The Ant and the Grasshopper Setting



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The Ant and the Grasshopper

 


Setting:

This story takes place on forest floor.

 

Cast of Characters:

Narrator

Grasshopper

Ant

 

Narrator:    On a beautiful summer day a grasshopper sat and sang a sweet song. The grasshopper saw an ant working hard carrying grain to his house.



 

Grasshopper:   Look at that silly ant.  All day long he works hard and never enjoys the sunshine.

 

Narrator:       The grasshopper laughed at the ant and then he continued his song. He basked in the warm sun all summer long without a care in the world.



As summer turned to autumn the grasshopper continued to sing his song and enjoy the sunshine. The ant, on the other hand, continued to gather food and store it in his house.

                    When winter came the cold winds blew hard and the snow covered the meadow with a thick blanket of white. The grasshopper tried to find food, but of course he found nothing. It didn't take long for the grasshopper to knock upon the ant's door and beg...

 

Grasshopper:  Please help me!  I have nothing to eat!  I shall starve without your help.



 

Ant:               My dear Mr. Grasshopper, all summer long I worked hard carrying food to my home while you played in the sunshine.  I will not share my food with someone who is so lazy.

 

Grasshopper:  I was busy singing my song.  I was making beautiful music.  What should I do now?



 

Narrator:   The ant thought for a moment and then said...

 

Ant:          I suggest you dance.



 

Narrator:   And the moral of this fable is...

 

 

 



 

The Tortoise and the Hare

Setting:

This story takes place in a forest with a race course that is a path that goes through the woods.

 


Cast of Characters:

Narrator


Hare

Tortoise


Starter

 

Narrator: Once there were a tortoise and a hare. The tortoise was slow and careful. The hare did everything fast. He loved to brag about his speed.



 

Hare: I am so fast! I have never been beaten in a race. There isn’t anyone who can beat me! In fact, no one is brave enough to try.

 

Tortoise: I am brave enough. I will race you.



 

Hare: You! That is a fine joke. I could run circles around you and still win the race!

 

Tortoise: You should save your bragging until you’ve won.



 

Hare: Let’s race then!

 

Narrator: The tortoise and the hare agreed on a race course. They would race on the path that led through the woods. All the animals lined up to watch.



 

Starter: Quiet! Quiet! It is time for the race. You know the rules. The first to cross the finish line is the winner. Tortoise, are you ready?

 

Tortoise: Yes, I am.



 

Starter: Hare, are you ready?

 

Hare: Of course! This will be a quick race!



 

Starter: On your marks. Get set. GO!



 

Narrator: The tortoise got off to a steady start. The hare left a trail of dust as he races off down the path.

 

Tortoise: Oh, dear! Look at the hare go. I shouldn’t have been so brave. But there is no going back., only forward.



 

Narrator: The tortoise plodded on. Hardly lifting his head to look down the path. Meanwhile, the hare stopped to look back at the tortoise. He waited and waited but didn’t see him.

  

Hare: This is too boring. I think I’ll take a bit of a nap. That tortoise won’t be along for hours.


 

Narrator: The tortoise plodded on. The hare slept on. Finally, the tortoise neared the finish line. His animal friends began to cheer.

 

Hare: What? What is all that noise? It must be time to finish the race.


 

Narrator: But it was too late for the hare. The tortoise crossed the finish line just as the hare came around the last turn. As the animals cheered the tortoise had only one thing to say to the hare.

 

Tortoise: The moral of this story is...



 

 

 



 

 

The Boy Who Cried Wolf

 

Setting:

This story takes place outside of a town in a pasture.

 

Cast of Characters:

Narrator


Boy

Villager One

Villager Two

Villager Three

 

Narrator: Once a young boy tended sheep at the foot of a mountain near a dark forest. He was a good boy, but he got lonely on that mountain. One day, he thought of a plan so that he could have a bit of company and a little excitement.



 

Boy: I know what I’ll do! I’ll run toward the village raising the alarm that a wolf is after the sheep. People will come up to help. The wolf will be gone, but I’ll have some fun on this boring day.

 

Narrator: So the boy ran toward the village.



 

Boy: Help! Help! Wolf! Wolf!

 

Narrator: Several of the villagers came running to meet him. They ran to the flock of sheep but decided the wolf must have run off.



 

Villager One: The wolf must be gone. We’ll go back to work, but take care, now.

 

Villager Two: And call us if another wolf comes.



 

 

Villager Three: We don’t want you to lose any sheep!

 

Narrator: A few days later the boy got bored again. He decided to try the same trick and ran toward the village.


 

Boy: Help! Help! Wolf! Wolf!

 

Narrator: Again, several of the villagers came running to meet him. They ran to the flock of sheep but again decided the wolf must have run off.


