Teaching Evaluation Skills



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Teaching Evaluation Skills: See ‘Evidence Based Teaching’ ch 24 for a full account

Make sure your students and you are clear on what ‘evaluation’ means exactly. What is the process involved? The following pages show some approaches. Once you have decided on a model or evaluation frame make sure your students know when and were it applies, for example:


  • For evaluations

  • For critical reviews

  • If the questions asks for “your opinion on the effectiveness’ or some such phrase

  • Etc.



Making use of your evaluation model or thinking frame


  1. Ask your students to do an evaluation of some kind in class, without going into much or any detail about what evaluation means.

e.g. ‘Now I want you to evaluate this care plan’

‘What do you think of the design of this website?’

  1. Ask students to do their evaluation alone for a few minutes, just creating bullet points.

  2. Then ask students to compare their evaluations in pairs and to create a combined evaluation. Students will then produce and improved evaluation, but will also improve each other’s mental model of evaluation slightly. For example one student may realise that they only thought of strengths, and forgot about weaknesses.

  3. Ask the pairs to get together in fours, and again to produce a combined evaluation. Again students will learn from each other

  4. Ask the groups of four in turn to give you one bullet point in turn. Write up the useful points on the board and discuss this evaluation

  5. Ask your students ‘how did you do that?’ or ‘what is an evaluation?’ They work on this in fours.
  6. Get their ideas back and critically appraise their model of evaluation until the class agrees a model, like one below, which you think is useful, and that they should be able to work with.


  7. Ask them where else they could use such a model, perhaps giving them a series of tasks, and asking them when they would use their model and when they would not. For example they should use it when asked ‘how effective is this training plan?’ but not use it when asked ‘to describe the main features of this training plan.’

  8. Some time in the very near future set them another evaluation task as a class, without mentioning the model:

e.g. ‘How important is the District Nurses Role?

Or ‘What do you think of this graphics design?’



one minute into the task or so say… “I notice some of you are using the evaluation model we designed the other day. That’s a great idea. Why do you think it will help us with this task?’

Students who are not using the model can be made to realise that the model will stop them making the mistakes they made last time, e.g. forgetting to think about weaknesses as well as strengths.

Models to teach students to evaluate.
These can all be drawn up roughly when ever they are needed, choose or better adapt one for your subject. They are graphic organisers which are known to greatly improve students’ performance. They need to be bigger than shown here, A3 size often helps. Students write their thoughts into these in groups at first then when they are used to this, they try a few by themselves then compare their work with a neighbours to improve their own work ‘peer editing’.
Model 1 strengths and weaknesses

Strengths



Weaknesses
























Strengths

Weaknesses

Improvements































Model 2: Fitness for Purpose




Goals: 1.

2.


Strengths in

relation to goals


Weaknesses in

relation to goals

























Model 3: Means to ends


Goals: 1.

2.

3.





Strengths in relation to goals

Weaknesses in relation to goals

Possible

Improvements

Subject of the evaluation

































Alternatives

(other routes to goals)



















etc









Model 4: Relativist means to ends


Goals: 1.

2.

3.






Strengths in relation to goals

Weaknesses in relation to goals

Possible

Improvements

Subject of the evaluation



































Alternatives

(other routes to goals)




















Points of view





















etc









E

Visual aids


  • Were they easy to read from the back?

  • Did they explain well

  • Did you give everyone a copy to take away?

  • Was your handout detailed enough?



valuation with ‘Spectacles’ (criteria approach)



Your Unit 3 presentation

Planning

  • Did you have a plan for your session. Did it make clear who was going to do/say what?


  • Did you have all your materials etc at hand?

Evidence


What evidence do you have that your presentation was effective apart from your own views?

So….. my conclusions based on the above

My views

Geoff Petty ‘03


Structure and activities


  • Was the material presented in a clear and logical way?

  • Did you use questions to check that people understood your main points?

  • Did you summarise the key points



Understanding


  • Did you research the topic enough?

