The following text is taken from the book Fair, Brown, and Trembling: An Irish Cinderella Story, by Jude Daly. It is an adaptation of the Irish folktale “Fair, Brown, and Trembling.”



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The following text is taken from the book Fair, Brown, and Trembling: An Irish Cinderella Story, by Jude Daly. It is an adaptation of the Irish folktale “Fair, Brown, and Trembling.”

Once upon a time, high among the green hills of Erin, there stood a castle. In it lived a widower and his three daughters: Fair, Brown, and Trembling. Fair and Brown always wore new dresses to church on Sundays. Trembling stayed at home. “You must do the cooking,” said her sisters. But the real reason they would not let her out of the house was because Trembling was very beautiful, and they were terrified she would marry before they did.

One Sunday morning, when Fair and Brown had gone to church, the old henwife came into the kitchen. “It’s at church you ought to be, young woman!” she said. “How can I?” said Trembling. “I have only these old clothes. And what if my sisters were to see me there? They’d never let me out again!” “Well,” said the henwife, “you’ve always been kind to me, so now I’ll give you a dress finer than they have ever seen. What will you have?” Trembling thought this was a splendid game. “Oh,” she said, “a dress as white as snow—and green shoes for my feet.” The henwife clipped a piece from Trembling’s old dress. Then, putting on her cloak of darkness, she muttered some strange words…and the next moment, she was holding out a lily-white gown and the prettiest pair of shamrock-green shoes you ever did see!

Trembling couldn’t believe her eyes. She laughed with delight. Then she dressed herself in her beautiful new clothes. When she was ready, the henwife led our outside, where a milk-white mare stood saddled and waiting.

“A word of warning,” said the old woman. “Do not go inside the church door. And the moment the service finishes, ride home as fast as the mare will carry you!” Trembling thanked her. Then she climbed on the mare’s back and rode off.

In church that morning, everyone kept turning around to stare at the beautiful young woman standing in the doorway. As soon as Mass ended, Trembling hurried away. Some of the young men tried to overtake her as she rode off, but in vain. Trembling outstripped the wind as she galloped home on her milk-white mare.

The henwife had dinner all ready, and by the time her sisters came home, Trembling was back in her old clothes. “Have you any news?” asked the henwife. “Indeed,” they replied. “We saw such a fascinating woman at the church door! All the men—from the king down to the poorest beggar—wanted to meet her. Her dress was unlike any we have ever seen. Fair and Brown were impatient to find a dress just the same—but such fine cloth was nowhere to be found in the land of Erin.

The next Sunday, when Fair and Brown had gone to church, the henwife came in and asked, “Will you go to church today?” “I would,” replied Trembling, “if only I could.” “What will you wear?” said the henwife. “Oh, the finest black satin,” answered Trembling,” with scarlet shoes.” “And what color shall the mare be?” asked the henwife. “So black and glossy that I can see myself in her coat,” said Trembling. Once more, the henwife put on her cloak of darkness…and, the next moment, she held out a rippling black gown and red shoes to Trembling.

In church, everyone was curious to know who the woman in black at the church could be. But just as before, Trembling slipped away at the end and was home before any man could stop her. The henwife had dinner ready, and Trembling was back in her old clothes when her sisters got home. “What news today?” asked the henwife. “We saw the strange woman again,” they said, “and none of the men noticed our dresses—they were all too busy gazing at her!” Fair and Brown hunted high and low for a black dress just the same—but such finery was not to be found the length and breadth of Erin.

When the third Sunday came, Trembling asked the henwife for a dress with a snow-white bodice and rose-red skirt, and a cape of mossy green. She wore a hat trimmed with red, white, and green plumes, and on her feet were little blue slippers. That morning, she rode a white mare decorated with blue and gold diamonds.

By now, news of the mysterious young woman had spread far and wide. Princes from north, south, east, and west crowded into the church, each hoping for her hand in marriage.

The Mass ended, and Trembling was already up on her mare, ready to race away ahead of the wind. But the Prince of Emania, who had stayed outside the church during the service, reached out as she passed by and pulled off her slipper. Trembling rode home faster than ever. When her sisters came home, she was back in her old clothes, hard at work. “And what news today?” asked the henwife. “Today,” said the sisters,” the strange woman came to the church again. Her dress was even more splendid than before—and such colors! She is the most beautiful woman ever seen in Erin.”