 

Villager One: Well, you are lucky again.

 

Villager Two: But how could a wolf get away so quickly?



 

Villager Three: Be watchful, son, but be sure there really is a wolf. We are busy people you know.

 

Narrator: The villagers returned to their work, but shortly after this a real wolf did come out of the forest. It began to stalk the sheep, and the boy couldn’t chase it off. The boy ran toward the village.



 

Boy: Help! Help! Wolf! Wolf!

 

Villager One: I am tired of that boy calling out when there is no wolf.



 

Villager Two: Does he think we are stupid?

 

Villager Three: I’m not going to be made a fool of again. I’m staying right here.



 

Narrator: And so the wolf had a good meal with the boy’s flock. The boy learned too late that:

 

 

The Adventures of Mouse Deer (Mouse Deer and Tiger)



Setting:

This story takes place in a forest.

 

Cast of Characters:

Narrator 1, 2, 3, 4

Tiger

Mouse Deer



 

Narrator 1:  In this story, Mouse Deer meets one of his most dangerous enemies. This story is called,

Mouse Deer:  (brightly, to audience) Mouse Deer . . .

Narrator 1:  and

Tiger:  (ferociously, to audience, showing claws). . . Tiger.

Mouse Deer:  (to audience) Ready to sing? (Drawing out the first note to help them join in)

I’m quick and smart as I can be. 
Try and try, but you can’t catch me!

(Keeps humming the tune softly to himself)

Narrator 1:  Mouse Deer sang his song as he walked through the forest.

Narrator 4:  He was looking for tasty fruits and roots and shoots.

Narrator 2:  Though he was small, he was not afraid. He knew that many big animals wanted to eat him.

Narrator 3:  But first they had to catch him!

Narrator 1:  Then he heard something.

Tiger:  Rowr!

Mouse Deer:  (gasps)

Narrator 4:  There was Tiger!

Tiger:  (sounding sinister) Hello, Mouse Deer. I was just getting hungry. Now you can be my lunch.

Narrator 2:  Mouse Deer didn’t want to be lunch. He looked around and thought fast.

Narrator 3:  He saw . . . a mud puddle.

Mouse Deer:  (makes a face like he’s thinking hard, then brightens, turns to TIGER) I’m sorry, Tiger. I can’t be your lunch. The King has ordered me to guard his . . . pudding.

Tiger:  (uncertainly) His pudding?

Mouse Deer:  (pointing) Yes. There it is.

Narrator 1:  Mouse Deer pointed to the mud puddle.

Mouse Deer:  It has the best taste in the world. The King doesn’t want anyone else to eat it.

Narrator 4:  Tiger looked longingly at the puddle.

Tiger:  (struggling with himself, knowing he shouldn’t ask but wanting it badly) I would like to taste the King’s pudding.

Mouse Deer:  Oh, no, Tiger! The King would be very angry.

Tiger:  (pleading) Just one little taste, Mouse Deer! The King will never know.

Mouse Deer:  Well . . . all right, Tiger. But first let me run far away, so no one will blame me.

Tiger:  All right, Mouse Deer, you can go now.

Narrator 2:  Mouse Deer ran quickly out of sight.

Tiger:  (delightedly, to audience) Imagine! The King’s pudding!

Narrator 3:  He took a big mouthful.

Tiger:  (puts a handful in his mouth, freezes in surprise, then makes a horrible face and spits the mud out toward audience) Phooey!

Narrator 3:  He spit it out.

Tiger:  Yuck! Ugh! Bleck! That’s no pudding. That’s mud!

Narrator 1:  Tiger ran through the forest.

Tiger:  Rowr!

Narrator 4:  He caught up with Mouse Deer.

Mouse Deer:  (gasps)

Tiger:  (fuming) Mouse Deer, you tricked me once. But now you will be my lunch!

Narrator 2:  Mouse Deer looked around and thought fast.

Narrator 3:  He saw . . . a wasp nest in a tree.

Mouse Deer:  (thinks hard, then brightens) I’m sorry, Tiger. I can’t be your lunch. The King has ordered me to guard his . . . drum.

Tiger:  His drum?

Mouse Deer:  (pointing) Yes. There it is.

Narrator 1:  Mouse Deer pointed to the wasp nest.

Mouse Deer:  It has the best sound in the world. The King doesn’t want anyone else to hit it.

Tiger:  (struggling with himself) I would like to hit the King’s drum.

Mouse Deer:  Oh, no, Tiger! The King would be very angry.

Tiger:  Just one little hit, Mouse Deer! The King will never know.

Mouse Deer:  Well . . . all right, Tiger. But first let me run far away, so no one will blame me.

Tiger:  All right, Mouse Deer, you can go now.

Narrator 4:  Mouse Deer ran quickly out of sight.

