That’s Eggscellent

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That’s Eggscellent



Seminars@Hadley
That’s Eggscellent
Presented by

Patti Jacobsen

Lynn Sorge
Moderated by

Dawn Turco


March 5, 2015
Dawn Turco

Welcome to today’s seminar at Hadley that we’ve entitled That’s Eggscellent, and today we are talking everything we can think about related to eggs and as we planned today’s seminar, there’s a lot to cover but I want to kind of stop for a moment before I bring on our presenters and see if this brings back any memories for those of you out there. Let me just play you a little snippet of something. [You should wake up to eggs each day, and then you’ll be on your way with so much energy for your whole family. When you’ve got real big test that you want to be your best, the incredible edible egg. USDA has made the call. Eggs have 14 percent less cholesterol and 64 percent more Vitamin D than they previously thought you see, and we just barely got those lines with the percentages to rhyme, the incredible edible egg.]


That goes on just a little bit more, but does that remind you of anything, folks, especially those of us who remember the ‘70’s and that jingle which has not been modernized. It did make me laugh because it brought back kind of some nostalgia from the ‘70s, but that is from the Incredible Edible Egg website so if – and they actually allow you to have a ringtone in the [inaudible 0:01:44] which personally, I don’t want that playing every time my phone rings but if you do, you can go there.

Again, this is Dawn Turco and I am moderating today’s seminar on eggs. Joining me are Patti Jacobsen and Lynn Sorge and the three of us you may know if you’re repeat participants. We do the seminars quite often related to cooking and food. Yes, we are foodies and we are home cooks and we enjoy organizing and presenting these seminars, and so we’re going to take you down a road all about eggs today. We think it’s going to be fun and informative. When you think about it, the incredible egg can be prepared in so many ways, so many eggscellent ways I might add. You can fry them. You can scramble, bake, hard-boil, poach, microwave. Yes, you can microwave eggs and on top of that, they’re nutritious, readily available and are reasonably priced. So we’re liking the egg today.

Today we will talk about egg facts, about hard-boiling them. There are perfect ways to do that, handling eggs, egg safety. I’m going to talk about deviled eggs, one of my favorite ways to have them but getting us started today, and I will ask Lynn to do her self-introduction. Lynn is going to talk about some egg facts. So Lynn, I’m handing the microphone over to you.
Lynn Sorge

I hope I have the [inaudible 0:03:29]. If not, somebody can interrupt me. The little jingle came through perfectly and what I like about these seminars, when we do our cooking and baking seminars, is that Dawn is our moderator, but she also has lots of good cooking and baking ideas. So she chimes in all along the way. My facts will be kind of a long chat to get us started but then after that, we’ll probably bounce back and forth a little bit.


Chicken eggs come in more colors than white and brown. Now I didn’t know that for a while, except that I was a little farm kid when I grew up. So the different breeds of chickens produced different colors of eggs. So in besides the white and brown ones, you can get blue, blue-green, reddish brown or even speckled and I’m not talking about the malted milk ball ones for Easter. These are the real thing. A great place to try to find these is at a local farmers market, and the color of the shell does not relate at all to nutrient, flavor, quality, cooking characteristics.

White-shelled eggs are produced by hens with white feathers and white ear lobes. Brown-shelled eggs are produced by hens with red feathers and red ear lobes. Now I can’t imagine going around checking out chicken’s ear lobes, but that’s what these facts told me. Brown egg-laying hens usually are slightly larger and require more food, and so that’s why sometimes brown eggs are a bit more pricy than the others. Hens aren’t the only birds that lay edible eggs. You can – duck eggs, quail, emu, goose and ostrich. They all are edible.

