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Target ages: 12+


Goals: To use Shabbat vocabulary in a fun activity

Time: 10 minutes



Materials: None

Description of the program:

1. Everyone starts as an amoeba, running around acting it out.


2. Participants play rock-paper-scissors with each other. The winner evolves to the next level – after amoeba, monkey (acts like monkey), and after monkey, Diana Ross (sings “Stop, in the Name of Love”).
3. Shabbat twist #1 - Instead of rock, paper, and scissors, use challah, challah cover, and Kiddush cup – challah cover beats challah (covers it), challah beats Kiddush cup (knocks it over), Kiddush cup beats challah cover (spills wine on it).
4. Shabbat twist #2 – Instead of amoeba, monkey, and Diana Ross, use a progression related to Shabbat, for example Kabbalat Shabbat, Menucha, and Havdallah.

(over)


Counselor’s evaluation and recommendations for future activities

(Please write this section after implementing the program):

*
*
*
*
*
Specialist or supervisor’s evaluation and recommendations for future activities (Please write this section after implementing the program):

*
*
*


*
*
Name of Camp: ___________________________________________

Prepared by Lauren Gross


Program Title: What is Hunger?

Subtitle: A Parsha Time Program for Parshat Ekev


Target ages: 8+



Goals:

* To recognize that hunger affects children and families in our country today

* To acknowledge the blessing of having enough food to eat

* To connect this blessing to the idea of saying ‘thanks’ for food when we eat (as commanded in this week’s Torah portion, Ekev).


Time: 45 minutes



Description of the program:

Objectives:
1. Participants will listen to four different stories about hunger.

2. Participants will role-play different situations, allocating money to feed their family for one day.

3. Participants will define hunger.

4. Participants will think about the kinds of things they would want to say in a ‘thank you’ prayer for food after a meal, and will learn that there is a Jewish blessing for saying ‘thanks’.


Materials:

1.Copies of each of the 4 versions of the “Daily Menu” (amount depends on number of groups)

2. “Hunger Webs”: oak tag with the word HUNGER written in a circle in the center

3. Several markers for each group


1a. Introduction: Stories about Hunger 0:00 – 0:04
Four leaders walk up to the front of the room, one at a time, reading this:

ONE My name is Robert, and I am eight, and have one brother, who is nine. I live with my mother and her new husband. My mother works in a factory, but my stepfather is often unable to work.

My favorite food is pizza. My mother makes it two or three times a month. Usually, we have hamburgers, hot dogs or spaghetti. For breakfast, we eat cereal. We almost never have dessert, not fruit or cookies, much less, ice cream.

The closest grocery store is three miles from my house. Sometimes we do not have enough money both to put gas in the car and buy groceries. So my mother puts gas in the car and goes to a food bank where the food is free. But there isn’t much choice of food and everything is canned. My mother would like to provide a healthier menu for our family.

TWO My name is David, and I am twelve. I live with my mother and grandmother. Also in the house are my brother Tom and sister Samantha, who are teenagers. My grandmother does not work, so she does the cooking.

I remember when my mother had a good job and the family would go to a restaurant once or twice a month. No more. My mother lost her job, but she is lucky enough to have a low-paying job. Before she found this job, my family sometimes waited at the back door of a nearby restaurant and took the food that was thrown into the dumpster.

We don’t do that now, but some days we have only rice to eat. My mother’s salary doesn’t go far when there are also bills for electricity, clothes and


gas. I remember the nice restaurant meals with my family, and I wish we could do that again.
THREE Not everyone who is hungry lives with a family. My name is Nina, and I live alone. I cannot work because I fell and can no longer walk without a cane. Although I enjoy cooking for my grandchildren, I don’t bother to cook for myself. When I eat alone, it is usually cereal or some canned food like spaghetti or soup.

Because I worked as a maid, I don’t get a pension. Every month I worry that I will be unable to pay my bills, or that I will get sick and need expensive medicine.

FOUR My name is Olivia and I am five, and live with my mother, my brother who is seven, and my sister who is eight. All three of us are in school. On school days, we have enough to eat because we eat breakfast and lunch at school. On other days and during vacation time, we don’t always have enough money to buy food for three meals a day.