  • Did you research from a variety of sources?

  • Did you understand and explain well?



E

Stakeholders


What are the views and interests of all those affected?
What are the views of experts, popular opinion, etc

valuation with ‘Spectacles’ (Generic criteria approach)



What you’re

evaluating

Intentions

What is it trying to do?

What are, or should be, the intentions?

Consider aims, purpose, objectives etc

Are these intentions justified?


Consequences


Does it do what it is trying to do?

Consequences can be:



  • positive and negative

  • intended and unintended

  • inevitable or avoidable




  • Were the original Intentions achieved?

  • What would be the consequences of the alternatives?

  • Is an alternative better?



Alternatives


What are the other ways of doing it?

What are the alternative intentions and strategies,?



Evidence


What is the evidence for and against your views and the views of others that you have considered?

So….. my conclusions based on the above

My views

Geoff Petty ‘03

Ethics and rights


Is it moral? Are individuals being sacrificed to the majority? (the main problem with utilitarian thinking)




Other criteria based evaluation materials:

Suggested Questions for students to use in classroom discussions of poetry (From Ros McCulloch “‘A’ level literature” Pearsons Publishing Cambridge)

Questions to ask yourself:


Title/s

Speakers and audience

Settings

Time/s

Attitude/s

Language

What to the key words in the title bring to mind?
Could they, or the whole title, have more than one meaning?
Do you need to check the meaning of any words?

Who is the speaker?
It is usually, but not always, the poet.
Who is the poet addressing, him/herself, us, a listener inside or outside the poem?

Where is the poem set?
Is the setting the same throughout?
Does it change inside or between verses or sections of the poem?
If so, how does the setting change and why?

When does the experience take place?
Is it the same time throughout?
Does the time change inside or between verses or sections of the poem?
If so how does the time change and why?

What is the poet’s attitude towards the subject of the poem?
Does it change during the course of the poem?
Does he/she resolve questions which are raised?
Do any contradictions or problems remain?



Which words/phrases interest or impress you?
Are there any words which look, feel or sound like the experience being described?
Are there any comparisons which help you to imagine the experience?
Are there any striking arrangements such as lists or repetitions which relate to the poet’s subject?

WHAT IS THE POEM ABOUT?

Suggested Questions for students to use in classroom discussions of a story (suggested by Ros McCulloch author of ‘A’ level literature’ Pearson’s Publishing Cambridge)
Questions to ask yourself:


Story

Theme

Character

Settings

Language

What seem to be the main events on your first reading?
Do some events assume more significance when you look back at them after later developments?
What’s the shape of the story? (happy to sad? Loss to recovery? Growing-up process?)
Are there any of the following in the text?

  • Unresolved matters?

  • Ambiguities?

  • Unsatisfactory parts?




What themes emerge? (for example, responsibility, conflict, parental relationships)
Do some come to have more significance than others?
What are your views on how these themes are treated?

Who are the characters?
How are the characters introduced?
What do you see as their characteristics?
How do they relate to others?
How so they change and get changed by others?
What effect do events have on them?
What is the author’s view of the characters?

When/where are the events set?
How are the settings in the novel described?
How do they influence the events/responses of the characters?
How does the author create various moods with settings?
Do these emphasise or contrast with events?
Can you see a pattern to the settings?

Are there any key words, recurring word patterns, recurring images?

From whose perspective are episodes seen?
What is the balance between description and action?
What is the tone?

(for example, ironic, humorous, serious – remember it may well vary throughout the text.





The Mountain Model of Evaluation





Or each climber, e.g. customer, manager, worker sees the subject through different spectacles.




Other analogies or visualisations of evaluation

weaknesses




goals

Sub-ject

Altern-ative 1








strengths

Analogies or visualisations in thinking frames


Goals: 1.

2.

3.





Strengths

Weaknesses


Improvements



Subject



































Alternatives


















Points of view




















etc










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