You can use water to easily tell the age of an egg and I do this a lot. If you have eggs and you think well, when did I buy those eggs? And you don’t have somebody there to read you any note about it, you fill a bowl with enough water to cover the eggs with about an inch of water and you put them in the bowl. If an egg sticks to the bottom it’s fresh. If it floats to the top it’s not and this happens because as an egg gets older, it develops a larger and larger air pocket in its shell. So it’s actually better to use a less fresh egg if you’re hard-boiling it because in fresh eggs, the white adheres closer to the shell, making it a bit more hard to peel the egg.
If you can’t remember, which does happen to all of us now and then, if an egg is fresh or hard-boiled, now I would do this on perhaps a cafeteria tray on my counter, rather than just the counter. You spin the egg. If it wobbles it’s raw. If it spins easily it’s hard-boiled. However if it goes wobbling off I would prefer it on a tray, rather than it might go wobbling off on a new counter or kitchen floor. Eggs contain like, Dawn was saying, all the essential minerals, vitamins and stuff, except Vitamin C and [inaudible 0:07:18]. Egg yolks are one of the few foods, and we’ll talk quite a bit about this today, that naturally contain Vitamin D as in Dog. Eggs also contain various things for helping the body, something called choline, and that helps with brain development and things like that.

So there are many, many things that will help within eggs. It’s not the stuff. They have more nutrients sometimes than some of our veggies we hear about, spinach and other green vegetables. A whole egg is about three tablespoons worth of liquid. The egg yolk measures about one tablespoon of liquid. Older hens tend to lay bigger eggs, but double-yolked eggs are produced by younger ones whose egg production cycles aren’t quite yet synchronized. They’re – I think this is interesting. There are about 70 calories in an uncooked egg and 77 in a cooked egg because you’re usually going to cook it in a little oil or something like that. China produces the most eggs at about 160 billion per year. In the U.S., about 280 million eggs produce more than 65 – I lost my place. Oh, that – there’s nothing you can do.

So we produce less eggs than China and a hen can lay about 250 eggs per year. I always think that’s interesting to think oh, my goodness, when you’re a little girl on the farm you go out in the chicken house and you know they’re in the nest boxes or in places, and you get those fresh eggs and bring them in and there’s nothing like it. Linda Perry was saying before this seminar began, she could smell somebody cooking bacon and eggs and such. Oh, that’s a lovely smell in the morning. Now I am going to send this off to Patti.
Patti Jacobsen

Good morning, everybody. I was hoping that I was able to hold down the microphone so I could read with one hand and hold the microphone with the other and not have to worry about holding the control key down. I need three hands to do this. Anyway, I am going to talk about the functions of eggs. Now you think an egg is an egg is an egg and boy, they do a lot of different things within recipes, like being emulsifying agents to keep oil suspended in water-based liquids, in foods such as mayonnaise and hollandaise sauce or as foams to add air and give structure to foods like sauce and hard meringues, angel food cake and sponge cake and soufflés and puffy omelets. That’s what I wish I had right now.

As a thickening agent, this is helping in thickening sauces, custards and puddings. As binding agents, so we all know that, well, maybe we don’t all know but you put in egg in meatloaf to hold it together and things like croquettes. As interfering agents and what these do, they interfere with the formation of ice crystals in things like ice cream and other frozen desserts, and then eggs also add structure to baked products such as muffins and cakes. They add important nutrients and just to review a little bit, Lynn has mentioned some of this, but they contain all of the essential amino acids, as well as thiamin, riboflavin, iron, phosphorous and Vitamins A and D as Dog and then another function of adding eggs is to add flavor and color to foods, excuse me, such as custards, puddings and cakes. So there will be a quiz later. No, not really. [laughs]

Another thing that I wanted to talk about is hard-boiling eggs. We all have – I think everybody has a favorite method for hard-boiling eggs and I learned it from my mom and I figure moms know, and so what I do is get a pan that will hold six cold, fresh eggs, maybe not too fresh, maybe about a week old because they peel easier when they’re about a week old. Anyway, put six eggs in a pan. Cover them with cold water and then I turn it on high and I don’t let it boil. I wait until the eggs start kind of jumping around in the pan. They’ll kind of go dah dah dah dah dah dah dah and they’ll kind of vibrate and you can feel the handle and you can feel them vibrate, and that’s when I turn them down to medium and all of this is uncovered by the way and I let it simmer for about twenty-six or seven minutes for six eggs and maybe twenty-two minutes for three eggs, and then I turn it up to high and let it boil.
Oh, I let it boil for about two to three minutes and that hardens the membranes of the eggs a little bit, and it will ultimately make it easier to peel and then after I’ve boiled the eggs, I take them over to the sink and immediately run them under ice cold water, and then you can start peeling them right away. So Lynn, what’s your method?