My mother works but sometimes there is not enough money in her paycheck to pay all the bills and buy food before the next paycheck comes. My sister has a school friend who often invites her for the day when there is no school. Often, she brings snacks home for me and my brother. I wish that I were older and could visit a school friend when there is no school.

2a. “Feeding a Family” Analysis 0:04 – 0:11
PPs break into groups. Group leaders will get one copy of a Daily Menu, based on which of the four families they are examining. The sheet will describe the group’s family and income. Each group will plan a nutritious meal plan for one day, based on the money they have.
2b. “Feeding a Family” Discussion 0:11 – 0:21

When finished with the meal plan analysis, group leaders will read the following two quotations and ask the respective questions to the group. (Note that both questions are from the Pesach story, so are particularly relevant around Pesach-time).

And the Lord said to Moses, “I will rain down bread for you from the sky, and the people shall go out and gather each day that day’s portion – that I may thus test them, to see whether they will follow My instructions or not.” (Exodus 16:4)
Discussion Questions:
1. Why did God only give the Israelites enough food for one day? (ONE possibility: as a test – there is enough food on earth for all, but some people take more than others)

2. Why do you think God gave them food in the wilderness?



3. What do you think God wants for all people?

“And if a stranger sojourn with thee in your land, ye shall not vex him. But the stranger that dwelleth with you shall be unto you as one born among you, and thou shalt love him as thyself; for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt: I am the LORD your God.” Leviticus 19:33-34


Discussion Questions:

1. What do you think that “love the stranger as yourself” means?

2. In this context, what do you think stranger means? How does that compare to your definition of stranger? Could a stranger be someone who is hungry and living in poverty? Can you draw a correlation between today’s “strangers” and the Jewish people in the land of Egypt?

(Groupleader should try to help PP’s think about the ideas that: both “strangers” are

oppressed, both are outcast from society, both need help to survive.)

3. What does this quotation tell us about the way that we should treat others? As Jews, what is our obligation to our society?

4. What do you think are some things that you could do to help out “strangers”?

3a. What is Hunger? – Create a Web 0:23 – 0:31
Groups will join with a partner group, so that there is a board member and a program assistant in each group.
Each group will have a “Hunger Web” (a piece of oak tag with the word HUNGER in the center, in a circle). Group leader will ask PPs to brainstorm about what hunger brings to mind, and PPs will add each word to the web. Possible responses might include: growling stomach, starving, not enough food, too many people to feed and not enough food, skinny, swollen belly, homeless, famine. (Group leader should add to the list if PPs need help!)

3b. What is Hunger? – True or False? 0:31 – 0:33
Group leader will read the following statements (which are all myths!), and then ask the PPs how they feel about each statement. After PPs speak, group leader will add to the comments, by giving the factual responses listed below.

1. “People are hungry because there isn’t enough food.”

RESPONSE: There is more than enough food to feed everyone in the world; the problem is one of unequal distribution. The developing world typically grows adequate food supplies, but exports much of it as cash crops for economic survival and debt relief.

2. “People are hungry because of overpopulation.”

RESPONSE: Even though the population is increasing, global hunger is actually decreasing, because of an increased awareness of the hunger situation, and an increased participation by people and governments around the world.

3. “In order to be ‘really hungry’ a person must be starving.”

RESPONSE: Starvation, which usually occurs in emergency situations such as famine, accounts for only 10% of mortalities due to hunger; 90% of mortality associated with hunger is the result of chronic hunger and conditions associated with poverty over a long time.

3d. What is Hunger? – Define It! 0:33 – 0:40
Group leaders ask PPs to close their eyes and think about what hunger looks like in the United States. With their eyes closed, ask them the following questions, leaving time between each one for them to think about what you are saying (without sharing their thoughts yet):
Do all hungry people have swollen bellies?

Are all hungry people really skinny?

If someone is hungry does that mean they are starving?

Do you know any hungry people?

How can you describe world hunger? How can you describe hunger in the United States?
Ask PPs to open their eyes, and to now share their thoughts about these questions, and then have them define hunger. One member of the group should write and present.
4. What are we thankful for? 0:40-1 hr.
In this week’s Torah portion (Ekev) we are commanded to give thanks for food once we’ve have eaten and been satisfied. We are also warned that when life is good and we have plenty we are not to forget that we receive our blessings from God, and should not take what we have for granted. How would you give thanks for food? In the traditional Birkat hamazon we find the three words that are in this week’s torah portion: V’achalta (and you shall eat), V’savata (and you will be satisfied) u’veyrachta (and then you will bless). Using these three words as a ‘chorus’, create a group rap with a verse or two of things you would like to say thank you for after food. (Note: If these could be ‘performed’ over several meals in the dining room that would be great).

