Tables of Contents



Download 0.68 Mb.
Page8/14
Date conversion04.09.2017
Size0.68 Mb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   14

Target ages: 8+



Goals: To use Shabbat vocabulary in a fun, running around game

Time: 10 minutes



Materials: None

Description of the program:

1. Split into groups of 4. Each group has one moose, one muffin, and two mosquitoes.

2. This is basically a tag game. The moose must try to tag the muffin. However, the mosquitoes protect their muffin.

3. All run around playing in the same area.

4. Shabbat twist Instead of moose, muffin, and mosquitoes, use Havdallah, Shabbat Malkah, and candles.

(over)


Counselor’s evaluation and recommendations for future activities

(Please write this section after implementing the program):

*
*
*
*
*
Specialist or supervisor’s evaluation and recommendations for future activities (Please write this section after implementing the program):

*
*
*


*
*
Name of Camp: ___________________________________________






Program Title: Paper Bag Dramatics


Target ages: 8+


Goals:

* To teach Shabbat vocabulary

* To encourage creativity

* To provide opportunities for teamwork


Time: 45 minutes



Materials:
* Index cards with Shabbat vocabulary words on one side and definitions on the other

* Paper bags (one for each group)

* A different set of random objects in each bag, for example a banana, a hammer, a shoe, a funny hat, a frying pan

Description of the program:

1. Divide participants into groups (about 4-6 per group). Each group gets a paper bag containing a few index cards and a set of random objects (5 minutes).


2. Each group must come up with a skit that teaches the rest of the participants about the terms/concepts on their index cards. The skit must incorporate all of the random objects in their bag (15 minutes).
3. Each group performs their skit for the rest of the participants (5 minutes per skit).

(over)


Counselor’s evaluation and recommendations for future activities

(Please write this section after implementing the program):

*
*
*
*
*
Specialist or supervisor’s evaluation and recommendations for future activities (Please write this section after implementing the program):

*
*
*


*
*

Name of Camp: ___________________________________________



Prepared by Lauren Gross




Program Title: Prophets – The Real Deal


Subtitle: A Parsha Time activity in response to the warning about ‘False Prophets’ in Parshat Shoftim

Target ages: 10+



Goals:

* To familiarize campers with some of the main prophets of Jewish history

* To understand what a prophet does and what kinds of messages they gave

* To think about what a ‘false prophet’ might be that God warns the people not to be fooled by, in comparison with the kinds of prophets we learn about in this program



Time: 45 minutes



Materials:
* Dress up clothes

* Description sheets for each prophet


Description of the program:

  1. People dressed up as prophets will come around to each room and give a brief speech about who they are and what they accomplished in their life, additionally they will try to plead their case for why they should be the prophetic mascot for the camp. Each prophet will hand campers their personal fact sheet.




  1. After the short speech PP’s will be able to ask questions to the prophets, who will answer “in character.”



  1. After the presentations, each group of campers will see if they can summarize what the main teachings of prophets are – what do they want the people to do? What values do they want society to live by? What is their connection with God? What kinds of things might a ‘false prophet’ say to a society that would lead them to follow corrupt values that would harm some people?

  2. Then each small group will vote for their favorite prophet to make the ‘prophetic mascot’ of the camp. Collect the votes from each group and announce the winning prophet.

ABRAHAM


According to Jewish tradition, Abraham was born under the name Abram in the city of Ur in Babylonia in the year 1948 from Creation (circa 1800 BCE). He was the son of Terach, an idol merchant, but from his early childhood, he questioned the faith of his father and sought the truth. He came to believe that the entire universe was the work of a single Creator, and he began to teach this belief to others.

Abram tried to convince his father, Terach, of the folly of idol worship. One day, when Abram was left alone to mind the store, he took a hammer and smashed all of the idols except the largest one. He placed the hammer in the hand of the largest idol. When his father returned and asked what happened, Abram said, "The idols got into a fight, and the big one smashed all the other ones." His father said, "Don't be ridiculous. These idols have no life or power. They can't do anything." Abram replied, "Then why do you worship them?"

Eventually, the one true Creator that Abram had worshipped called to him, and made him an offer: if Abram would leave his home and his family, then G-d would make him a great nation and bless him. Abram accepted this offer, and the b'rit (covenant) between G-d and the Jewish people was established. (Gen. 12).

The idea of b'rit is fundamental to traditional Judaism: we have a covenant, a contract, with G-d, which involves rights and obligations on both sides. We have certain obligations to G-d, and G-d has certain obligations to us. The terms of this b'rit became more explicit over time, until the time of the Giving of the Torah. Abram was subjected to ten tests of faith to prove his worthiness for this covenant. Leaving his home is one of these trials.

Abram, raised as a city-dweller, adopted a nomadic lifestyle, traveling through what is now the land of Israel for many years. G-d promised this land to Abram's descendants. Abram is referred to as a Hebrew (Ivri), possibly because he was descended from Eber or possibly because he came from the "other side" (eber) of the Euphrates River.

But Abram was concerned, because he had no children and he was growing old. Abram's beloved wife, Sarai, knew that she was past child-bearing years, so she offered her maidservant, Hagar, as a wife to Abram. This was a common practice in the region at the time. According to tradition, Hagar was a daughter of Pharaoh, given to Abram during his travels in Egypt. She bore Abram a son, Ishmael, who, according to both Muslim and Jewish tradition, is the ancestor of the Arabs. (Gen 16)

When Abram was 100 and Sarai 90, G-d promised Abram a son by Sarai. G-d changed Abram's name to Abraham (father of many), and Sarai's to Sarah (from "my princess" to "princess"). Sarah bore Abraham a son, Isaac (in Hebrew, Yitzchak), a name derived from the word "laughter," expressing Abraham's joy at having a son in his old age. (Gen 17-18). Isaac was the ancestor of the Jewish people. [Abraham died at the age of 175.]



1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   14


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page