Lynn Sorge

I think this is so interesting because we all three do it a little differently, and the one I bet you just won’t believe is Dawn. Mine is somewhat different than Patti and I learned it from my mom, too. So I think there are a lot of egg-boiling moms out there. I always put them in a single layer in the pan. So what I do is, if I use a three-quart sauce pan and I want quite a few eggs, I just get as many in there as I can or you know fewer than a two-quart. So then I fill it maybe oh, three quarters of an inch above the eggs, and that’s where you’ll see if you’ve got a really older egg because it might pop up a little bit. I give a good shake of salt into the cold water. Why? Because I don’t know. Some wise tale says it peels them easier so I do it. Then I put it on the stove, put it in high just like Patti does, but mine is covered the entire time. I cover them up, let them rattle around and get a good boil going, really good boil.

So it’s on high and you put it – but you have to watch them because if you don’t, you can boil them over, so if you’ve got a cover on them. So just watch them when they’re rattling around and you know they’re really boiling. I turn off the heat and I let them sit for 22 minutes. I mean you can let them sit for 20. I think it’ll do about the same thing. Then I take them immediately to the sink, lift the lid, making sure to lift it so that the heat is going away from me and pour ice cold water, you know run it over them, fill the pan to the very tippy top, then wait about a minute or two, drain them, fill it with cold water again, and I do that about three or four times, letting the water warm up a bit and then putting cold over it.
Then I, just because I’m you know not wanting to mess around, I put them in my drainer and because they’re still a little warm, within a minute or two, they’ve dried. So then I just put them in a nice bowl or whatever I’m going to into my refrigerator and here’s where I use a little tip. I have cardboard egg cartons and one Styrofoam one in my fridge. So I put any boiled eggs in the Styrofoam one, and that way I know for certain sure and I don’t have to spin it or do anything like that and anything in that Styrofoam box is boiled, hard-boiled. So that’s my method and now you get to hear Dawn.
Patti Jacobsen

Lynn, before we go to Dawn, I just have a question. When you boil your eggs, do they crack because that’s why I don’t boil eggs, and that’s why my mom told me not to boil eggs because they might crack and then the egg kind of poofs down in between the cracks, and then you have a ruined hard-boiled egg.


Lynn Sorge

Actually, once in a while, I would say, every perhaps fourth time that I boil eggs, one might crack but I don’t waste it. I just let it cool down and take that part off and use the rest but it doesn’t happen very often and that’s why it’s better to watch them. Don’t let them go rattling and banging around in the pan for a long, long time. Just get them to a good boil but yes, every now and then one will crack.

Dawn Turco

Well, here we go and oh, Jeannette mentioned her method in the text messaging. So you’ll have to take a read, folks, where she’s doing a let it sit method as well, a variation of that and I’ll be honest with you. I do the let it sit method, too when we were talking in prep. You know my way, once it came to a boil, lid is on, I’d turn the heat off and then I set my timer for 15 minutes. So I find that 15 minutes does it and then you take them to the cold bath, and then actually once I get the water in the pan, the cold water, I actually throw some ice cubes on top, too but the method that was being referred to before and the Food Network. Yes, the Food Network, Jeannette.


This one came up not long ago and I’ll be honest. I have never heard of doing it this way and basically, the method is in the oven, no water involved whatsoever. You preheat the oven to 325. You place the eggs in a muffin tin. That sounds kind of brilliant when you think about it and each muffin spot gets an egg, and you bake them for 25 to 30 minutes and when you bring them out, then you take them to the cold water bath and let them cool after that. So that was completely new to me, and I think there are newfangled ways of cooking that have evolved over time and so I’ll be honest. I haven’t tried that one yet, but I think as I get closer to Easter and I have a lot of eggs to deal with I think I’m going to give that one a go. So those are the many ways and there are more [laughs] if you look online.

