Teaching Sequence Literacy Learning Outcomes



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BASICS project


Teaching Sequence

Literacy Learning Outcomes

Science Learning Outcomes

Key Content


Resources

Key Vocabulary/

Questions

Assessment


1
Sorting Materials according to their specific properties using given criteria.

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:
- Develop knowledge and understanding of opposites, e.g. hard/soft, dull/shiny, etc.


  • Appreciate the need to use descriptive vocabulary in order to describe properties of materials.




  • Participate in a shared reading experience with the rest of the class.




By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:


  • Use a feely box to develop an appreciation that every material has many properties, which can be recognised using our senses and described using appropriate vocabulary.




  • Sort a random collection of materials according to their specific properties, using sorting circles.


- Record observations/results appropriately by creating a material dictionary.

Preparation:

Make the storybook entitled ‘In with a splash!’ into a feely book by adding/attaching objects, e.g. cotton wool, pebbles, etc.

To introduce the lesson read the story ‘In with a splash!’ allowing children to some up and feel the book.
Introduce children to a series of describing words using the feely box.
Pupils will sort objects into groups giving reasons for their choice of groupings, using everyday terms, such as hard, smooth, shiny, etc.
Children will create a material dictionary.
Allow children to draw their favourite part of the story.
In order to conclude lesson, have a whole class review session





  • Storybook

Smith, K. (2006) In with a Splash! Igloo Books Ltd. Illustrated by Karen Sapp.

- Information Book – Byrant-Mole, K. (1999) Materials and their properties. Heinemann Library.



- Feely box containing a range of materials that are rough/smooth, hard/soft, etc.

- Range of materials that can be used for sorting, e.g. sponge, stone, teddy, twig, etc.



- Sorting circles for each pair of children (x15)

- A4 paper so the children can draw the part of the story they liked the best.


  • Properties of materials: dull/shiny, soft/hard, smooth/rough, touch, feel, etc.


- Words relating to literacy aspect: opposite, describing words, front cover, illustrator, author, spine, etc.

What does the word opposite mean?


What is the opposite of dull?
What do you think might happen next in the story?
Which activity did you enjoy best today?
  • Depth of understanding will be assessed through the completion of a recording task sheet (material dictionary).





  • Children’s ability to use comparative language to describe similarities and differences between different objects.

- Pupil’s ability to use a variety of describing words during discussion.




  • Do the children recognise that dull is opposite to shiny?

- Can the children draw a picture that they can explain, relating to the storybook read as part of this lesson?




Teaching Sequence

Literacy Learning Outcomes

Science Learning Outcomes

Key Content

Resources

Key Vocabulary/

Questions

Assessment


2
Sorting Materials.
Can P2 help Bertie Bunny describe the materials in his home?

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:


  • Develop knowledge and understanding of how sentences are constructed, through the use of a storybook.

- Appreciate the need to use descriptive vocabulary in order to describe properties of materials.


- Participate in a shared reading experience with the rest of the class.
- Predict what happens next at appropriate stages in the storybook.

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:


  • Recognise that some objects can be made from a range of materials. For example, in the kitchen spoons can be made from plastic, metal or wood.


  • Use ICT to sort a collection of materials, progressing from practical, concrete objects to working with pictorial objects.





  • Reinforce and consolidate previous learning, by taking part in a range of practical activities. Through these activities children will develop an appreciation that every material has many properties, which can be recognised using our senses and described using appropriate vocabulary.

Preparation:

Scan/project the storybook entitled ‘Bertie Bunny’s BIG Adventure’ onto the Interactive Whiteboard.


Read storybook ‘Bertie Bunny’s BIG Adventure’ to the whole class.
The 30 pupils will be split into three groups (i.e. 3 groups of 10) and workstations will be set up.
The activities included are as follows;

  • At workstation 1, children will use the CD-ROM entitled ‘All about Materials’ to sort materials (for full reference refer to resource list).

  • At workstation 2, children will use a feely box and sort a collection of objects using sorting circles.

  • At workstation 3, children will use the paint programme on the computers to draw the part of the story they liked the best.

Conclude lesson by completing a cut and stick task sheet.





- Interactive Whiteboard with storybook entitled ‘Bertie Bunny’s BIG Adventure’ scanned in;

Gaby Goldsack (2005) Bertie Bunny’s BIG Adventure. Igloo Books Ltd.



- Word cards – hard, soft, dull, shiny, rough, smooth, etc.

- CD-ROM - Granada Learning (2001) All about Materials. Motivating activities to promote scientific thought!

