The Ideal kiss grammar Sequence Book 2 Supplemental Exercises

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The Ideal KISS Grammar Sequence

Book 2

Supplemental Exercises

© Dr. Ed Vavra

Revised June, 2015
KISS Instructional Materials are available for free at KISSGrammar.org.


Unit 1—Review 4

Ex. 1 Modal Helping Verbs, Based on The Tales of Beatrix Potter 4



Unit 2—Nouns and Pronouns 5

Subject/Verb Agreement—Usage 5

Ex. 1 – Subject/Verb Agreement –“Doesn’t” and “Don’t” 5

Ex. 2 – Subject/Verb Agreement –“You” 6

Ex. 3 – Subject/Verb Agreement 7

Ex. 4 – Subject/Verb Agreement 8

Writing 9

Ex. 1 - Adding Adverbial Phrases


of Time and Place 9

Unit 3 - The Five Types of Complements 10

Ex. 1 - Mixed Complements:


from “The Story of the First Moles” 10

Indirect Objects 11

Ex. 1 - Based on Child-Story Readers (1) 11

Ex. 2 - Based on Child-Story Readers (2) 12



Unit 5 - A Focus on Style 13

Ex. 1 - Sentence-Combining from “Crow Talk” 13


Unit 7 - More about Prepositional Phrases 14

Compound Objects of Prepositions 14

Ex. 1 – 14

The “To” Problem 14

Ex. 2 - 14

Is It a Preposition? (PP or SC?) 14

Ex. 3 – 14

Prepositional Phrases as Indirect Objects 15

Ex. 4 - Based on Child-Story Readers 15

Ex. 5 – 16

Embedded Prepositional Phrases 16

Ex. 6 – 16

Ex. 7 - 16


Unit 8 - Phrases: Modification and Chunking 17

Ex. 1 - The Functions of Prepositional Phrases


from “The Story of the Oriole” (#1) 17

Ex. 2 - The Functions of Prepositional Phrases


from “The Story of the Oriole” (#2) 18

Ex. 3 - The Functions of Prepositional Phrases


from “The Story of the Oriole” (#3) 19

Ex. 4 - The Functions of Prepositional Phrases


from “The Story of the Oriole” (#4) 20



Unit 1—Review

Ex. 1 Modal Helping Verbs, Based on The Tales of Beatrix Potter


Directions:

1. Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline verbs twice, their subjects once, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO” or “DO”).



1. That would have been extremely painful to the Flopsy Bunnies.

2. She needed to hatch her own eggs.

3. With such a large pea in her mouth, she could not answer.

4. Should Nutkin have dared to tease Old Mr. Brown?

5. Can there really have been someone in the house?

6. In winter and early spring he might generally be found amongst the rocks at the top of Bull Banks, under Oatmeal Crag.

7. Why shouldn’t I rush along and put my pie into Ribby’s oven?

8. Then I must have been eating MOUSE!...

9. Some day I shall have to make another, larger, book.

10. Jemima Puddle-duck ought to have been more careful about strangers.

11. I will bring my bedding out, and dry it in the sun.

12. Perhaps I may have to burn sulphur.


Unit 2—Nouns and Pronouns

Subject/Verb Agreement—Usage

Ex. 1 – Subject/Verb Agreement –“Doesn’t” and “Don’t”


“Doesn’t” is used with singular subjects—“He doesn’t laugh.” “Don’t” is used with plural subjects—“They don’t play nicely.”
Directions:

1. Fill in the blank with the correct form of “doesn’t” or “don’t.”

2. Underline subjects once and verbs twice.

1. The rain __________ stop.

2. The clouds __________ move.

3. The weather __________ please.

4. The flower __________ open.

5. The grasshopper __________ chirp.

6. The butterfly __________ flit.

7. The bee __________ work.

8. The birds __________ sing.

9. The farmer __________ plough.

10. The children __________ shout.

11. The sun __________ shine.

12. He __________ care.

Ex. 2 – Subject/Verb Agreement –“You”


Remember that plural verbs are always used with “you.”

Directions:

1. Fill in the blank with the correct form of “were,” “wasn’t,” or “weren’t.”

2. Underline subjects once and verbs twice.

1. You ____________ beaten.

2. ____________ you beaten?