I think everybody has their way to do the perfectly boiled egg but as you know, boiled eggs go to becoming deviled eggs and I mentioned at the get-to that I am a big fan of deviled eggs and again, I think it takes me back to a mother memory as a youngster. Of course peeling eggs that have hardboiled was a pretty safe thing for a youngster to do because you know if you destroy one no foul. No pun intended but it was something that I did get to do with my mom and deviled eggs at most people’s family events I think go pretty darn quickly and in my house, I don’t dare put them out at the buffet before time because the plate’s empty before I even start a buffet at a holiday, but they’re great for many occasions and certainly summertime and they’re great to take to potlucks, easy to prepare and not too expensive but you might say okay, how did we ever come up with deviled eggs and where did that name come from? And I tried to find out and to be honest with you, the history of deviled eggs is kind of lost but we have evidence of a kind of deviled egg going back to ancient Roman times.

The Romans would take hardboiled eggs and top them and dip them. So you would have, being you know [inaudible 0:22:12], they would dip their sauce in white vinegar, in honey and they were quite the rage in Roman times. Then I found that you can kind of fast-forward you know a few centuries and let’s see, let’s take it to the 17th Century where the boiled egg became a staple in households it says and – but it was in the 18th Century that the devilling of food became the word and it really wasn’t at first associated with eggs at all. Devilling kind of meant that you were spicing food up, and so I think we just then carried you know like we have devilled ham that has spices in it and it got carried to the devilled egg, and of course that was kind of associated with the heat that is where the devil lives.
So that’s where the idea of maybe that’s its history, but what I love about devilled eggs and as a modern home cook, it’s way beyond that traditional way that we all know of making devilled eggs, and I have even seen it in kind of trendy restaurant appetite list where you can get devilled eggs and you know of course there you’re adding truffle oil or crabmeat or shrimp, or I mean there’s just so much that you can put in with that yolk and put it back in that hardboiled egg half and drizzle on top of it with balsamic vinegar or whatever. You can be so creative.

So – and you always hear us talk about the resource list associated with our cooking seminars. I have put a couple links to places where you can find devilled egg recipes that are a little bit out of the box and I’ll just tease you with one idea before we move on, and I saw a recipe for Tuscan lemon devilled eggs. Now there’s a twist for you and for those of you who are looking for a lighter approach to it because you know we kind of know about the mayonnaise issues.

Patti Jacobsen

Lynn, I was going to ask you – we were talking about questions and answers and we can just maybe continue that but do you remember some information that we got about cubed hardboiled eggs?


Lynn Sorge

Yes, there are ways you can I guess put them you know and try to shape them, so that they’re a little less rolling around. The one thing that I just saw in the food store and I’m curious if any of you have, they now sell hardboiled eggs that are peeled, ready to roll or well, maybe roll’s not a good word here but I would be a little leery. I’d make sure I had somebody check the dates and things on them but you can buy a bag of literally, all the peeling’s gone. So you have your hardboiled egg. All you have to do is bring it home, put it on your salad or make your devilled eggs.


Dawn Turco

And they’re actually quite good. I was leery, too but I shopped with my favorite shopper and as long as you check the expiration dates. Typically, the ones I’ve seen last for about three weeks and I’ve never had any go bad and when I’m really in a hurry and there’s no time to boil any eggs, they are a great substitute. They are a little pricy. So it really becomes a tradeoff.


Dawn Turco

Does anybody have a question about what we’ve talked about so far? Otherwise, we’ll go on.


Caller 1

Hi, I have a question about the methods of hard boiling eggs where you turn off the stove and let the eggs sit. I have an electric stove so the burner would still be hot. When I turn off the burner should I actually take the pan off the hot burner to – when I start the timing to let it finish cooking?


Patti Jacobsen

No, leave it on the stove because the heat is what you want but it’s not boiling.

Lynn Sorge

It’s also handy for a safety issue. I have an electric stove as well and some people say, “Oh, just move it off the heat. It’ll,” no, I agree with Patti but also, it keeps something on that very, very hot burner and by the time you move it then it won’t be so hot. Now with Patti’s method it will be because she boils them up again but if you’re going to just let them sit and rest in a covered pan, by the time you take it off, the burner itself will be cool.

Caller 2

I have a question because I’m a non-cook, several questions but I’ll stick to one. The baking method for hardboiled eggs that Dawn talked about, do you have to buy a certain type of muffin tins to do that? Because some of them, I don’t think you could bake for 25 minutes and still have them in one piece.


