Teaching the Monster Tale across Genres Narrative Media & Teaching Film



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Camera Movement: how and where the camera will move while recording a shot


  • Pan

  • Tilt

  • Zoom

  • Tracking/Dolly Shot

  • Lighting: the role that light plays in creating a particular effect desired by a director

    • Low-Key Lighting

    • High-Key Lighting

    • Neutral Lighting

    • Bottom/Side Lighting

    • Front Lighting

  • Editing: the methods by which a director chooses to move from one shot to another

    • Fade

    • Dissolve

    • Crosscut

    • Flashback/Flashforward

    • Eye-Line Match

    • Editing Rhythm and Duration

    Scene Viewing Guide (Adapted from Golden’s Film Viewing Notes)



    Scene Title: Edward Eats Dinner with Peg’s Family

    Scene Summary:

    As you watch the scene, jot down significant observations for the following elements of the film:


    Theatrical Elements (costumes, props, sets, acting, etc.)


    Literary Elements (characterization, setting, tone, point of view, irony, dialogue)


    Cinematic Elements (framing, angles, editing, sound, lighting, focus, movement)

    After Viewing: Look back over your notes and explain the intended effect of two of the cinematic elements you noticed. In other words, why did the director choose to use them? How do they relate to the literary events within the scene?

    Scene Viewing Guide (Adapted from Golden’s Film Viewing Notes)


    Scene Title: Peg Welcomes Edward into Her Home

    Scene Summary:

    As you watch the scene, jot down significant observations for the following elements of the film:


    Theatrical Elements (costumes, props, sets, acting, etc.)


    Literary Elements (characterization, setting, tone, point of view, irony, dialogue)


    Cinematic Elements (framing, angles, editing, sound, lighting, focus, movement)

    After Viewing: Look back over your notes and explain the intended effect of two of the cinematic elements you noticed. In other words, why did the director choose to use them? How do they relate to the literary events within the scene?

    Scene Viewing Guide (Adapted from Golden’s Film Viewing Notes)



    Scene Title: Edward Becomes Angry

    Scene Summary:

    As you watch the scene, jot down significant observations for the following elements of the film:


    Theatrical Elements (costumes, props, sets, acting, etc.)


    Literary Elements (characterization, setting, tone, point of view, irony, dialogue)


    Cinematic Elements (framing, angles, editing, sound, lighting, focus, movement)

    After Viewing: Look back over your notes and explain the intended effect of two of the cinematic elements you noticed. In other words, why did the director choose to use them? How do they relate to the literary events within the scene?

    Answer these Questions with a Partner: In terms of the cinematic and literary elements, how are the two sequences similar/different? What has changed/stayed the same from the beginning to the end of the plot? How do the literary and cinematic elements tell you that? How do these scenes relate to the overall theme of Edward Scissorhands?

    By Lauren Tripp

    Day Seven


    Making the Connection to Frankenstein:

    An Introduction to the Socratic Seminar
    Introduction/Purpose

    After completing the actual viewing of Edward Scissorhands, the students have now collected a wealth of information on the horror genre, the dichotomous motifs in the movie and in Frankenstein, the “monster” archetype as it relates to Edward Scissorhands, the visual sequencing of the movie, and the narrative structure of the movie through Freytag’s triangle. In the last two days of this unit, all these elements come together to allow students to effectively participate in a Socratic seminar to synthesize these elements and connect them with their next text, Frankenstein.


    Sunshine State Standards

    LA.A.1.4.4 applies a variety of response strategies, including rereading, note taking, summarizing, outlining, writing a formal report, and relating what is read to his or her own experiences and feelings.

    LA.B.2.4.1 writes text, notes, outlines, comments, and observations that demonstrate comprehension and synthesis of content, processes, and experiences from a variety of media.

    LA.C.1.4.3 uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

    LA.D.2.4.3 recognizes production elements that contribute to the effectiveness of a specific medium.


    LA.E.2.4.7 examines a literary selection from several critical perspectives.
    Objectives


    1. Students will combine the elements learned in previous days’ lessons to create questions for the Socratic Seminar

    2. Students will identify the narrative elements of Freytag’s triangle in regards to Edward Scissorhands

    3. Students will identify the levels of questions for a Socratic Seminar as explained in attached handout

    4. Students will create questions based on those levels


    Preparation

    These last two days are a wrap-up for all that has been discussed in the previous two weeks. As a result, students will be combining a variety of elements to “get the big picture.” The first element they will be required to review is the idea of Freytag’s triangle. Students will get out their handouts from Day Two and complete Freytag’s triangle with regards to Edward Scissorhands. Where was the rising action? Where was the climax? What was the resolution? Was it satisfactory? Did it give you that sense of relief? This will be a whole class activity. At this point, students will also be provided with a plot summary of Frankenstein as a prereading strategy, and also to enable them to make the connections necessary for the following questions.