- Coloured sticky labels for grouping children during development of lesson.


- Feely box containing materials that are rough/smooth, hard/soft, etc.

- Range of materials for sorting e.g. sponge, stone, teddy, twig, etc

- Sorting circles (x 6)

- Computers loaded with paint programme

- A4 paper for printing

- Cut and stick task sheet (x 30)



  • Properties of materials: dull/shiny, soft/hard, smooth/rough, touch, feel, harder, softer, etc.


- Words relating to literacy aspect: sentence, full stop, capital letter, punctuation, speech marks.

- Can anyone tell me what our story was about?

- How do you write a sentence?

- What do you think might happen next in the story?

- Which activity did you enjoy best today?


Pupil’s ability to pose and answer questions orally relating to the different properties of a range of materials.
Ability to use resources correctly and make observations/comparisons.
Ability to complete the simple cut and stick sorting activity.

Teaching Sequence

Literacy Learning Outcomes

Science Learning Outcomes

Key Content

Resources

Key Vocabulary/

Questions

Assessment


3
Floating and sinking.
(Do all materials float?)

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:

  • Participate in a shared reading experience with the rest of the class.


- Predict what might happen next in the story, offering reasons.

Complete a science planning board, by taking part in a shared writing experience.




By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:


  • Plan a science investigation by considering the procedure that will be used to test whether certain objects float or sink.

  • Develop understanding that some materials float and some sink, by testing a range of objects, using a water tray.




  • Record what happened, drawing conclusions and communicating the results of the investigation.



Preparation:

In order to make reading more pleasurable, the book will be projected onto the Interactive Whiteboard


Introduce the topic using the storybook entitled ‘Hooray for Hippo’. Discuss the features of the book, for example; the spine, front page, back page, price, etc. (Attach labels to the book)

Through shared writing complete a science planning sheet. Ask questions such as “What do we want to know?” “What will we change?” “What will we measure or observe” “What will we keep the same?”.



Divide the class into 3 groups of ten. (Groups will rotate so each child will be provided with an opportunity to complete each task)

Two groups will work at the computers, using the CD-ROM entitled ‘All about materials (for reference refer to resource list)’. The class teacher will supervise this activity.


The other group of ten children will work with me at the water tray. Provide the children with a range of different materials and ask then to compare those that float and sink.

After the children have completed the science planning sheet with your help, allow the children to test the objects. Record on the recording sheet provided.

To conclude allow the children to read and learn the nursery rhyme ‘Row, row, your boat’.


- Interactive Whiteboard with storybook entitled ‘Hooray for Hippo’ scanned in;

Haddock, P. (2006) Hooray for Hippo. Php Publishing. Australia.

- Typed labels to stick on storybook – front cover, spine, back cover, etc.

- Word cards – hard, soft, dull, shiny, rough, smooth, etc.

- Computers loaded with CD-ROM entitled ‘All about Materials’:

Granada Learning (2001) All about Materials - Motivating activities to promote scientific thought!

- Fill the water trough with coloured water and make the objects readily accessible.

- Collection of objects and corresponding word cards e.g. lids, polystyrene, plastic duck, string, coin, nail, pin, etc.

- Recording sheet (x 30)

- Enlarged science planning board so the class can plan the investigation together

- Enlarged recording sheet so I can model how to record using a smiley or sad face

- Copy of the nursery rhyme ‘Row, row, row your boat’ –

(Internet source – www.zelo.com/family/nursery/rowrowrow.asp)



- Words relating to science aspect: float, sink, heavier, lighter, etc.

  • Words relating to literacy aspect: nursery rhyme, rhyming word, front cover, spine, author, etc.

- Why do you think this object floats?



  • Do all light objects float?

  • What does the work sink mean?

Ask the children to consider why certain objects float? It is because they are lighter? More durable? Does a bottle float if it is full of water? What about half full of water? What does it mean the word sink mean? Do all heavy things sink? Do all light things float?


Pupil’s ability to pose and answer questions orally about the investigation taking place.
Participation and contribution to the completion of the science planning board.
Ability to use resources correctly and make observations/comparisons.
Pupil’s ability to ask constructive questions relating to the storybook and the investigation being carried out.

Children’s ability to use a variety of describing words relating to the topic being tested.


Children’s ability to learn and recite a nursery rhyme.

Teaching Sequence

Literacy Learning Outcomes

Science Learning Outcomes

Key Content

Resources

Key Vocabulary/

Questions

Assessment


4
Absorbency of paper
(What is the best paper to use to mop up water?)

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:


  • Listen to and watch the story entitled ‘Puddle Trouble’ on the Discovery Dog DVD.