Dawn Turco

[laughs] Actually, the [inaudible 0:27:46] pan, like your cupcake size muffin pan, and there’s a recipe that I’ve included on the resource list talked about doing a dozen eggs in a twelve pan, but I’m thinking I usually don’t do a dozen at a time, unless you know it’s a holiday and so I was going to try it with my little cupcake pan that is for six and give it a go. Now I read that you know you can possibly get a little discoloration on the shell, but you know it’s no big deal. So again, I have seen this in multiple places from the Food Network and just [inaudible 0:28:26] I don’t think so. I hope not.



Lynn Sorge

And what is the temperature you put it on, Dawn?


Dawn Turco

Three, twenty-five for about twenty, twenty-five minutes is what I think it said.


Lynn Sorge

I just think that’s a phenomenal recipe. It scares me. I would be afraid the eggs would explode, but if you don’t cook them too long, it must work.

Dawn Turco

You know what I’m guessing, too is 325 is not an awfully hot oven. I just think if it was higher [laughs] it might explode and another tip for you [inaudible 0:28:57] by the way, the resource list. Microwaving a very quick breakfast and I just know you can do this so quickly, too. You could you know in like a coffee, a microwavable-safe coffee mug, you can put eggs in there, a little milk, a little cheese, whip it around with a fork, stick it in the microwave. In about a minute and a half, you’ve got breakfast. I mean how convenient is that for a non-cook?

Patti Jacobsen

One thing I try to do is not walk around with the eggs in my hand. I put them in a custard cup or a dish because you never know when your hand’s going to maybe hit something and the egg goes splat on the floor. I break the eggs in a – on a sharp bowl or the sharp edge of a sink and you can tell whether an egg is bad or good. It won’t smell very good if it’s not very bad and it’s also a little bit more liquidy I believe. When you’re making a recipe, break the eggs into the custard cup before you add them to the recipe so you can feel them or smell them.


In separating an egg, there are egg separators. You can use funnels to let the yolk stay in the funnel and the white drizzle on down out of the egg but I’ll tell you what. When I’m mixing eggs and when I’m separating eggs, I feel the mixture to see if there’s any yolk in it or if the yolk’s still needs to be blended. You really almost do – I know it seems kind of gross but you really almost do have to use your hand to do that.
Lynn Sorge

Patti, this is Lynn and I think I might be getting ahead, but I think I remember in the list of topics that you were going to talk about how you would know before cracking the egg, was it? If the egg is hardboiled or not or was that just before you broke the shell, you could do that little spinning thing because sometimes, especially if you do it in the microwave with one of those gadgets which I’ve tried, you can’t always tell and microwaves are so different now that even if you follow the directions on the device they don’t come out so well.


Patti Jacobsen

Well, first of all, I would do what Lynn said and do a little preventive storing of the eggs and put the hardboiled eggs in the Styrofoam can – carton and the non-hardboiled eggs in the paper carton, and that way you’ll definitely be able to tell but there’s something about and I think Lynn was going to talk about this. You can spin an egg and I – what I don’t know is if it’s spins it’s hardboiled and if it doesn’t it’s fresh or vice versa, and I – that wasn’t on my part of the program and I can’t remember which is which. [laughs] Maybe Lynn’s back.

Lynn Sorge

Yes, I’m back. Yes, you can spin them and if they spin easily then they’re hardboiled. Another thing you can do is you know the stickers you get for kids or the little gold stars for teachers. Once you’ve boiled your eggs and they’re dry, stick a little sticker on anything that’s hardboiled and that will help a lot. I apologize for all of us here about all this goings on with the audio stuff. This is a real challenge. So we are really grateful for those of you that are hanging in there with us.


I wanted to tell you about an omelet in a Ziploc bag. These are so cool. It’s a little like Dawn’s eggs in a mug but this way you boil a pot of water and get it boiling, and then let’s say there are five of you that want omelets. Well, you know if you make them one by one, it takes forever and a year and by the time omelet five is done, person one’s is cold. So this way, somebody who is available writes the names on the egg, Linda, Jeannette, Alice, Patti, Dawn and then each of you, it’s fun, you set up a little bar of ingredients and you can – you put two extra-large eggs in your bag and really whip them up you know so that the yolks are broken and put around in there and then you put whatever you want in the Ziploc bag.

