Techniques for supervisors



Download 196.56 Kb.
Page1/3
Date conversion09.05.2018
Size196.56 Kb.
  1   2   3









TRAINING
TECHNIQUES FOR SUPERVISORS




















Scenario #1
Trainee George "Clueless" Custer was recruited from the Los Angeles area and has struggled with city geography throughout training. On average, it takes George far to long to respond to addresses most can locate in half the time. Because of this problem, George's training was extended. Despite the best efforts of his last four trainers, George is showing no signs of improvement. All four trainers have approached you and suggested firing George. They fear George will never be able to respond quickly enough to an "officer needs help call" and, as such, is a threat to everybody's safety. What do you do?
Process:

Identify the problem (What exactly are you trying to determine? Does the problem have several components? Does everyone in the group agree with the way the problem has been framed? Take turns thinking out loud. Do some research):













Solutions:
Explore possible solutions (Brainstorm ideas that may contribute to a solution. Justify your ideas to the group. What do you know? What do you not know? ):






















Narrow your solutions (As a group, sort them, weed them and rank them. Give priority to the simplest least costly.):




















Present your solution and be willing to accept feedback from the class.

Scenario #2

At the end of your shift, a trainee tells you she has a personality conflict with her male trainer. She is reluctant to be more specific other than to say the problem is "personal." She also tells you she wants to be reassigned to a female trainer--­someone who she says is more understanding and can provide better training. The male trainer later informs you that he counseled her because of her unwillingness to take charge of a call. The female trainee is in an observation period and is required to handle calls without trainer assistance. The trainer tells you the counseling session was prompted by the fact the trainee stood by idly while another was forced to handle her call. What do you do?

Process:
Identify the problem (What exactly are you trying to determine? Does the problem have several components? Does everyone in the group agree with the way the problem has been framed? Take turns thinking out loud. Do some research):












Solutions:
Explore possible solutions (Brainstorm ideas that may contribute to a solution. Justify your ideas to the group. What do you know? What do you not know? ):



















Narrow your solutions (As a group, sort them, weed them and rank them. Give priority to the simplest least costly.):



















Present your solution and be willing to accept feedback from the class.

Scenario #3
As you are preparing for briefing, trainee Willie "Whistleblower" Whipple asks to speak with you in private. Suddenly, your plans of a $1.99 "Grand Slam" breakfast melts away like a cold wad of grease cast into a sizzling hot deep fryer. He informs you that he is "concerned" about mock training exercises orchestrated by his trainer, Bob "not-to-swift" Jones. In the early morning hours, Smith claims Jones engages a field-training officer in mock pursuits in which Smith says he is forced to dispatch another officer at high speeds through residential streets. Smith claims the exercises are dangerous and, on several occasions, has almost caused an accident. He has complained but the exercises continue. According to Smith, Jones believes "real life" training exercises are the key to any successful training program. What do you do?
Process:
Identify the problem (What exactly are you trying to determine? Does the problem have several components? Does everyone in the group agree with the way the problem has been framed? Take turns thinking out loud. Do some research):












Solutions:
Explore possible solutions (Brainstorm ideas that may contribute to a solution. Justify your ideas to the group. What do you know? What do you not know? ):

















Narrow your solutions (As a group, sort them, weed them and rank them. Give priority to the simplest least costly.):

















Present your solution and be willing to accept feedback from the class.
Scenario #4
While in the office, you receive a call from a female trainee who expresses concern about the behavior of her male trainer. Although she doesn't want to get him in trouble, she says he has a "friend" at a local hospital that he calls frequently. You speak with the trainer and he claims his trainee is an old high school girlfriend who is vengeful because he broke off their relationship years ago to marry the high school prom queen. He denies the accusation that he has a girlfriend at the hospital and maintains he was only away for a few minutes using the second floor restroom. He says he would have told you earlier that his trainee was an "old flame" but it simply slipped his mind. He said she said – What do you do?
Process:
Identify the problem (What exactly are you trying to determine? Does the problem have several components? Does everyone in the group agree with the way the problem has been framed? Take turns thinking out loud. Do some research):












Solutions:
Explore possible solutions (Brainstorm ideas that may contribute to a solution. Justify your ideas to the group. What do you know? What do you not know? ):



















Narrow your solutions (As a group, sort them, weed them and rank them. Give priority to the simplest least costly.):




















Present your solution and be willing to accept feedback from the class.

Scenario #5

You receive a complaint from a citizen who claims two officers were embracing behind an abandoned warehouse. They were seated in a patrol car and parked there for over an hour. The citizen provides you with the car number. You discover the patrol car had been issued to Officer John "Spanky" Lee and trainee Lucy “Loose” McGillicuty that night. When you question Lee about the report, he denies being behind the warehouse or embracing the trainee. When you question the trainee, she reluctantly talks but denies the allegation. What do you do?

Process:
Identify the problem (What exactly are you trying to determine? Does the problem have several components? Does everyone in the group agree with the way the problem has been framed? Take turns thinking out loud. Do some research):












Solutions:
Explore possible solutions (Brainstorm ideas that may contribute to a solution. Justify your ideas to the group. What do you know? What do you not know? ):



















Narrow your solutions (As a group, sort them, weed them and rank them. Give priority to the simplest least costly.):























Present your solution and be willing to accept feedback from the class.
Scenario #6

It is brought to your attention by a trainer that his trainee, Diane "the Dud" Dimples, is struggling in the training program. Along with a series of other problems, Diane has severe accuracy problems, fails to exercise proper judgment, and lacks confidence in decision-making. You and the trainer hold a counseling session with Diane and inform her of the department's expectations. The next day, she calls in and claims she broke her foot skiing. Diane is absent from work for the next week under a doctor's excuse. When Diane returns to full duty, she is again assigned to a trainer on your shift. The next day, the trainee calls in to report that her oldest child is sick and in need of her attention. This time, she is off caring for her sick son for 5 days. On her first day back, Diane comes down with her son's flu symptoms and has to leave work. Diane has now exhausted all of her accrued time off and is absent without pay. It is imperative her training program be completed. What do you do?

