The History of the Rotary Club



Download 443.95 Kb.
Page1/10
Date conversion18.05.2018
Size443.95 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10



The History
of the
Rotary Club

of McLean


1965-2011


Fourth Edition


Copyright © 2001-2011 Rotary Club of McLean, inc. All rights Reserved.

Table of Contents

1

Development of History ……………………….……………………….… … 2

Preface……………………….……………………….………………………. 3

George H. Wilson* (1965-1966) ……………………….……………………... 4

William M. Stell (1966-1967) ……………………….………………………… 5

Francis L. Koenig* (1967-1968) ……………………….……………………... 6

Robert M. Jackson, Jr.* (1968-1969) ……………………….………………… 7

E. Kendall Stock¹ (1969-1970) ……………………….………………………. 7

Roland Showalter¹ (1970-1971) ……………………….………………………. 8

Jack B. Bays¹ (1971-1972) ……………………….……………………….…… 9

Stanley I. Richards (1972-1973) ……………………….………………………. 11

Wilmer S. Schantz, Jr.¹ (1973-1974) ……………………….…………………... 13

Robert F. Rosenbaum (1974-1975) ……………………….…………………… 16

Robert E. Nay¹ (1975-1976) ……………………….……………………..…… 18

Robert J. Crowell* (1976-1977) ……………………….…………………….…. 20

Roland H. Boehm* (1977-1978) ……………………….………………………. 23

Charles C. Grandy¹ (1978-1979) ……………………….………………………. 25

Daniel Nastoff* (1979-1980) ……………………….…………………….……. 27

Willis L. Fairbanks¹ (1980-1981) ……………………….………………………. 30

Robert R. Lovelace¹ (1981-1982) ……………………….……………………… 32

William V. Burke¹ (1982-1983) ……………………….………………………… 33

J. William Foley* (1983-1984) ……………………….…………………………. 34

Ernest J. Berger¹ (1984-1985) ……………………….……………………….… 35

Walter E. Jenkins, Jr.* (1985-1986) ……………………….……………………. 37

Edward B. Holman (1986-1987) ……………………….………………………. 38

Paul B. Ward (1987-1988) ……………………….……………………….…..… 39

Wesley O. McGee¹ (1988-1989) ……………………….………………….……. 40

Richard H. Miller¹ (1989-1990) ……………………….……………………...…. 41

Thomas A. Toth¹ (1990-1991) ……………………….…………………………. 43

Robert H. Frank (1991-1992) ……………………….………………………..… 44

Tin Tin Nu Raschid¹ (1992-1993) ……………………….………………….…... 45

Peter L. Hilgartner¹ (1993-1994) ……………………….………………………. 47

Chester H. Gray (1994-1995) ……………………….……………………….… 48

S. Robert Ward¹ (1995-1996) ……………………….………………………..… 50

Jerome K. Tankel (1996-1997) ……………………….………………………… 51

John C. Tharrington (1997-1998) ……………………….………………………. 54

Tom Watson O'Bryon II (1998-1999) ……………………….…………………. 58

John P. McEvilly (1999-2000) ……………………….……………………….… 61

Frederic D. Roehner* (2000-2001) ……………………….…………………….. 64

Vance S. Zavela (2001-2002) ……………………….……………………….….. 68

Michael J. Holleran (2002-2003) ……………………….…………………….…. 71

Thomas Mangan (2003-2004) ……………………….……………………….…. 73

Pamela Beck Danner (2004-2005) ……………………….………………….…. 74

B. Todd Dempsey (2005-2006) ……………………….…………………….…. 75

Robert L. Hahne (2006-2007) ……………………….…………………….….. 80

Scott A. Mills (2007-2008) …………………….………………………………. 83

Lois Wilson (2008-2009)……………………………………………………….. 88

Paul A. Frank (2009-2010)……………………………………………………… 90

William Glenn Yarborough, Jr. (2010-2011)……………………………….……. 92

Acknowledgements……………………….……………………….…………….. 95


  1. Deceased

¹ No longer an Active Member of the Club

DEVELOPMENT OF THE HISTORY
The development of the History of the Rotary Club of McLean began in July 2001. The first few months were spent in collecting and assembling some 1750 club bulletins, and in preparing several chronological drafts of selected Rotary years in order to determine the scope and organization of the history. The project was completed in 2004 under the leadership of 2003-2004 President Tom Mangan.
Criteria were established for selection of the kinds of activities and events that would best reflect the history of the Rotary Club of McLean. The following were considered to be of historical significance or interest: selected internal club activities; community service projects and events related to the object of Rotary; club and community social events; youth activities; Rotary district projects, events and social activities; and, selected Rotary International projects and events.
Scope of the History
The original History covers thirty-seven years of Rotary activity. The 2008 revisions updated the History through the 2006-2007 term. Space limitations precluded, in general, including the names of guest speakers and the subject of their presentations. A few exceptions have been made which are representative of the high quality of the guest program which have been presented to the club. Programs presented by our own club members, together with the subject matter, have been included in order to recognize member contribution over and above the normal presentations made in connection with Avenue of Service activities.
Club Bulletin Chronology