You can put half a cup of grated cheese. You can put a couple of tablespoons of onion or pepper, diced tomato, two tablespoons of broccoli or fresh mushrooms and of course some of us like things like a third of a cup of crab, diced ham, leftover turkey or chicken, okay, and then you kind of whip it around in there, stir it all up, a little salt and pepper to taste, seal the bag. Then when everybody’s are ready, you put them in the boiling water and you keep the water boiling 13 to 15 minutes. Then you turn it off, take it off the stove, drain the water, hand out the bags and do they look pristine all folded over in half? No, but are they wonderful? Kids love it.

If you’ve got a bunch of kiddos over, then it’s so fun to let them make their own eggs in a bag and it – no, the bags don’t melt. No, they don’t pop open. None of that and Patti, I don’t mean to do this [inaudible 0:35:06] and haven’t lost this, I was going to talk about you – about how to know how long to keep eggs. There’s something – again, it’s exciting to help to get this figured out but you can refrigerate eggs up to five weeks after the packing date and on a box of eggs, there is a date and there is a number on it from one to three hundred and sixty-five. So you got to be good about your dates in the time of the year but if it was you know forty something, you know it was packed in February and if it was three hundred and fifty-six, you’d know it was packed in December, and so five weeks after that date it’s safe to use the eggs and I thought that was pretty intriguing to know that that’s on there.
So there’s also a sell by date but not you know, not a packing date that you think to look for, and one more thing I want to get in because I think it’s really important. What about cholesterol? You know first it was oh, don’t eat eggs. Eggs are horrible. They’re terrible for you, you know that kind of thing. Now it’s like maybe they’re not so bad, you know that kind of thing. So I got some info off the Mayo Clinic website because I thought that would be the best way to do it. Most healthy people, according to them, can eat seven eggs a week with no increase in their risk for heart disease and such things like that.

Now one thing you can do is if you love eggs, you make yourself three egg whites and one egg yolk. Just remove the eggs, separate them in that funnel Patti was telling you about and that really helps. Now if you have diabetes, it’s a different story. According to that website and Mayo’s usually pretty reliable, they say that you should have only three egg yolks a week if you’re – and the FDA, Department of Agriculture, also agrees. They have about 155 milligrams of cholesterol and it’s usually a good old regular healthy person, they suggest 300 milligrams a day of cholesterol. Diabetics, 200.

So you have to be really careful but again, this is something I do as a diabetic. I always have three egg whites and one egg yolk if I’m going to do that and of course I don’t do it every day, but it does tell you kind of what the lay of the law is and maybe by now Dawn is back so we can see who’s here and then if she’s not, Patti and I can go on and tell you some other things about fun egg stuff.
Dawn Turco

Indeed I am back [laughs] and listening and the cholesterol issue, you know that was – it’s in the egg yolk. So you know what I see out there is – of course there’s a lot of use of egg whites and then you have the egg substitutes, but one thing I read was talking about you know, it’s not so much the egg that’s bad. It’s what we do with it and put next to it and when you think about the bacon and the hash browns. Maybe that’s where the breakfast goes south and not so much with the egg.


So anyway, I want – I do want to get a couple things in as well and Hannah, thank you for some of these text messages. She was talking about spinning – the spinning egg, if it’s spins it’s hardboiled. She also mentioned adding water makes the omelets a little bit fluffier and I do that, but if I have milk on hand I tend to put a little splash of milk in, instead of the water when I do my scrambled eggs or my omelet. So that’s kind of fun. Let’s see what else is up there. Let’s see, you talked about the dates on the carton, and there’s something that they call candling and this is where the inspectors actually hold the eggs up to a light source and what they’re looking at in there is the size of the air pocket, the condition of the yolk and the white and if there’s any hidden defects and what you’re – they’re doing there is grading the egg.

So it’s not so much the size of the egg. They grade them this way and of course AA is the top quality and then they have Grade A and you see that typically on your cartons of eggs in the supermarket, and the difference between AA and A, you know it’s not a nutritional value thing. It’s other you know it’s just the grade that they put on there and let’s see, I was surprised to learn because I’d been doing this I think wrong the whole time. Most of us I think in our fridges have an area that is seconded to eggs, and mine is a plastic bin which thankfully, I have been keeping away from the types of foods where the egg would absorb the odors in your refrigerator, like maybe onion, garlic and those kinds of smelly things.

