Talk about differences, and let the children write descriptive sentences/poems about some of the different color shades in the book



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Cuba

Overview of Text Set: Integrated Activities for Culture Study
Day/Session One: Introduce cultural topics study by introducing Shades of People.

Literacy: Talk about differences, and let the children write descriptive sentences/poems about some of the different color shades in the book.

Art: Have multicultural skin tone crayons, paint or construction paper and different shades of yarn for them to make their own faces or groups of faces.
Day/Session Two: Read together Same, Same, Different, Different.

Math: Have students draw Venn diagrams in groups, for different pages of the book, to show what the two boys have or do that’s the same, and what’s different. For older students, have them calculate the time differences in the two locations.

Social Studies: Have children locate India on a map or globe and draw an outline of it as well as one of the USA. Discuss how people travel from one country to another, and sometimes come to live in another country. Invite class members who have traveled from another country to come to America to live to tell what that country is.
Day/Session Three: Introduce Cuba (Countries of the World)

Review the facts that some members are from other places, specifically Cuba, and that the whole class now will have an opportunity to become knowledgeable about this beautiful place. Introduce Cuba (Countries of the World), telling the class that the book will be available for them to read/look at individually for several days. They should use sticky notes to identify sections or pictures they liked or want to know more about.


Social Studies: Ask the student from Cuba to help identify on a map, the Smart board or computer where Cuba is located. Point out the oceans and countries surrounding the area.


Literacy: Introduce Martina the Beautiful Cockroach by explaining that this story is set in Cuba and is a folk tale (may need to review what a folk tale is). Read aloud. Invite students to tell their favorite parts of the story. Review new vocabulary, talk about how context helps you to figure out the meanings.
Day/Session Four: Review what the class knows now about Cuba by doing a KWL chart. Expand the “what I would like to know” column.

Literacy: Present the book Alicia Alonso Prima Ballerina. Discuss who Alicia Alonso was (biography in book) and what the ballet is.

Art: This book is written in beautiful verse with stunning artwork. Have paper and watercolors (just like the book) available for students to create artwork of their own vision of Alicia Alonso in a ballet.
Day/Session Five: Discuss students’ experiences with Cuban food.

Cooking Connection: Using Memories of a Cuban Kitchen: More than 200 Classic Recipes create with the class or ahead of time, one or more dishes from the Cuban cookbook. Discuss similarities/differences to food they have had before. (This may be a new experience for some students. Discuss ways to comment on food that contributes positively to conversation.)
Day/Session Six: Read Learning about Determination from the Life of Gloria Estefan.

Discuss her journey and how her ethnic background is a rich part of her life.



  • This activity can be used with other books about famous people from Cuba

Day/Session Seven: Review by adding on and finishing the KWL chart.

Refer to Cuba (Countries of the World), and read some selections that children may have marked individually with sticky notes, which they found interesting or wanted to know more about.


Culminating Activity: (Could be spread out over several days.) Have each child make collage and write words, sentences or poems about Cuba. Assemble the finished pieces into a book to present to the child from Cuba, as a thank you for helping them learn more about the world.


Cuba
Brandt, Ed. (1997). Rafael Palmeiro. NY: Mitchell Lane. ISBN-13: 978-1883845384, 128 pgs.


This book is an authorized biography of an Orioles baseball player, Rafael Palmeiro As the title suggests the primary focus of the story is baseball. Included is a history of the Baltimore Orioles, background on Cuban baseball, and details of the Orioles 1996 and 1997 seasons. The 128-page chapter book contains several black and white photographs.




Deedy, C.A. (2007). Martina the beautiful cockroach. Ill. M. Austin. Atlanta: Peachtree. ISBN: 978-1-56145-399-3, unpaged.

In this humorous retelling of the familiar Cuban folktale, Martina (based on the real-life beautiful Cuban cockroach, Panclora nivea) receives some shocking advice on how to catch a husband from her Abuela involving what is called “The Coffee Test.” Martina ‘burns’ through several suitors until finding just the right one. Austin’s amazing illustrations add magic to the story and will cause the reader to never look at a cockroach the same way again.



Deedy, C.A. (1997). Growing up Cuban in Decatur, Georgia. Atlanta: Peachtree. ISBN: 978-1-56145-318-4. Audio recording: 49:35 min.