- Plan a scientific investigation by taking part in a shared writing experience with the whole class.




  • Watch a video outlining the paper making process and complete a simple cut and sticky activity related to the concept.

- Listen to two short poems written about the different uses of paper.




By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:

- Investigate the properties of different types of paper, beginning to notice similarities and differences.



  • Appreciate the concept of absorbency by planning and carrying out a towel test using different types of paper.

- Recognise that some materials exist naturally and some are manufactured and processed, e.g. paper.




- Listen to and watch the story entitled ‘Puddle Trouble’ on the Discovery Dog DVD (1) (this is fully referenced in the resource list).

  • Discuss the different properties of paper by referring to a range of information books.

  • Use the Discovery Dog planning poster to plan the investigation collaboratively with the whole-class.

  • Undertake an investigation and test different types of paper, using appropriate equipment, e.g. water and dropper pipette.

  • Record observations, by completing a simple pre-drawn recording sheet.

  • Complete a matching activity related to the paper making process.

Watch a video outlining the paper making process (this is fully referenced in the resource list) and discuss what they liked and disliked about the lesson.


- Interactive Whiteboard.

- Lancashire County Council (2006) Discovery Dog DVD (1). Devised and created by Atkinson, P., Blacklock, K., Childe, J. and Eccles, D.

- Naughty Nora puppet

- Discovery Dog planning poster

- Pre-drawn recording sheet (x 30)

- Different types of paper, e.g. newspaper, wrapping paper, writing paper, brown paper, greaseproof paper, tinfoil and kitchen roll

- Beaker with water and pipette

Information Books

    • Oxlade, C. (2002) Materials: Paper. Heinemann.


    • Edwards, N. and Harris, J. (1999) Science Explorers: Paper – Exploring the Science of everyday materials. Black Publishers Limited.

    • Wallace, H. (2006) How we use materials: Paper. Hachette Children’s Books.

  • Copies of paper poems;

  • Williams, B. (2000) Trees. Heinemann.

  • Eames, S. (2000) Paper. Heinemann.

These poems are taken from Bishop, J. (1990) (Ed.) Bright ideas for early years: Science activities. Leamington Spa: Scholastic Publications.

    • Video player, television and copy of video entitled ‘Come outside with Auntie Mabel and Pippin, Natural Materials: Paper’;

      • BBC (1998) Come outside with Auntie Mabel and Pippin, Natural Materials: Paper. BBC School Programmes.

- Words relating to science aspect: absorb, dry up, soak up, manufactured, man-made, natural.

- Words relating to literacy aspect: rhyme, rhythm, poetry, sequence, cut and stick, match.


- Can anyone tell/remind me what we did last Thursday?

- How are we going to help Discovery Dog?

- What problem does Discovery Dog have?

- What do you notice about this poem? Does it rhyme?

- How are we going to carry out this investigation?

- What materials do we need?

- What does the phrase ‘fair test’ mean?

- How do you think paper is made?



- Is paper a valuable resource?

- Which activity did you enjoy best today?

  • Ability to use resources correctly and make observations/comparisons.





  • Ability to complete pre-drawn science recording sheet by ticking a smiley or sad face.




  • Can the children comment on their findings, recognising that paper is a useful resource?




  • Can the children report back to Discovery Dog and tell him the best paper to use and why?

Teaching Sequence

Literacy Learning Outcomes

Science Learning Outcomes

Key Content

Resources

Key Vocabulary/

Questions

Assessment


5
Changing materials – Melting chocolate
(Which melts quicker? – Big pieces or small pieces of chocolate?)
Children should be made aware of potential hazards and the appropriate actions necessary to avoid risks.

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:
- Listen to and watch the story entitled ‘A Sticky Situation’ on the Discovery Dog DVD.

  • Participate in a shared writing experience, in order to plan a science investigation using the Discovery Dog planning poster.

Develop knowledge and understanding of the concept of melting, through the use of a poem.

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:


  • Recognise that some materials change when they are heated, e.g. chocolate.
  • Plan a science investigation to find out whether big pieces or small pieces of chocolate melt more quickly.


  • Record what happened by making comparisons and drawing conclusions.

  • Melt white and brown chocolate and make rice crispy buns.