The Prince of Emania made an announcement. He proclaimed that he would marry the lady whose foot fitted the slipper, whoever she might be. But all the other princes wanted to marry the mysterious woman, too. “Let us fight for her,” they said. “Very well,” replied the Prince of Emania. “But first we must find her.”

They traveled all over the land, searching. Many hopeful ladies tried on the little blue slipper. Yet, though it was neither too large nor too small, somehow it never quite fit. One woman even cut a bit off her big toe—but it was no use.

When Fair and Brown heard about the princes’ search, they spoke of nothing else. And when Trembling said, “Maybe it’s my foot that the slipper will fit,” they jeered, “How stupid you are!” Still, when they heard that the princes were coming to their house, they locked Trembling in a cupboard. The Prince of Emania with his companions came and offered the slipper to each sister in turn. They tried and tried, but it would not fit. “Are there any other young women in the house?” asked the prince. “There is one,” cried a faint voice from the cupboard. “Oh, her,” said the sisters. “We just keep her to clean up the ashes.” But the princes refused to leave until Trembling had tried on the slipper. So, unwillingly, the two sisters let Trembling out. She took the little blue shoe and slipped it on her foot. It fit perfectly!

The Prince of Emania gazed at Trembling, and said, “Yes, it was you I saw outside the church,” and everyone agreed that she was the mysterious woman. “But now we must fight for her,” said the other princes. They went outside. A prince from Lochlin stepped forward, and the struggle began—and what a terrible struggle it was! They fought for nine hours, before the prince from Lochlin gave up his claim and left the field. The next day, a Spanish prince fought for six hours before yielding his claim. On the third day, a Zulu prince fought for six hours, then retired, defeated. But on the fourth day, no more princes came forward, and it was decided that Trembling should become the Prince of Emania’s bride.

So the Prince and Trembling were married. In time they had fourteen children, and they lived ever after in great happiness. As for Fair and Brown…they were put out to sea in a barrel with provisions for seven years—and were never seen again!


UNIT LESSON PLAN

INSTRUCTOR_______________ DATE___________ CLASS LEVEL _ABE Level C______

Fair, Brown, and Trembling Unit: 5 days

Topic: March- St. Patrick’s Day

Fair, Brown, and Trembling- an Irish Cinderella Story

Lesson Objectives:

  1. Gain a deeper understanding of fiction literature (folktale genre) through collaboration with peers

  2. Analyze the text through in-depth reading, text-dependent questions, study of vocabulary, and discussion of cultural implications in a story

  3. Compare and contrast the Irish folktale with traditional understandings of the Cinderella story

  4. Make a bar graph based on student information

CCR Standards Aligned to this Lesson:

RI/RL.4.1 , RI/RL.5.1, RI.4.3, RL.5.4, RI.4.5 , SL.5.1 , SL.5.2 , L.5.5, L.4.4 & 5.4




Reading: text dependent questions and reading strategies, as well as vocabulary, sentence structure, literary elements, and genre characteristics

Vocabulary: henwife, beautiful, shamrock, fascinating, terrified, delight, impatient, cloak, outstrip, scarlet, breadth, mysterious, proclaim, jeer, defeated

Sentence structure: Structure of conversations- quotation marks, other features of a dialogue


Literary Elements: protagonist, antagonist, setting, conflict, climax, resolution

Genre: Common elements of a fairytale.


Text Dependent Questions Possible Student Answers

Who is the protagonist in the story? Who is the antagonist?

A protagonist is the leading character or one of the major characters in a drama, movie, novel, or other fictional text.. The protagonist is Trembling. An antagonist struggles against, is opposed to, and is the enemy of the protagonist in a drama, movie, novel, or other fictional text. Fair and Brown, Trembling’s sisters, are the antagonists.

Based on the first paragraph, describe the conflict of the story.

The conflict of the story is that Trembling wants to go to church, but her sisters will not let her go because they are afraid that she’ll find a husband before they do. Lines 4-7: “Fair and Brown always wore new dresses to church on Sundays. Trembling stayed at home. “You must do the cooking,” said her sisters. But the real reason they would not let her out of the house was because Trembling was very beautiful, and they were terrified she would marry before they did.”

What is the role of the henwife in the story? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

The henwife, who was in the role of a fairy godmother, helped Trembling go to the church by magically transforming her (lines 10-15; 29-33). The story states that the henwife "put on the cloak of darkness"; she would wish for things and they magically appeared, possibly suggesting that the henwife is a witch (lines 13 and 33). It is interesting to note that even though the henwife encouraged Trembling to go to church, she didn't go to church herself.