This collection of stories told by Deedy on National Public Radio is an excellent way to understand Cuban culture. Deedy uses stories like “The Peanut Man” and “Traffic Court” from her own childhood in Cuba to entertain the reader. This is appropriate for both teachers and children to listen to as a way to enhance their understanding of Cuban culture.




Lafreniere, Kenneth. (1999) El Duque: The Story of Orlando Hernandez. NewYork: Random. ISBN-13: 978-0375801976, 95 pgs.


El Duque was a poor boy growing up in Cuba when he discovered his talent for baseball. As an adult, he grew to become one of Cuba’s most beloved baseball players. When his younger brother defected to the US to play baseball, the Cuban government banned El Duque from playing baseball fearing he would do the same. El Duque HAD to play baseball. He and some friends made the scary passage across shark infested waters in a rickety boat and eventually made it to Florida and he played for the New York Yankees.


Mara, William P. (2006) Cuba (Countries of the World). New York: Bridgestone books.



This 24 page book discusses the history, landscape, people, animals, food, sports, and culture of Cuba. The last few pages of the book provide information about how to play Cuban games, learn to speak Spanish, words to know, books providing more information and internet sites.




Milstein, Jeffrey. (2010) Cuba: Photographs by Jeffrey Milstein. New York: Monacelli Press. ISBN-13: 978-1580932752

The images in this book mirror reality in Cuba and offer an orientation to its complexities by presenting realistic and honest glimpses of life in Cuba. The artful presentation and more than one hundred stunning photographs portray a story far more revealing and intimate than words can tell. Rare views of Cubans at work and play will dispel inaccurate ideas about them and will draw you into the history of our most fascinating neighbor.


Randelman, Mary Urrutia and Schwartz, Joan. (1996) Memories of a Cuban Kitchen: More Than 200 Classic Recipes. New York: Wiley. ISBN-13: 978-0028609980

This adult cookbook receives high ratings for accuracy. According to the Washington Times, "The best foreign cookbook honors go to Memories of a Cuban Kitchen. The book rings wonderfully true, both in its recipes and its evocations of pre-Castro Havana as recalled by author Mary Urrutia Randelman with heartfelt affection. This beautiful book is a memory piece as much as a cookbook."

Sciurba, Katie and Rodriguez, Edel. (2009) Oye, Celia! New York: Holt. ISBN-13: 978-0805074680


Sciurba’s love of Celia Cruz’s music inspired her to create this rhythmic tribute to the famous Cuban singer. The text describes what the reader hears in Celia’s music, including sadness, loss, and happiness. Spanish words are included in the text, with a detailed glossary at the end. Rodriguez’s vibrant illustrations capture the magic of Celia’s music.



Strazzabosco, Jeanne M. (2003) Learning about Determination from the Life of Gloria Estefan. New York: PowerKids. ISBN-13: 978-0823924165


This is a short biography of the Cuban born rock singer, Gloria Estefan. The book focuses on her determination to succeed and be happy in spite of serious obstacles. Full-page photos opposite each page of text help explain her life. Some words appear in bold type and are defined in the glossary. This book offers young readers someone to emulate.




Gernier-Grand, Carmen. (2011) Alicia Alonso: Prima Ballerina. Tarrytown, NY: Marshall Cavendish

In elegant free verse and stunning artwork rendered in watercolor, colored pencils, and lithograph pencils on watercolor paper, Carmen T. Bernier-Grand and Raúl Colón capture the seminal events in Alonso’s life. The back matter includes a biography, Alonso’s ballets, choreography, and awards, a glossary, sources, notes, and websites



Rotner, S. & Kelly, S. (2009) Shades of People. New York: Scholastic.


Cocoa, tan, rose, and almond--people come in lots of shades, even in the same family. This exploration of one of our most noticeable physical traits uses vibrant photographs of children and a short text to inspire young children both to take notice and to look beyond the obvious.




Kostecki-Shaw, J. S. (2011) Same, Same but Different. New York: Henry Holt.

Elliot lives in America, and Kailash lives in India. They are pen pals. By exchanging letters and pictures, they learn that they both love to climb trees, have pets, and go to school. Their worlds might look different, but they are actually similar. Same, same. But different! Through an inviting point-of-view and colorful, vivid illustrations, this story shows how two boys living oceans apart can be the best of friends.