FAMILY 1

Daily Menu

There are three people in your family. You have $18 to spend on food for one day. How can you use this money to provide a nutritious meal? (Costs are for the meal for the whole family.)

Breakfast for three people Dinner for three people

Cereal and fruit: $2 Spaghetti, salad and bread: $5

Frozen waffles and fruit: $3 Hot dogs and soup: $4

Toast: $1 Dinner at a pizza place: $15


Lunch for three people Snacks for three people

Cheese sandwiches: $2 Ice cream: $4

Tuna sandwiches, apples and cookies: $4 Fruit: $2

Peanut butter & jelly sandwiches and carrots: $2 Cheese and crackers: $2


Circle your choices. How much will your menu cost:

per day _____________, per week _____________, per year _____________?





FAMILY 2

Daily Menu
There are five people in your family. You have $18 to spend on food for one day. How can you use this money to provide a nutritious meal? (Costs are for the meal for the whole family.)
Breakfast for five people Dinner for five people

Cereal and fruit: $4 Spaghetti, salad and bread: $8

Frozen waffles and fruit: $5 Hot dogs and soup: $6

Toast: $2 Dinner at a pizza place: $20


Lunch for five people Snacks for five people

Cheese sandwiches: $4 Ice cream: $6

Tuna sandwiches, apples and cookies: $6 Fruit: $3

Peanut butter & jelly sandwiches and carrots: $4 Cheese and crackers: $4

Circle your choices. How much will your menu cost:

per day _____________, per week _____________, per year _____________?


FAMILY 3

Daily Menu
There are four people in your family. You have $8 to spend on food for one day. How can you use this money to provide a nutritious meal? (Costs are for the meal for the whole family.)
Breakfast for four people Dinner for four people

Cereal and fruit: $3 Spaghetti, salad and bread: $7

Frozen waffles and fruit: $4 Hot dogs and soup: $5

Toast: $2 Dinner at a pizza place: $18


Lunch for four people Snacks for four people

Cheese sandwiches: $3 Ice cream: $5

Tuna sandwiches, apples and cookies: $5 Fruit: $2

Peanut butter & jelly sandwiches and carrots: $2 Cheese and crackers: $3


Circle your choices. How much will your menu cost:

per day _____________, per week _____________, per year _____________?



FAMILY 4

Daily Menu
There are four people in your family. You have $30 to spend on food for one day. How can you use this money to provide a nutritious meal? (Costs are for the meal for the whole family.)
Breakfast for four people Dinner for four people

Cereal and fruit: $3 Spaghetti, salad and bread: $7

Frozen waffles and fruit: $4 Hot dogs and soup: $5

Toast: $2 Dinner at a pizza place: $18

Lunch for four people Snacks for four people

Cheese sandwiches: $3 Ice cream: $5

Tuna sandwiches, apples and cookies: $5 Fruit: $2

Peanut butter & jelly sandwiches and carrots: $2 Cheese and crackers: $3

Circle your choices. How much will your menu cost:

per day _____________, per week _____________, per year _____________?


(over)
Counselor’s evaluation and recommendations for future activities

(Please write this section after implementing the program):

*
*
*
*
*
Specialist or supervisor’s evaluation and recommendations for future activities (Please write this section after implementing the program):

*
*
*


*
*

Name of Camp: ___________________________________________



Prepared by: Rabbi Rachel Gurevitz. Adapted from a NFTY program Credits: Sections of this program adopted from “Hunger No More,” a publication sponsored by MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger (www.mazon.org), and also from “kNOw Hunger,” a collection of high-school geared lesson plans, written by the Center on Hunger and Poverty (www.centeronhunger.org) at Brandeis University in conjunction with the Gerta & Kurt Klein Foundation (www.kleinfoundation.org). Originally created for NFTY Long Island by Jason Bronowitz with help from NFTY Staff and NFTY-MAR, SW and SCAL.








Program Title: Moose, Muffin, and Two Mosquitoes

Subtitle: Shabbat Version

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