Compare and contrast the description of Trembling’s outfit and her mare in lines 12-17 and lines 30-33.

In lines 12-17, she has a dress as white as snow and green shoes. The henwife clipped a piece from Trembling’s old dress. A milk-white mare stood saddled and waiting.

In lines 30-33, she has a dress of the finest black satin with scarlet shoes. She has a mare “so black and glossy that I can see myself in her coat.”



Her outfits and her horse are completely opposite in color and style on the first and second day she goes so the church, but she continues to ask for a dress and a horse for each appearance.

Describe the significance of Trembling’s shoes being “shamrock green” in line 15.


A shamrock is a green-leaf clover that originates in Ireland. The description of the shoe relates to the setting of the story, which is among the green hills of Erin, a town in Ireland. It shows that even her clothes are culturally important to the story.

What is the meaning of “outstripped” in line 23?


It means to move faster than something. Trembling “outstripped” the wind, which implies that she moved faster than the wind on her horse.

How does the henwife help Trembling to keep the secret of her identity?

In lines 24-25 and 35-36, the henwife had dinner all ready, and gets Trembling back in her old clothes. She asks, “Have you any news?” to Fair and Brown so that she appears unaware of the events happening,


Why are Fair and Brown jealous of the “strange woman” in lines 37-38? What do they do to try to imitate her?

They are jealous because none of the men noticed their dresses because they were all too busy looking at Trembling. Fair and Brown hunted high and low for a black dress just the same—but such finery was not to be found the length and breadth of Erin. (lines 38-39).


How has Trembling’s appearance changed its effect on the other characters in the story by lines 43-44?

People are curious about her identity after her first appearance and try to find out who she is, but no one is persistent. After her second appearance, Princes from north, south, east, and west crowded into the church, each hoping for her hand in marriage because of her beauty.


What is the climax of the story? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

The climax is when the Prince of Emania pulled off Trembling’s slipper as she rode away from church. But the Prince of Emania, who had stayed outside the church during the service, reached out as she passed by and pulled off her slipper (lines 46-47).


How do the women in the story respond to the princes’ search for the woman whose foot will fit the slipper? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

In lines 54-56, it shows that woman went to great lengths to try to get the slipper to fit. Many hopeful ladies tried on the little blue slipper. Yet, though it was neither too large nor too small, somehow it never quite fit. One woman even cut a bit off her big toe—but it was no use. Fair and Brown couldn’t talk about anything else (line 57). They were jealous of the possibility of Trembling trying on the slipper, so they locked her in the cupboard (line 59).


What is the meaning of jeered in line 58?

Jeered means to make fun of.

Compare and contrast the fight between the Prince of Emania and the Prince of Lochlin, the prince of Spain, and the Zulu prince.

The prince of Emania fought the prince from Lochlin for nine hours, and it was described as a terrible struggle (line 67). After that, the prince from Lochlin gave up his claim and left the field. On the next day, a Spanish prince fought the prince of Emania for six hours before yielding his claim. On the third day, a Zulu prince fought for six hours, then gave up in defeat. (lines 67-70). All of the princes attempted the fight, and all of them eventually gave up. However, the prince of Lochlin had the longest fight, while the other princes fought for the same amount of time.

What is the resolution of the story? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

The Prince tries the slipper on all of the women in the area, and finally tries it on Trembling, despite her sisters protesting (lines 62-63). After it fits her foot, he realizes that she was the woman he saw outside of the church (line 65). Before he can marry her, he has to fight for her hand with other princes from the world (lines 67-70). He defeats them all and marries Trembling. (line 72) Her sisters are put off in a boat in the ocean with provisions for 7 years, but are never seen again. (lines 72-73).

Contrast the dialogue between Trembling and the henwife versus Trembling and her sisters.


The henwife is very compassionate towards Trembling, and is willing to help her because Trembling helped her in the past (line 11). Their dialogue is fun-filled and amiable, and the henwife grants all of Trembling’s requests for the dresses and the horses. She also helps Trembling with her alibi by cooking dinner and asking questions about events to the sisters to imply that she doesn’t know what has been happening in the town and at church. (line 25, 36). Their dialogue shows that Trembling is grateful, yet sees the wish-granting as a game (lines 12, 16). The dialogue between Trembling and her sisters is very harsh because the sisters humiliate and mock her every time they talk to her, starting at the beginning of the story (line 5). They make fun of her for wanting to try on the slipper, calling her stupid (line 58). They also belittle her in front of the prince, by saying they only use her to clean the ashes (line 62).