The first club bulletin was published in November 1965, and was entitled “The McLean Spy.” In July 1978 the title was changed to “The McLean Wheel” with a new cover design of the Rotary wheel (gear) with symbols for each of the fours Avenues of Service: the last issue with this design was September 1979. The gear and chain design of “The McLean Wheel” came into being in October, 1979; the last issue with this design was July 24th, 2001. A revised design was developed during President Vance Zavela’s Rotary Year. A full-color bulletin was designed by David Coyle during President Bob Hahne’s term. That same term witnessed the introduction of an electronic newsletter, which supplemented the weekly bulletin.

1PREFACE


We open by recounting a little history of Rotary International. It was founded in 1905 by four disparate businessmen, whose original purpose was business-oriented organization. However, under the unexpected leadership of Paul Hams, it did not take long for them to change this focus to the “Service above Self” organization we know today. We call Paul’s leadership unexpected because of his prior work as a deck-hand, cowboy, etc. Today, we might even have called him a hippy. Like the original four, today we might have some members who join us for business reasons, but along the way, get caught up in our “service fever.”
There are a number of things that make Rotary unique, and contribute to our success:


  1. The relationship of the Local Club to the District and to Rotary International. Most of the rules of RI are enforced exclusively by the Club, because we understand the need for individuality, and also realize that rules should be changed only for good reasons. Classification rules are meant to result in a variety of membership and to honor every occupation, but were never meant to keep a good man out of Rotary. Attendance rules are strict, but again, are enforced only by the Club. Each Club President and Board is expected to select its own charitable project each year, after studying the needs of their community, the nation and the world.

2. Recognition of powers beyond ourselves leads us to open each meeting with a prayer, a salute to the Flag and a patriotic song. This binds us together, even in the face of greatly different religions and nationalities.

3. Yielding to evolution, over time we developed (and modified) the Four-Way Test, the

Object of Rotary, the motto, “Service above Self,” and the division into Districts. When the issue of discrimination against women arose in the United States, again RI ruled that the individual Club could decide. This greatly strengthened U. S. clubs, while allowing other national cultures remain.

4. Maybe the most important factor of all is...WE ALL HAVE FUN!

The Rotary Club of McLean was chartered on November 10, 1965 under the leadership of Dan Nastoff (“Father Dan”) A member of Falls Church Rotary Club, who had been commissioned by the District Governor to organize a new club in McLean. Father Dan had first joined Rotary while on a tour of duty in Istanbul, Turkey. It would not be possible to describe the great energy and skill he expended in the next several months, but so effective was his leadership that we had the shortest transitory period in Rotary history, as only one day elapsed between being a “provisional” club and receiving our charter. Father Dan had to forego the honor of the first presidency, as his service to his country took him to Pakistan, where (guess what?), he joined the Islamabad Rotary Club.
We can only speculate what the effect of his service abroad has had on our relationship with those two vital allies, but we can revel in the results of his “Service above Self” in McLean. May each of us find inspiration from his example, to continue the momentum of Service that has marked the Rotary Club of McLean.
William M. Stell

1ROTARY YEAR 1965-1966



President, George H. Wilson

McLean Rotary Club was founded in 1965, under the sponsorship of Falls Church Rotary Club. Daniel Nastoff (“Father Dan”) was appointed Governor’s Special Representative to see to the establishment of Rotary in McLean, and Father Dan did a superb job. During the summer of 1965, Dan called on scores of McLean businessmen, most of whom knew nothing of Rotary, scheduled and convened Tuesday luncheon meetings at the old Pikestaff Restaurant, and did all the paperwork to have us accepted by District 760 and Rotary International. The charter was approved on November 10, 1965, and presented by District Governor Peter A. Wallenborn on the 15th. We enjoyed the shortest transitory period of any club in Rotary history with only one day elapsing between being a provisional club and receiving our official charter.