Tiger:  (to audience) Imagine! The King’s drum!

Narrator 2:  He reached up and hit it.

Narrator 3:  Pow.

All Narrators:  Bzzzzzzzzzzzzz. (Each NARRATOR keeps buzzing when not speaking.)

Narrator 1:  The wasps all flew out. They started to sting Tiger.

Tiger:  Ouch! Ooch! Eech! That’s no drum. That’s a wasp nest!

Narrator 4:  Tiger ran away. But the wasps only followed him!

Tiger:  Ouch! Ooch! Eech!

Narrator 2:  Tiger came to a stream. He jumped in—splash!—and stayed underwater as long as he could.

Narrator 3:  At last the wasps went away.

All Narrators:  (fade out with buzzing)

Narrator 1:  Then Tiger jumped out.

Tiger:  Rowr!

Narrator4:  He ran through the forest till he found Mouse Deer.

Mouse Deer:  (gasps)

Tiger:  (enraged) Mouse Deer, you tricked me once. You tricked me twice. But now you will be my lunch!

Narrator 2:  Mouse Deer looked around and thought fast.

Narrator 3:  He saw . . . a cobra! The giant snake was coiled asleep on the ground.

Mouse Deer:  (thinks hard, then brightens) I’m sorry, Tiger. I can’t be your lunch. The King has ordered me to guard his . . . belt.

Tiger:  His belt?

Mouse Deer:  (pointing) Yes. There it is.

Narrator 1:  Mouse Deer pointed to the cobra.

Mouse Deer:  It’s the best belt in the world. The King doesn’t want anyone else to wear it.

Tiger:  (struggling with himself) I would like to wear the King’s belt.

Mouse Deer:  Oh, no Tiger! The King would be very angry.

Tiger:  Just for one moment, Mouse Deer! The King will never know.

Mouse Deer:  Well . . . all right, Tiger. But first let me run far away, so no one will blame me.

Tiger:  All right, Mouse Deer, you can go now.

Narrator 4:  Mouse Deer ran quickly out of sight.

Tiger:  (to audience) Imagine! The King’s belt!

Narrator 2:  He started to wrap it around himself. The cobra woke up.

Narrator 3:  Ssssssssssssss. (keeps hissing)

Narrator 1:  It didn’t wait for Tiger to finish wrapping.

Narrator 4:  It wrapped itself around Tiger.

Narrator 2:  Then it squeezed him and bit him.

Narrator 3:  Sstt! Ssssssssssssss. (keeps hissing)

Tiger:  Ooh! Ow! Yow! That’s no belt. That’s a cobra! (into the distance) Help! Mouse Deer! Help!

Narrator 3:  (fades out with hissing)

Narrator 1:  But Mouse Deer was far away.

Narrator 4:  And as he went, he sang his song.

Mouse Deer:  (to audience)

I’m quick and smart as I can be. 
Try and try, but you can’t catch me!

 


The Maid and the Milk Pail

 

Setting:

A county road

 

Cast of Characters:

Milk maiden

First stranger

Second stranger

Third stranger

Fourth stranger

Fifth stranger

 

First stranger: Where are you going, maiden, with that pail of milk on your head?



 

Milk maiden: I am going to market to sell my milk, and with the money, I am going to buy three hundred eggs.

 

First stranger: Good luck!



 

Milk maiden: Thank you.

 

Second stranger: Where are you going, maiden, with that pail of milk on your head?



 

Milk maiden: I am going to market to sell my milk, and with the money, I am going to buy three hundred eggs and those three hundred eggs will become three hundred chickens.

 

Second stranger: Good luck!



 

Milk maiden: Thank you.

 

Third stranger: Good luck to you!



 

Milk maiden: Thank you, stranger.

 

Fourth stranger: Where are you going, maiden, with that pail of milk on your head?



 

Milk maiden: I am going to market to sell my milk for money, and with the money, I will buy three hundred eggs that in time will become three hundred chickens. Then I will sell the three hundred chickens for a pretty new gown to wear to the Christmas party!

 

Fourth stranger: Good luck to you!                         



 

Milk maiden: Thank you, stranger.

 

Fifth stranger: Where are you going, woman, with that pail of milk on your head?


 

Milk maiden: I am going to market to sell my milk for money, and with the money, I will buy three hundred eggs that in time will become three hundred chickens. Then I will sell the three hundred chickens for a pretty new gown to wear to the Christmas party!

 

Fifth stranger: Well, you certainly have many plans.



 

Milk maiden: Yes, I do! And when I am at the Christmas party and all the guests ask “Is that a new dress?” I will shake my head “Yes!” I will shake my head just like this!



(Shakes her head and the milk pail falls to the ground.) Oh no, my milk spilt!

 

First stranger: The moral of this fable is this..




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