3. ____________ you beaten?

4. You ____________ shaken.

5. ____________ you shaken?

6. How you ____________ shaken!

7. We ____________ beaten.

8. ____________ he beaten?

9. ____________ they beaten?

10. ____________ you chosen?

11. ____________ he chosen ?

12. ____________ we chosen?



Ex. 3 – Subject/Verb Agreement

Note: The word “tongs” names one tool; but, because this tool has two parts, the word is written and used as if it meant more than one.


Tongs

Directions:

1. Underline subjects once and verbs twice.

2. In the blank after each sentence, write “S” if the verb is singular or “P” if it is plural.

1. The tongs are broken. ______

2. Aren’t the tongs broken? ______

3. Weren’t the tongs broken? ______

4. Were the scissors stolen? ______

5. Aren’t the shears broken? ______

6. Have the ashes been shaken? ______

7. How the ashes do fly! ______

8. Where were the ashes thrown? ______

9. Weren’t the ashes shaken? ______

10. Don’t the shears cut? ______

11. There goes the rabbit. ______

12. Here come the dogs. ______

13. After them goes Joe with his gun. ______

14. Here come Joe and his dogs on their return. ______

15. In Joe’s bag are a rabbit and a squirrel. ______


Ex. 4 – Subject/Verb Agreement


Directions:

1. Place parentheses around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline subjects once and verbs twice.

3. Label complements “PA,” “PN,” “IO,” or “DO.”

4. Label Interjections “Inj.”
Note: In the third sentence “one” means “one boy.” In the sixth, “one” means “one girl.” In the seventh, “neither” means “neither bag.” In the eighth, ignore “to crack nuts.” You’ll learn how to explain it later.

1. On what tree do acorns grow?

2. Here is a pocketful of chestnuts.

3. One of the boys is climbing the tree.

4. In his pocket are a knife and a top.

6. Down come knife, top, and nuts.

6. Every one of the girls has filled her basket.

7. Neither of the bags has been filled.

8. Halloo! Doesn’t that squirrel know how to crack nuts!

9. Weren’t you and Billy up the tree?

10. A whole barrelful of nuts was taken from here yesterday.


Writing

Ex. 1 - Adding Adverbial Phrases
of Time and Place



Rentoul, Annie R. and Outhwaite, Grenbry,
Fairyland, Frederick A.Stokes, 1926.

Directions:

Rewrite each of the following sentences by adding at least two prepositional phrases. One phrase should indicate time (when something happened), and the other should indicate place (where something happened).

1. Jim and Jane were playing catch.

2. The twins watched a movie.

3. Their friends went fishing.

4. Amanda won the race.

5. Bill read a story.

6. The family went on a picnic.

7. Paul visited his grandparents.

8. Ellen made a sandwich.

9. The snake escaped.

10. The students put on a play.



Unit 3 - The Five Types of Complements



Ex. 1 - Mixed Complements:
from “The Story of the First Moles”


in
The Book of Nature Myths by Florence Holbrook

Directions:

1. Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline verbs twice, their subjects once, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO” or “DO”).

1. The poor man was sorrowful.

2. The rich man would have run away.

3. Whose ground is this?

4. Never again shall they see the light of the sun.

5. Then another voice was heard.

6. The mole never comes to the light of day.

7. This is the ground of the rich man.

8. The southern half of the field is mine.

9. How shall I ever get food for my children!

10. This is the story of the first moles.


Indirect Objects

Ex. 1 - Based on Child-Story Readers (1)


Wonder Stories 3, by Frank N. Freeman, Grace E. Storm,
Eleanor M. Johnson, & W. C. French.

Illustrated by Vera Stone Norman.

New York: Lyons and Carnahan, 1927-29-36.




Part One:

Directions:

1. Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline verbs twice, their subjects once, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO” or “DO”).

1. The king gave the big man rich gifts.

2. Hok Lee paid the doctor a lot of money.

3. Hok Lee told the dwarfs all his troubles.

4. They brought him fine new clothes.

5. The White Cat gave the Prince an acorn.

6. He showed them his acorn.

7. They will cook me my food.

8. The people in the country gave the ogre and Jager many presents.

9. She brought me to this place and gave me a troop of cats.



Part Two:

On separate paper, rewrite each of the sentences, but replace the indirect objects with prepositional phrases with “to” or “for.”