Process:
Identify the problem (What exactly are you trying to determine? Does the problem have several components? Does everyone in the group agree with the way the problem has been framed? Take turns thinking out loud. Do some research):












Solutions:
Explore possible solutions (Brainstorm ideas that may contribute to a solution. Justify your ideas to the group. What do you know? What do you not know? ):
















Narrow your solutions (As a group, sort them, weed them and rank them. Give priority to the simplest least costly.):














Present your solution and be willing to accept feedback from the class.

Scenario #7

Over a period of eleven weeks, two competent trainers inform you that they don't believe Trainee Stan "Spam" Stebnisky has the aptitude or ability to complete the training program. During his final weeks of training, he is assigned to trainer Paul "Passum" Pishione, the only trainer available. During Stebnisky's last week of training, you ask Pishione if he thinks Stebnisky is ready to be released from training. You know the answer Passum will give you before you ask but you feel compelled to release Stebnisky. At this point, you realize it's a sink or swim situation for Stebinsky. The following week, the senior and most argumentative officer on the shift, Sam "Stag" Stagnoli, asks to speak with you in private. With a cup of coffee in one hand and a donut in the other, you think you're ready for any challenge Stag or any officer can drum up. You invite him into your office only to be handed a petition signed by the officers on your shift demanding that you get rid of "the Spam." With a look from Stag that could break a stainless steel prison mirror, you realize he and the authors of this fine petition are not in a negotiating mood. What do you do?

Process:
Identify the problem (What exactly are you trying to determine? Does the problem have several components? Does everyone in the group agree with the way the problem has been framed? Take turns thinking out loud. Do some research):












Solutions:
Explore possible solutions (Brainstorm ideas that may contribute to a solution. Justify your ideas to the group. What do you know? What do you not know? ):
















Narrow your solutions (As a group, sort them, weed them and rank them. Give priority to the simplest least costly.):














Present your solution and be willing to accept feedback from the class.

Scenario #8

During briefing, you are about to make an important announcement when suddenly a newly assigned trainee Jack "Lack of HiJean" Jeanius shows up. Jack is 5 minutes late for work and attired improperly. He appears as if he crawled out from under his car and drove straight to work. His jeans are too short, tattered and spotted with grease. He is unshaven, hair uncombed and he smells as if he has not had a bath in over a month. As Jack takes his seat, several employees move away from him and wrinkle their nose. You can smell him and he is sitting in the back row. Department policy clearly requires all employees to wear attire befitting their position in the department and do their utmost to maintain personal hygiene. What do you do?

Process:
Identify the problem (What exactly are you trying to determine? Does the problem have several components? Does everyone in the group agree with the way the problem has been framed? Take turns thinking out loud. Do some research):












Solutions:
Explore possible solutions (Brainstorm ideas that may contribute to a solution. Justify your ideas to the group. What do you know? What do you not know? ):



















Narrow your solutions (As a group, sort them, weed them and rank them. Give priority to the simplest least costly.):

















Present your solution and be willing to accept feedback from the class.


7 P’s of Training


  1. Proper

  2. Prior

  3. Planning

  4. Prevents


  5. Piss

  6. Poor

  7. Performance


TRAINING THROUGH INTIMIDATION

By Randall D. Larson



9-1-1 Magazine (1997)


  • A popular Far Side cartoon depicts a class of young preying mantises gathering eagerly on a leaf. Before them looms their instructor, a large, adult mantis, who informs them: “Of course, long before you mature, most of you will be eaten.”

A dispatch center where I once worked tacked this cartoon up on the wall near the training office, because at that time it reflected the unit’s attitude toward their new recruits.
I was one of them, 13 years ago. I recall that first day, as I sat amid unfamiliar faces, beginning an exciting but vaguely frightening adventure, eager to soak in whatever comprehension I could pack into two hemispheres of cobbled cerebrum, being welcomed into my new career with the encouraging words: “Of course, 60% of your will not last through the end of this academy.”
Gee, thanks for the shot in the arm. Now bash me over the head with that microphone.

While it’s true that there is a significant turnover rate during dispatch academies and ensuing console training, I can’t help but wonder how much damage that discouraging introduction may have caused. Like a self-fulfilling prophecy, being told that the team responsible for your training expects most of you to fail hardly stimulates one to succeed. The implication can be as fatal to the spirit of a trainee striving to succeed as the trainer who constantly badgers and belittles his or her trainee, impatiently criticizing every mistake. I had one of those for a time too, and there were many days early in my training when I seriously considered a move to a less stressful job (navigator on a nuclear submarine, perhaps).

It wasn’t until I rotated to a different shift and was paired with a trainer who radiated encouragement, who gently sought to insure I mastered all those mistakes, who criticized me constructively and built me up, that I really began to excel. Certainly this same trainer failed recruits who couldn’t master the job, but I can’t help but wonder how many potential dispatchers turned in their resignations because their spirits were broken by ruthless criticism or by the consequences of that expectation of failure they’d heard at the very beginning. How many successful careers were cut off at the knees among dispatchers whose confidence was stolen by attitudes that begat failure?
Trainees will make mistakes. And many will indeed not make it to graduation or certification. But that will occur through the course of the training and evaluation process. Is it really necessary to condemn a majority of your bright, eager, highly trainable recruits with the expectation of failure? How much more successful might a training program be if students are not admonished to expect failure, but to breed success?




  1   2   3


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page