Introduce the children to the concept of melting by allowing the children to watch a short story entitled ‘A sticky situation’ on the Discovery Dog DVD.
Use the puppet Naughty Nora and ask the children “What do you think happened when Naughty Nora sat on the chocolate?” “Why do you think that?”
Carry out the experiment with the whole-class. Make sure that the class are helping you follow the plan.
Introduce the words, solid, liquid, melt, smaller, larger, faster, etc.
Read a poem entitled ‘Eating Chocolate’ (for reference refer to resource list) to the class relating to melting chocolate.
Discuss how rice crispy buns are made.
Ask children to describe the differences they observed.

- Interactive Whiteboard

- Lancashire County Council (1996) Discovery Dog DVD (2). Devised and created by Atkinson, P., Blacklock, K., Childe, J. and Eccles, D.

- Naughty Nora puppet

- Chocolate bars and cake decorations

- Hot water

- Bowl (x2)

- Saucepan (x2)

- Rice krispies

- Discovery Dog poster for planning the investigation

- Task sheets (x30)

- Flower templates (x30) – to make flower bun cases

- Colouring pencils, scissors and pritt to decorate flower bun cases

- Timers (x2)

- Thermometers (x2)

- Copy of poem entitled ‘Eating Chocolate’ – obtained from;

New Star Science (2001) Changing Materials: Big Book. Oxford. Ginn.

- Copy of recipe for making rice crispy buns – obtained from;

New Star Science (2001) Changing Materials: Big Book. Oxford. Ginn.




  • Changing materials: melt, hard, soft, runny, solid, liquid, predict, etc.


- Words relating to literacy aspect: describing word, discuss, author, illustrator, etc.

What will happen to the chocolate when it is placed over the hot water?


What have we got to find out?
What will we use to measure time?
How will we record our results?
What other things melt? (ice-cream, ice cube, etc.)

Pupil’s ability to pose and answer questions orally about the investigation taking place.
Can the children predict, giving reasons?
Ability to use resources correctly and make observations/comparisons.
Children’s ability to use a variety of describing words relating to the aspect of melting chocolate.

Teaching Sequence

Literacy Learning Outcomes

Science Learning Outcomes

Key Content

Resources

Key Vocabulary/

Questions

Assessment


6
Building Materials
(Which is the best material for Discovery Dog to use to build his kennel?)

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:


  • Listen to and predict the outcome of the story entitled ‘The Three Little Pigs’.




  • Participate in a shared writing experience in order to plan a science investigation, using the Discovery Dog planning poster.



  • Complete a simple task sheet relating to different animal homes.

Watch a video outlining how house bricks are made (5 mins).

By the end of this lesson, children will have had an opportunity to:


  • Recognise the range of materials that can be used to build homes.




  • Plan a science investigation to find out which material is most suitable for Discovery Dog to use to build his kennel. The children will test a range of materials (i.e. straw, twigs and bricks) using a hairdryer.



  • Record what happened by making comparisons and drawing conclusions.

- Appreciate that house bricks are made from clay that are dried and baked in a very hot oven to make them hard and strong.



Read the storybook entitled ‘The Three Little Pigs’ (for full reference refer to r resource list).
Provide an opportunity for each child to use a hairdryer to test which material is most suitable for a windy night. Remind the children that Discovery Dog needs to know because he wants to build a kennel.
While testing each material - Children will record by attaching a sad or smiley face to a pre-drawn recording sheet.
After discussion allow children to complete a simple activity sheet.
To conclude less sing Old McDonald had a farm.

- Interactive Whiteboard with storybook entitled ‘The Three Little Pigs’ scanned in;

Moore, M. and Hefferan, R. (2001) The Three Little Pigs. Franklin Watts. London.

- Discovery Dog puppet

- Discovery Dog planning poster


- Information Book:

Oliver.C. (2004) I work on a Building Site. Franklin Watts. London.

- Materials - i.e. twigs, straw, bricks.

- Hairdryer


  • Writing and drawing utensils (colouring pencils)

- Recording board/chart to collect results/findings


Words relating to science aspect: strong, hard, soft, stronger, useful for building.
Words relating to literacy aspect: describing word, animal homes.

Why could the wolf not blow down the brick house?


Why are houses made from bricks?
Have the children ever seen a straw house?
Which pig was the most sensible?
What materials do you think would be the best for Discovery Dog to build his kennel with? Remember it’s a dark, windy night.



Ability to complete task sheet.
Ability to plan an investigation in order to find out what material would be the best for Discovery Dog to use to build his kennel.
Are the children confident in predicting before testing the materials,?
Can the children make relevant observations and obtain evidence about the material Discovery Dog should use?
Can the children predict the outcome of the story using cues and knowledge of materials?



Emma Armstrong






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