So I’ve had them away from that but – and I usually keep them in the egg carton, and that’s one of the tips for egg safety, is to leave the eggs in the original carton to help prevent them from drying out but I read one place where you should also just keep the lid on and this is what I wasn’t doing. I was kind of ripping the lid off, putting the carton in its little bin and calling it a day and I know some refrigerators have a bin on the door, and oftentimes I think the reason that door, they have a little door that comes out down over that bin is to kind of protect it again from the other odors of the refrigerator.
So I thought that was interesting and you should store eggs at 41 degrees and it said with the small end of the shell pointing down in the carton which of course I have never checked, but I think – hopefully, they come that way because I haven’t twisted them around ever. Those are some of the egg safety things that I found. I’m opening up the microphone because I’m totally lost from where we were in our outline.
Patti Jacobsen

One – this is Patti and one thing about storing eggs in the door of the refrigerator, they are nicely covered and everything, but what I heard was the door isn’t quite cold enough as keeping them in their original carton and storing them large end up in a colder part of the refrigerator, and another thing I learned from either Dawn or Lynn was that when you buy Egg Beaters, you can buy them – I thought they were just egg but you can buy them with cheese and seasonings and chives and all kinds of things to prepare different things.

Dawn Turco

Lynn, we have a question related to your cooking in a Ziploc bag and the question is does it matter if it’s a regular or freezer bag and what size Ziploc did you use? That’s one question. Where are the most nutritious parts of the egg, the egg yolk or the white? I don’t know the answer to that one. Sorry, folks, but it’s out there. Somebody does. I’m letting go of the mic.

Lynn Sorge

I think it depends you know, there’s a lot in the egg yolk that is good but then there’s also the concern of how many egg yolks you consume so I use a sandwich bag. I don’t think it would really matter but a quart. You don’t need anything that big but use a Ziploc sandwich bag, and I use the zipper ones because I have a lot of arthritis issues with my hands and trying to seal those things, I just zip them across and it works just fine. I, like Dawn, put a little milk in there and the recipe for eggs in a bag is on the resource list.




Caller 3

Ladies, do either of you have tips for cooking over-easy eggs?


Dawn Turco

I’ll be honest with you. I don’t like runny eggs so I break my yellows up and [laughs] cook that if I’m frying an egg, and I’m curious if either of you use the egg rings that are out there.


Patti Jacobsen

I don’t use it. Excuse me, I don’t use an egg ring. When I fry an egg, I crack the egg in a heated skillet that I have butter in and crack the egg, and then I pour a just maybe a tablespoon of water in it and it kind of helps steam the egg but it’s not enough to keep it from frying and I cover it, turn it off and let it sit for about three minutes and if you have a good nonstick pan, the egg is very easy to just slip out of the pan.


I have not used the egg rings but I know a lot of people like them and it used to be that they recommended that you use tuna fish cans but the tuna cans now you know, they said that you would take the bottom and the top out of the tuna cans but tuna cans now have kind of a rounded bottom that you can’t really get off with a can opener. So you might have to find some other type of can. I’m trying to think what it would be. Maybe Lynn, you might know.

Lynn Sorge

There really are egg rings out there but I, like the two of you, don’t use them. I used to in my youth and so then the tuna cans were great. You just go in the store and hopefully, like canned chicken or something you find a little – even like a flat can of pineapple you know a littler can, you hope to find a brand where that bottom will be able to be taken off but there are truly egg rings. I too, I don’t put water in mine, but as Dawn was saying, here’s what happens with the egg. You put a little butter in there, there the calories fill up but that’s what I do, and I put a cover on them and I let them cook a little bit and then very lightly, as a blind cook, I lift the – I hope I still am on. I lift the lid and very carefully, touch the yolk and that way you can feel how hard it is if that’s how you want to do them, but like Dawn, I do not like runny eggs. So I don’t tend to do that.

Dawn Turco

We had a question and I posted it to the group and got no answer. The question is, what herbs go well with eggs, other than rosemary, and that’s a very good question you know if you’re making eggs ranchero and you’re doing something with salsa. You know I would think some cilantro might go in there or so, but I’m not a big herby user with eggs. So I was hoping the group would have some comments and I see nothing. Be thinking, guys. I’m letting go of the mic. We’re coming to the end. So I want to hand it back to Lynn and Patti for some final thoughts and a goodbye before we officially close down today.