More needs to be said about Father Dan. A State Department employee, he first became involved in Rotary when his landlord in Istanbul, Turkey, invited him to a Rotary meeting. Soon as a member himself, he found in Rotary a perfect vehicle for expressing his own desire to serve, and for his inimitable manner of bringing people together. He was denied the charter presidency of McLean Rotary, when his job again took him away, this time to Islamabad, Pakistan, where, you guessed it, he soon became a member of Rotary. Who knows how the present tenuous relationship between our two countries was smoothed by his presence there?

There were 22 Charter members, as follows:

George H. Wilson, Charter President

Roland H. Boehm

Joseph A. Chule

Russell A. Cone

William R. Everhart

Herbert H. Goodman

Howard H. Greenstreet

Virgil J. Harris

Joseph T. Hart

Robert M. Jackson, Jr.

Frank Lynch

Orville B. Lynn

George W. McCay

W. Denver McKinney

Emory R. Moore

William A. Moore

Richard F. Olander

Jeremiah D. O’Meara

Carl T. Roepken

R. Roland Showalter

William M. Stell

Edward H. Wright

The first fund-raising event was the raffle of a new Ford automobile. Each member was asked to sell 10 - $10 tickets, to make an expected profit of $1,000. A week before the drawing, it became apparent that it was not working, so at an emergency meeting, we printed signs and set up sales points at several shopping centers, we all manned them, and pulled off a profit of $600.00. It was then that we first became a Rotary Club, because we worked together for the first time to faced a challenge. We also found that many of those who purchased chances were proud to tell of a relative or close friend who acquainted them with Rotary.

Our first service project was McLean Area Playground for Retarded Children, which we planned when we found that the Fairfax School Program for retarded children had no plans for the children during the summer. We provided initial funding and did leg-work to effect a program at Lewinsville School. (Personal note: One of the children in the Retarded Children’s program was the son of a widow, who Bill Stell insured. Within two weeks, her friend called to invite Bill to bid on a business account, which he won. It turned out to be a cutting edge tech firm, and ended up being Bill’s largest and most interesting account).
The first issue of The McLean Wheel was issued on May 1, 1966, and has of course grown and expanded continuously since that date.
ROTARY YEAR 1966-1967

President, William M. Stell
The year got off to a slow start, when President Bill underwent back surgery, rendering him unable to participate for approximately two months. His offer to step aside was declined, and Past President George Wilson guided the Club during that period. Many say the formation of the Club was made more solid by the call for extra effort that the situation required of every member.
We continued to participate in the Retarded Children Program at Lewinsville School, including a donation of $1,000 to the cause, and a group visit to the facility in August. This was held up as an ideal Rotary function: to initiate a needed service, and then have it taken over by others (Fairfax County).

Other community contributions included support of a child in Pakistan at $25.00 per month (a further opportunity provided through Father Dan), a donation of $100.00 to Dolley Madison Library, and the raffle of a television set to benefit McLean Central Park.

The idea of sponsoring an International Sculpture Contest in McLean Central Park was proposed, and a study was undertaken, chaired by President Elect Francis Koenig.
Our social calendar was meager. We held a Rotary picnic at Middleburg Park, which was not well attended. We also held a father/son luncheon in June, at Evans Farm Inn, but that was also poorly attended. The social camaraderie was slow in following the service camaraderie. At the end of this year, we had grown to only 25 members.
It was only in May that we first received our Club banners. The universal concept of exchanging banners upon visiting another club has not persisted. On August 1, 1967, Dan Nastoff’s tenure as club supervisor ended, although he continued as a valuable member until his transfer out of the country.
One of our Charter Members, Herb Goodman, fell ill with cancer, and much of our concerns were for Hurb and his family. Sadly, Herb passed away during the first week of January, 1967.
While we were all new to the shape of Rotary, we learned fast. It is recalled that District Governor George Burton gave us a valuable hint: “The classification system was never intended to keep a good man out of Rotary.” That principle has, of course, been reinforced by subsequent changes in classification rules.
ROTARY YEAR 1967-1968