Writing

Describe Trembling’s relationship with her sisters Fair and Brown and the conflicts they have throughout the story. How does the ending of the story resolve the conflicts? Use evidence from the text to support your answer.


Answer the writing prompt with a three paragraph response.


Listening/Speaking:

Listen to the teacher and your classmates reading the story, to focus on pronunciation and vocabulary understanding. Listen to the link of someone doing an oral storytelling of the book.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAmrhwXY0YA

How I will scaffold my lessons to reach all of my students' levels:


  1. Guide the students in shared reading activities (close reading, chorale reading, reader and response, scooping for fluency).

  2. The class will participate in whole class and small group discussion as we analyze the text.

  3. Discuss the meaning and use of vocabulary words in small groups using the vocabulary word handout.

  4. Use pictures and simplified definitions for lower-level students who need them.

  5. Listen to the audio version of the book by a storyteller so that they can hear as well as read the story.

  6. Have students work on graphic organizers to organize the story into its literary elements.

  7. Students will compare and contrast Fair, Brown, and Trembling with the traditional Cinderella story using a graphic organizer and Venn diagram.

  8. The students will write a response to a writing prompt using evidence from the text.




Differentiated instructional techniques:

The students will use different types of graphic organizers to get information about the poem. The lower-level students will use a simplified graphic organizer go to help them gather information from the text. The intermediate-level students will fill out a form based on the literary elements in the story and have further instruction throughout the day..




How I will assess my students' mastery of the lessons:

I will assess student mastery by asking them to write sample sentences with the vocabulary words. I will check the content of the graphic organizers as well, and students will fill out an organizer that I made on the board so everyone can see their answers and have a class discussion. Finally, students will answer a writing prompt about the story in a three paragraph response.



Suggested Five Day Plan:


  1. Discuss the common elements of a fairy tale; the notes are provided in the lesson. Begin reading the passage (the first page). Answer the text-related questions for the first page. Discuss the questions and answers as a class, practice reading for fluency and scooping. Learn the vocabulary from the first page as well.

  2. Continue reading the text, using reading strategies and scooping for fluency. Answer the text-related questions for the first page. Discuss the questions and answers as a class, as well as learn the vocabulary. Watch the video about the storyteller, explain to students that it’s not word for word with the text, but it provides a way to practice their listening skills.

  3. After the students re-read the text in groups, they fill out the graphic organizer to analyze the literary elements in the story. After the students fill out the organizers, have them write their answers in a large one on the board so that it can be discussed as a class. Review vocabulary, and students can work on a vocabulary crossword puzzle in pairs.

  4. After re-reading the text again, discuss with students the common elements of the traditional Cinderella stories. Give students graphic organizers to compare and contrast Fair, Brown, and Trembling with traditional Cinderella stories.

  5. Introduce students to the writing prompt: Describe Trembling’s relationship with her sisters Fair and Brown and the conflicts they have throughout the story. How does the ending of the story resolve the conflicts? Use evidence from the text to support your answer. Have them write a three-paragraph response to the prompt. Give them support as they write, and help with any questions as needed.



Common Elements of Fairy Tales:


  • Often set in the past

  • Typically incorporate clearly defined good characters and evil characters.

  • Involves magic elements, which may be magical people, animals, or objects.

  • May include objects, people, or events in threes.

  • The plot focuses on a problem or conflict that needs to be solved.

  • Often have happy endings, based on the resolution of the conflict or problem.

Common Elements in Cinderella Stories

  • Each one performed menial labor tasks (cooking, cleaning, sewing, etc.)

  • Each one endured cruel punishments by jealous women and it caused isolation and loneliness

  • Each one was kind-hearted and sweet to all people

  • Each girl had a transformation

  • Every girl’s mother was either absent or dead

  • Each girl got her “prince”

Vocabulary

  1. beautiful- pretty

  2. breadth- width; distance

  3. cloak- cape

  4. defeated- on the losing side

  5. delight- happiness

  6. fascinating- interesting

  7. impatient- not wanting to wait

  8. jeer- to make fun of

  9. mysterious- unexplained; unknown

10. outstrip- move faster than

11. proclaim- to announce or officially state something in front of many people

12 scarlett- bright red

13.shamrock- a green leafed clover.



14. terrified = very afraid




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