity to a wide range of social issues in our society

  3. helping students develop genuine concern for other individuals and increase the capacity of self-reflection, personal growth and developing inter-personal skills

  4. nourishing civic consciousness by providing volunteer services to the vulnerable group in the community


Assessment:

In sum, the students’ performance in this subject will be assessed by the following methods:




  1. Pre-service analytical paper – students are required to write a short paper of about 1000 words to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts (i.e. civil society, citizenship, community care) and the relationships of these concepts to volunteer community services.
  2. Peer review on community services – to be conducted within each service team on other team members’ levels of participation and contribution to the workshop.

The student will be given a PASS grade only if students fulfil the following subject requirements with satisfactory performance:




  1. Punctual submission of pre-service analytical paper;

  2. Fulfilment of 12 hours of experimental community services with proper attitudes;

  3. Participation in the workshops and the peer assessment exercise as an active member of the service team.

Continuous Assessment 100%

Examination 0%

––––––––


Total 100%

Learning Outcomes:
On completing this subject, students are expected to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of civil society, citizenship and community care, and be able to relate these concepts to volunteer community services.

  2. Enhance self-understanding, self-confidence, leadership and inter-personal skills.

  3. Experience a personal reflection on direct volunteer services to the community.


Teaching/Learning Methodology




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