President, Francis Koenig

This was the year that almost all our attention was riveted on the International Sculpture Contest. First suggested by Jeremiah O’Meara, it was to take place in McLean Central Park in the summer of 1968. We sent out invitations to many, and were to select 15 contestants to construct mortar-on-metal sculptures on site in McLean Central Park. There were to be 5 judges, with a first prize of $1,500.00, and second and third prizes of $750.00. Contestants were to be supported during the term of construction, from July 15 to August 31.

By mid-November, various obstacles arose including a need to “clarify statue sites” and the contest was moved back to summer 1969.
In March, 1968, President Koenig announced he had received indications of support for his effort from Corcoran Art Gallery and National Gallery of Art. And in June, Fairfax County Park Authority agreed to contribute $7,500 to the Sculpture Contest.
We continued our tradition of supporting Dolley Madison Library with a donation of $150.00
President Koenig wished to emphasize attendance, and the Club Service Committee paired Rotarians off, to call each other if one missed a meeting. The efforts reached a climax in a three-month attendance contest with Vienna and Herndon Clubs, the winner to receive a free pass to dinner and dancing at Westover Country Club on January 11, 1968. Our Club achieved 93% attendance in the three month period, only to be defeated by Herndon, who recorded 100% (!).
On a business note, McLean Rotary was incorporated on October 17, 1967. And our District Conference at Virginia Beach in April 1968 was overshadowed by the assassination of Martin Luther King, and the resulting riots in Washington.
Social events included a golf outing and dinner theater party at Shady Grove in October, informal cocktails and a “How-de-do” party at the Highlander Club in December, and a crab feast and picnic at President Koenig’s beach home in June. That great time was highlighted by President Elect Bob Jackson, allergic to crabs, attacking his hot dogs with the mallet.
ROTARY YEAR 1968-1969

President, Robert M. Jackson, Jr.

This year in Rotary may best be illustrated by the “crab” story on President Bob. He was just a lot of fun to be around, while conducting the business in a serious manner. One of the hallmarks of our Club (and perhaps of Rotary at large) is the way we prosper under radically different styles of leadership.
One emphasis this year was on member participation. No fewer than 12 of our weekly meetings featured our own members, including two programs by irrepressible Orville Lynn, showing old movies, and a presentation on alcoholism by Frank Lynch, our resident AA member.
When District Governor Karl Hellinger visited us, we turned it into a cocktail party and dinner at the Highlander Club. The result was that Governor Karl ever after found McLean to be one of his favorite clubs.
For a change, there were no major fund raisers this year. The records of our community service are almost totally lacking; we did donate $25.00 to the McLean Art Club as a prize for their Tyson’s Corner Art Show, and donated $60.00 to Falls Church-McLean Day Care Center, collected from members in $10.00 increments.
We received Andrea Ximinez from Guatemala for eight weeks, January 16 to March 17, under the Experiment in Living program. She spoke to us at our January 21 meeting, and was given a fond farewell at our “Charter Party” on March 7 at Westwood Country Club, with cocktails, dinner and dancing.
New administrative ground was broken, as we:

-created a nominating committee of Past Presidents, which continues today:

-designated the Past President as Vice President, a practice which we are discontinuing.

-to encourage Rotary Information, members fined can escape by answering Rotary questions.

After 3 years, 17 of the original charter members remain on board, and 7 of them had 3 years’ perfect attendance. Rotary International consisted of 648,000 members in 13,624 clubs, in 145 countries. Compare that with today’s figures.

We were called on to handle registration at the Arlington District Conference and as a result had very high attendance.
ROTARY YEAR 1969-1970

President, E. Kendall Stock
President Ken emphasized new membership and attendance, and both efforts worked. The Club Service Committee installed a rule that any Rotarian who had not brought a guest to a meeting had to be carrying a membership application card or be fined. We finally were able to record 100% attendance at the January 13th meeting, and announced that attendance in December was 90.75%. Our attendance for the year was 92.7%, and we were in the top ten Clubs in the District in 10 of the 12 months. And at the District Conference in Williamsburg, we won the DC attendance award, in spite of the perils of a snow-storm. We also had a very high attendance at the Rotary International Convention in Atlanta.
Our International Service Committee hosted a student from Mona, Italy, Massimiliano “Moshi” Sironi, on behalf of the Experiment in International Living. Hosted by the families of George Wilson, Emory Moore, Bill Stell and Hal Shook, his presence was a great pleasure, stating with a cocktail party at George and Helen Wilson’s on August 2nd, and continuing as he addressed our weekly meeting on September 23rd. We were all expecting to hear great things from Moschi, as he returned to his home.