Websites

http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/na.htm
http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/mapping/interactive-map/?ar_a
Fiction Lesson
Deedy, C.A. (2007). Martina the beautiful cockroach. Ill. M. Austin. Atlanta: Peachtree. ISBN: 978-1-56145-399-3, unpaged.What do you think is the best way to pick a husband? In this humorous retelling of the familiar Cuban folktale, Martina (based on the real-life beautiful Cuban cockroach, Panclora nivea) receives some shocking advice from her Abuela involving what is called “The Coffee Test”. Needless to say, Martina ‘burns’ through several suitors until finding just the right one. Austin’s amazing illustrations add magic to the story and will cause the reader to never look at a cockroach the same way again.


Possible questions/strategies:

Common Core Standard Alignment

Before reading:




  • What do you notice about the title? The illustration?

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*



  • What do you think the book might be about? (What do readers do before they ever open the book?)

Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.


During reading:




  • What do you think is going to happen?

  • Has your prediction been confirmed or changed? What information from the text supports your thinking? (How do you know?)

Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.



  • What do you notice about the illustrations?




After reading:




  • What surprised you in the book?




  • What was your favorite part of the book?




  • Retell or summarize the story.




Key Ideas and Details

2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.



  • Write or tell the sequel. What do you think happens next?




Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.


  • Has anything happened to you that reminds you of this story?


  • Does this remind you of any other story that you know? How so?

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.




  • Illustrate your favorite part of the story.







  • Illustrate (or write) what you think is the most important part of the story. Why?

  • What do you think is the big idea the author wants you to take away from this story? (theme)

Key Ideas and Details

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.




Rereadings




  • Using context, what do some of the vocabulary words mean? (i.e. abuzz, stunned)

  • How did the author help you to understand the Spanish words she used? (Abuela)

Craft and Structure

4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and

figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.


Websites of interest: Cuban cockroaches-www.bugguide.net, http://www.carmenagradeedy.com

Nonfiction Lesson

Strazzabosco, Jeanne M. (2003) Learning about Determination from the Life of Gloria Estefan. New York: PowerKids. ISBN-13: 978-0823924165. This is a short biography of the Cuban born rock singer, Gloria Estefan. The book focuses on her determination to succeed and be happy in spite of serious obstacles. Full-page photos opposite each page of text help explain her life. Some words appear in bold type and are defined in the glossary. This book offers young readers someone to emulate.



Possible questions/strategies:

Common Core Standard Alignment www.corestandards.org

Before reading:




  • What do you notice about the title? The cover illustration?

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*




  • What do you think the book might be about? (What do readers do before they ever open the book?)

Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.



During reading:




  • What interesting things about Gloria Estefan do you notice as you read? What is she like?

  • Does Gloria Estefan remind you of anyone you know? How?

Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.



After reading:




  • What surprised you in the book?




  • What was your favorite part of the book?




  • How would your life be different if you lived in Cuba? How would your life be the same?

Key Ideas and Details

2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.



  • Illustrate one thing you learned from the book.




Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.




  • Illustrate (or write) what you think is the most important part of this book. Why?

  • What do you think is a big idea about Gloria Estefan the author wants you to take away from this book? (theme)

Key Ideas and Details

2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.



Rereadings




  • How did the author help you to understand some important information about Cuba?

Key Ideas and Details

2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.



  • Use the text to figure out some of the unknown vocabulary: shyness, scholarship, determination


Craft and Structure

4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and

figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word

choices shape meaning or tone.





Cuba



Population: 11.2 million (2010); 70% Urban, 30% Rural
Capital: Habana (Havanna, pop. 2 million)
Area: 42,427 square miles (109,886 sq. km)

Terrain: Flat or gently rolling plains, hills; mountains up to 6,000 feet in the southeast.
Languages: Spanish
Religions: Roman Catholic 60%, Protestant/Other 40%
Currency: Cuban Peso (CUP)
Economy: Major industries: Sugar, petroleum, tobacco, construction, nickel, steel, cement, agricultural machinery, pharmaceuticals

Agriculture Products: Sugar, tobacco, citrus and tropical fruits, coffee, rice, beans, meat, vegetables

Natural Resources: Nickel, cobalt, iron core, copper, manganese, salt, timber
Literacy: 95%
Location: Caribbean, island between the Caribbean Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean

Leader of Cuba Fidel Castro who led a rebel army to victory in 1959 and the Current President is Raul Castro
Climate and Physical Features: Tropical, moderated by trade winds; dry season (November-April); rainy season (May-October)
Resources:

http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/russia.htm
International Children’s Digital Library: en.childrenslibrary.org For digital books in different languages


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