The Frog and the Scorpion and the Frog



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The Frog and the Scorpion

The Scorpion and the Frog is a fable of an unknown author, though often mis-attributed to Aesop


  1. Frog lives on river bank, easy-going character, loves lazy days, enjoys life

  2. One day sees a scorpion crying on side of bank

  3. Scorpion says he has to get to the other side to get food and cannot swim

  4. Frog offers lift on understanding scorpion will not sting him

  5. Scorpion assures him he won’t as if he does frog will drown and then they will both die

  6. Scorpion leaps on frog’s back and begins journey

  7. Half way across scorpion raises tail and stings frog

  8. Frog calls out before dying, “But scorpion you will now die as well, why did you sting me?”

  9. Scorpion says, “It’s how I am, it’s in my nature.”

Week 1

How I am…


Good things about me:


Bad things about me:
Sometimes I am…

Things I want to change:

Week 1



The message of the story-


Arguments for:

Arguments against:


Week 1


Notes about Aesop and La Fontaine

Aesop




La Fontaine







Week 1

Proverbs
Strike while the iron is hot.
Don’t count your chickens before they are hatched.
Never look a gift horse in the mouth.
People in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.
Many hands make light work.
Don’t run before you can walk.
Too many cooks spoil the broth.
A stitch in time saves nine.
There is no smoke without fire.
Less haste, more speed.

Week 1


The Fox and the Grapes

one hot summers day a fox was strolling through an orchard he spotted a bunch of ripe grapes hanging from a vine which had been trained over a lofty branch just the thing to quench my thirst he said drawing back a few paces he took a run and a jump and just missed the bunch he tried again taking a longer run-up this time and reaching for the grapes with both his mouth and his paws but again he failed again and again he leapt up towards the tempting bunch but at last had to give up the fox then walked away with his nose in the air saying I bet those grapes are really sour anyway


Week 1


A Fable


Moral:



Animals and characters:



Story start:

Events (problem/conflict):

Resolution:


Week 1

Start a NEW PARAGRAPH when something CHANGES!

A new paragraph shows that-


  1. The story has moved to a new place.

  2. A new character has come into the writing.

  3. Someone different is starting to speak.

  4. Something important has happened.

  5. The story is about a different time.

Week 1


The Grasshopper and the Ant:

A grasshopper gay


Sang the summer away,
And found herself poor
By the winter's first roar.
Of meat or of bread,
Not a morsel she had!
So a-begging she went,
To her neighbour the ant,
For the loan of some wheat,
Which would serve her to eat,
Till the season came round.
"I will pay you," she saith,
"On an animal's faith,
Double weight in the pound
Ere the harvest be bound."
The ant is a friend
(And here she might mend)
Little given to lend.
"How spent you the summer?"
Quoth she, looking shame
At the borrowing dame.
"Night and day to each comer
I sang, if you please."
"You sang! I'm at ease;
For 'tis plain at a glance,
Now, ma'am, you must dance."

La Fontaine

Week 2
Aesop's Fables Glossary

Word

Definition

arbiter



One who is chosen to judge a situation

bill


the beak of an animal

boar

a male pig

boughs

tree branches

bound

tied

carcass

dead body of an animal

ceremony

an act or set of acts done in a certain formal way such as a funeral, wedding, etc..

chafed

to wear away, warm up, scratch by rubbing on something or someone or to annoy someone.

commotion

a disturbance or lots of loud action

conflict

argument, dispute, warfare

constitution

a set of laws or rules for a town, city, country

content

to make someone happy or to be happy or satisfied

contempt

to look down on someone or something, to not respect someone or something

council

a decision making group for a larger group.

desired

wished for, wanted

deceiving

fooling, misleading,


deceptive

sneaky, sly, lying, misleading, fooling

despise

to hate, dislike

devices

tricks, methods to get one's own way, inventions

familiarity

knowing very well

effects

makes something happen

fare

food, something good to eat

flayed

stripped off the outer covering

gasping

taking in one's breath sharply, to breathe hard

gaunt

very thin and bony

gnaw

to chew on

gored

injured someone by sticking them with a large object such as a spear or horn or an animal

grudges

resentments, things one might be upset with someone about

insert

to put into

Jove

Avery important Roman God

labours


jobs, one's work

lair

a wild animal's den

lap

to lick up a liquid with one's tongue as a dog might do

lofty

very high up

mastiffs

a breed of very big, strong working dogs

moiling

working very hard, slaving away

morsel

a tasty bit of food

necessity

something that one must have

objection

A reason to be against something

orchard

An area with fruit or nut trees

outwit

To outsmart, outthink, outdo

pelt

The skin of an animal

petition

To ask for something, a request

plight

A bad situation

procured

gotten, obtained

proposal

A plan, an idea put forth

pursuing


chasing, going after

quench

To put out, to satisfy as to quench one's thirst

quoth

To repeat exactly the words of another

rejoicing rejoice

To celebrate, celebrating




repented

Showed sorrow for doing wrong and makes up for doing wrong

residence

home

retreat retreated retreating

To back off, to go away from the group

revenge

To get back at someone who has done something wrong to you.

scampered

ran off quickly

seize

To grab

serpent

A snake

spring

A small stream of water

sly

Sneaky

stag

A male deer

toil, toiling

working very hard


treacherous

Dangerous, not to be trusted

tyrant

A ruler who has all the power over his people

vengeance

Paying someone back for something bad they did to you.

venture
ventured

To try something that is dangerous or risky

vigilance

Watchfulness



Taken from http://www.mcwdn.org/fables/fabgloss.html
The links to the websites and the contents of the web pages associated with such links specified on this list (hereafter collectively referred to as the ‘Links’) have been checked by Hamilton Trust and to the best of Hamilton Trust’s knowledge, are correct and accurate at the time of publication. Notwithstanding the foregoing or any other terms and conditions on the Hamilton Trust website, you acknowledge that Hamilton Trust has no control over such Links and indeed, the owners of such Links may have removed such Links, changed such Links and/or contents associated with such Links. Therefore, it is your sole responsibility to verify any of the Links which you wish you use. Hamilton Trust excludes all responsibility and liability for any loss or damage arising from the use of any Links.

Week 2


Week 2


© Original resource copyright Hamilton Trust, who give permission for it to be adapted as wished by individual users. Y3_Y4 N Unit 2A_3B1 – AutB – 2 Weeks






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