The social program was highlighted by a party at President Ken’s Leesburg home, featuring square dancing lessons and hay rides. We chartered a bus for the ride out, and since there was an open bar on board, everyone was in a very good mood. The extra electrical equipment in use caused a black-out, so we had fun watching Emory Moore encouraging Al Audet to climb down into the well pit to find the circuit breaker. We can’t remember if he ever did.

We hosted 18 Children of Falls Church-McLean Day Care Center for a Christmas party at Evans Farm Inn, undeterred by a snow-storm and encouraged by the picture of Santa Bob Crowell hugging the kids and handing out gifts. Our Charter Night party was held on April 3rd at the Naval Gun Factory, with cocktails, dinner, singing and dancing. We got used to George Wilson’s exuberant singing, not to mention Roland Boehm, who lapsed into German songs while trying to hold on to his drink. Ah, the beauty of good fellowship!
On a serious note, we held an evening family meeting on December 2nd to hear the renowned astronomer Reverend Francis J. Hayden talk on “Life on Other Planets.”
President Ken handed over the gavel to Roland Showalter at a Friday picnic and swim party at Al Audet’s house.
ROTARY YEAR 1970 – 1971

President, R. Roland Showalter
Following the opening of the first meeting by President Showalter, immediate PP Ken Stock was introduced to make a few remarks. He expressed appreciation for club support during his year and singled out Programs, Attendance, Membership, Fellowship and the Secretary for special recognition. With respect to the New Year, it was noted in the bulletin that five of the eight committee chairmen selected to serve were Past Presidents.
In July, the club directors set up the McLean Rotary Foundation. During the months of July and August routine club matters were discussed at the club meetings.
A social event (Family Night) was held in September. Dan Nastoff (Godfather of the McLean club) was a visitor from his Foreign Service assignment in Islamabad, Pakistan during the month.

In November, a fund-raising event entitled AUCTIONEERIE was held in conjunction with the Annandale club. During the month the club also held a meeting at a most unusual location, the CIA, which was arranged by Russ Cone. Lunch was served in an area that is available for invited guests. Questions were entertained but no classified information was contained in the responses. On December 15th the club was entertained by those wonderful McLean Madrigal Singers. The annual club Christmas party was a joint affair held on the 17th in Reston with several other clubs. Bill Stell, as usual, arranged for the 45 kids from the Falls Church-McLean Day Care Center to be guests of the club for their Christmas party which was held on the 22nd.

It was noted in the first bulletin in January 1971, that support was continuing for Little Rebecca in the Abbottabad Christian School in West Pakistan. The bulletin of January 19th is significant in that it was stated that the Past Presidents Advisory Council is drafting changes to the club by-laws which include the provision that the Club Secretary also be the President Elect. Further that the outgoing President would be the Vice President.
It was noted in a March bulletin that the club was “all signed up behind a Babe Ruth team this year.” Also, RI had approved the charter of the McLean Rotary Club Foundation (as of April the club had 32 members – the club was chartered on November 10, 1965 with 22 members).
In the May 4th bulletin reference was made to the McCays’ round-the-world trip and to the fine work George is doing to broaden the international avenue of service to include groundwork for establishing club to club relationship. George is recognized as a “First-class Rotary ambassador.”
The June 1st issue of the bulletin indicated that the club was looking for a host family to provide room and board for Sven Karlson, a Swedish exchange student.
Money was donated prior to the end of the year to Freedom House, an ongoing club project.

President Roland Showalter and his wife Mary held a cocktail party for the club at their home in Arlington on the 26th of June. The last bulletin of the year stated that the Showalters “sure know how to throw a party and a great time was had by all.”


  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10


The database is protected by copyright ©hestories.info 2017
send message

    Main page