    Next, we will discuss the concept of a Socratic Seminar. What is it? What will we be discussing? These questions will be answered in lecture format. The following handout will be provided with the different types of questions we will expect to cover in our Socratic Seminar. Students will fill out the blank areas during group discussion.


    Type of Question

    Description

    Example


    Text

    Information found in the text (this means movie for us!)

    Where does Peggy find Edward at the beginning of the movie?

    Reader

    Reader’s/Viewer’s experience, values or ideas (That means you!)

    How is your neighborhood similar/different to Peggy’s neighborhood?

    Other Literature

    Knowledge of other literature (In this case, Frankenstein)

    How does Edward compare to Dr. Frankenstein’s monster?

    Text/Reader

    Combines knowledge of text with reader’s values or ideas

    How did your concept of a “monster” compare with Edward as the “monster” in the movie?

    Text/Other Literature

    Combines knowledge of text with knowledge of other literature (again, Frankenstein)

    What symbols or motifs in the movie connect with the traditional “monster” genre and Frankenstein in particular?

    Reader/World

    Combines reader’s experiences with knowledge of outside world/science

    Should we as a society be allowed to “create” human beings as Edward’s creator did? What other scientific advancements does this remind you of?

    Reader/Other Literature

    Combines reader’s experiences with Frankenstein





    DENSE

    Text/Reader/World or

    Text/Reader/Other Literature

    Combines knowledge of all three areas into one DENSE question






    Three Areas

    Diagram and Chart taken from The English Teacher’s Companion, Jim Burke (p. 249)


    Practice

    Students will split into groups to create their own questions for the Socratic Seminar. Each group will create one question for each category, using their plot narrative models for assistance to make sure they cover all areas of Freytag’s triangle. Students should also include questions based on the visual sequencing, camera angles and motifs and symbols discussed earlier in the unit. Students should have their notes and handouts to help them write these questions.


    Evaluation

    Students will be evaluated on their individual Freytag Triangle models, as well as their group questions for the Socratic Seminar. Questions should fulfill the individual requirements of their categories, as well as the requirements of the parts of the unit covered earlier in the week.

    Day Eight

    Making the Connection to Frankenstein

    The Socratic Seminar

    Introduction/Purpose

    Today’s lesson will allow the students to state their own questions, as well as answer the questions of their peers. The format of the Socratic Seminar will be an Inside/Outside Circle. The students will be able to synthesize what they have learned about the types of questions that are expected in a Socratic Seminar with what they have learned about Edward Scissorhands and the monster/horror genre. This will prepare them for reading Frankenstein in full and their final project after that is completed, which is a research paper combining all these elements.

    Sunshine State Standards

    LA.B.2.4.1 writes text, notes, outlines, comments, and observations that demonstrate comprehension and synthesis of content, processes, and experiences from a variety of media.

    LA.C.1.4.3 uses effective strategies for informal and formal discussions, including listening actively and reflectively, connecting to and building on the ideas of a previous speaker, and respecting the viewpoints of others.

    LA.D.2.4.3 recognizes production elements that contribute to the effectiveness of a specific medium.

    LA.E.2.4.7 examines a literary selection from several critical perspectives.
    Objectives


    1. Students will synthesize the types of questions required with their information from previous days to create Socratic Seminar questions

    2. Students will draw on that same information to answer these questions in an Inside/Outside Circle format

    3. Students will answer questions from all levels of questioning

    4. Students will complete an evaluation form which gives feedback on the process of the seminar itself, as well as self-evaluate their own participation


    Preparation

    The teacher will organize the chairs into two concentric circles. The rules of the Socratic Seminar will be posted as follows (along with any agreed-upon additions from the class):



    1. Come prepared, with your questions, notes and handouts from the rest of the unit.

    2. Be courteous – no put-downs, no sarcasm.

    3. Allow each participant enough time to finish his/her thoughts.

    4. Speak up if no one else is talking – don’t worry about raising your hand!

    5. Be an active listener.


    6. Take notes and be able to summarize the discussion when you are in the outside circle.



    Practice

    The students in the interior circle will speak first, answering half of the questions, at the teacher’s discretion. The exterior circle will take notes while the interior circle is speaking, and then the two circles will switch. Students will be expected to stay on task. The teacher will act as a moderator if needed.

    When all questions have been discussed, or time runs out, the teacher will wrap up the discussion with a few summarizing questions. Students will be expected to complete the evaluation form below.
    Evaluation

    While students are speaking, the teacher will be evaluating them based on these criteria:



    1. Students seek understanding in collaboration with others.

    2. Students ask questions about the text.

    3. Students refer to the text for support.

    4. Students refer to the ideas or words of others.

    5. Students make connections with text and/or between texts.

    Successful participants will incorporate all of these elements. Students will as well fill out an evaluation form that asks for feedback on the process of the seminar itself, as well as a self-evaluation based on the above criteria.


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