Lynn Sorge

I wanted to let everybody know about the different kinds of herbs. I like to use any kind of Italian type herb, oregano, thyme, sage, parsley, cilantro. They’re all great. I especially like garlic and onions with my eggs.


Dawn Turco

Excellent and I too love the mushrooms which is not an herb but I love the mushrooms in with my egg concoctions.


Patti Jacobsen

Well, I just want to thank all of you for coming today and oh, you’ve had great questions and sorry we had some technical difficulties but we stuck together and prevailed.

Lynn Sorge

I wanted to just say a couple of things. I figure they’ll take out those long pauses right there. There’s nothing. So Easter’s coming and one thing, don’t forget, some of you who’ve been around a while, The Golden Egg Book. It’s a wonderful book for little guys and it’s been around a long time so it’s a fun one to read. Also, you – if you’re not into decorating eggs with just Easter egg dyes, because you’re totally blind, two things, get your eager beaver kiddos in there and they’ll make a big mess. They’ll cover up your table with newspapers but they can get the colors going right, or use other things like sticky wax that would go on them or little felt pieces or like I was telling you, stickers, leaves, stars, little critters and stick them on the eggs, so that something besides just dye is part of what you’re doing.

Another project to do with kiddies, little kiddies is get a bunch of those plastic eggs and let them help fill them before Easter. Get various little chocolate foil-covered eggs, jelly jeans. Oh, by the way, a wren’s egg is as small as a jellybean, a little baby jellybean. So get jellybeans, little malt ball eggs, any kind of little Eastery candy, M&M’s in Easter colors and let the kids fill the eggs. Now not stuff them full but a little candy in each one and then get little special pieces of paper with a letter, H, A, P, P, Y and put each letter in one of the eggs, Happy Easter and so let’s say, you had our dozen eggs that you’re going to hide. Among them, the kids can look and put Happy Easter out on the table when they find the right eggs and put them in order.
So first, they help you fill them, put them in a great big basket. Easter morning it’s the adult’s job to go hide them and then the kids can get little pails or little baskets or little bowls or whatever and go get these eggs, and then they get to keep the candy in them and have fun doing the Happy Easter with the egg.
Dawn Turco

Thanks for that, Lynn. Hannah added a note and I want to get it in. It’s so cute that her husband, because many mothers did this I think, grew up where eggs – adding the egg into the toast, you know where you cut out the circle, put the toast in the skillet, cut out the circle and then you drop the egg into the circle, and of course nowadays, we’ve got cookie cutters of every possible size and you can take a heart cookie cutter and cut it out in the toast and make a heart egg or a shamrock this time of year, a star. So you can really have some fun with the egg and the toast approach. That’s a fun, historical one, too. A lot of nostalgia here today.

It is time to bring our seminar to a close so there’s one last unanswered question and that is, what was first, the chicken or the egg? Wow. How many times have we heard that one? And I saw one suggestion online that is pointing it back to the Bible and it says, according to the Bible, the chicken came first, and this is in Genesis where God created the great creatures of the sea and every living and moving thing with which the water [teems 0:52:10] according to their kind and every winged bird according to its kind and God saw that it was good.

God blessed them and said, “Be fruitful in increasing number and fill the water in the seas and let the birds increase on the earth.” [chuckles] So one potential answer to that question, “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Go to Genesis. Thank you, everyone for participating today. We’ve had a lot good dialogue going on in the text box and of course, Patti and Lynn, I always have such fun with our food-related seminars. So thank you for the work you put in organizing for today.
This recording will be in the past seminar’s space on our website. If you want to go back and revisit it or recommend it to a friend, just go to the Hadley website at Hadley.edu and go – and follow links that say Past Seminars and you will find it there in a day or two, along with the resource list that we have referred to. We got googobs of good links and recipes. A lot of folks have around Hadley and we presenters’ added recipes to that resource list. So you might want to go take a peek and maybe download it and thank you. Yes, we’ve had an eggscellent time today and we hope you have, too. Thank you for joining us and I’ll say officially farewell.
[End of Audio – 0:53:47]


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