Ex. 2 - Based on Child-Story Readers (2)

Wonder Stories 3, by Frank N. Freeman, Grace E. Storm,
Eleanor M. Johnson, & W. C. French.

Illustrated by Vera Stone Norman.

New York: Lyons and Carnahan, 1927-29-36.


Part One:

Directions:

1. Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline verbs twice, their subjects once, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO” or “DO”).

1. The Prince had to bring the King a fine piece of cloth.

2. The Hands gave him a princely suit of clothes.

3. The oldest of the little lions gave his father and mother a great deal of trouble.

4. I will also give you a wooden horse.

5. She told him the whole story.

6. He gave me a picture of himself.

7. They owed him his freedom.

8. Omar fed Jumbo twenty-five pounds of cooked rice and four hundred pounds of grasses.

9. So the men unhitched their horses and fed them.



Part Two:

On separate paper, rewrite each of the sentences, but replace the indirect objects with prepositional phrases with “to” or “for.”




Unit 5 - A Focus on Style

Ex. 1 - Sentence-Combining from “Crow Talk”


From FRIENDLY FAIRIES
Written & Illustrated by Johnny Gruelle

1919


Directions: Read the passage all the way through. You will notice that the sentences are short and choppy. Study the passage, and then rewrite it in a better way. You may combine sentences, change the order of words, and omit words that are repeated too many times. But try not to leave out any of the information.

So Dickie took two handfuls of pennies. The pennies were golden. He took them downtown. He bought a fine pony. The pony was little. It had a little stomach. Its stomach was round. Dickie bought a pony cart. The cart was pretty. And he bought a harness. Then Dickie drove the pony back home.



Unit 7 - More about Prepositional Phrases

Compound Objects of Prepositions

Ex. 1

The “To” Problem

Ex. 2 -

Is It a Preposition? (PP or SC?)

Ex. 3



Prepositional Phrases as Indirect Objects

Ex. 4 - Based on Child-Story Readers


Wonder Stories 3, by Frank N. Freeman, Grace E. Storm,
Eleanor M. Johnson, & W. C. French.

Illustrated by Vera Stone Norman.

New York: Lyons and Carnahan, 1927-29-36.







In a sentence such as “He gave the flower to June,” some grammarians consider “to June” to be an adverbial phrase that modifies “gave.” Others consider “to June” to be a prepositional phrase that functions as an indirect object of “gave.” Either explanation is acceptable, but KISS prefers the indirect object.

Part One:

Directions:

1. Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline verbs twice, their subjects once, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO” or “DO”).

3. Write “IO” above phrases that can be explained as an indirect object.

1. The crane sends greetings to Akka, the wild goose, and her flock.

2. He gave a bag of money to the big man.

3. Often Tom caught flies and gave them to the trout.

4. A few days later a king from a far country marched upon the city and sent a message to its king.

5. Jager paid no attention to him.

6. The beautiful princess sent away all the people, and then told the story of her life to the Prince.


Part Two:

On separate paper, rewrite each of the sentences, but replace the prepositional phrases with normal indirect objects.




Ex. 5



Embedded Prepositional Phrases

Ex. 6



Ex. 7 -


Unit 8 - Phrases: Modification and Chunking



Ex. 1 - The Functions of Prepositional Phrases
from “The Story of the Oriole” (#1)


in The Book of Nature Myths
by Florence Holbrook

Directions:

1. Place parentheses ( ) around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline every subject once, every verb twice, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO,” or “DO”).

3. Draw an arrow from every adjective to the word it modifies; and an arrow from every adverb to the word it modifies.

4. Draw an arrow from every preposition to the word that its phrase modifies. Above the phrase write “J” for “adjective” or “V” for “adverb.”

1. The king of the north struck at him with a war-club.

2. The sun hid himself in fear.

3. An oriole is loved by every one.

4. I am master of the country of ice and snow.

5. The land of the south was ever bright and sunny.

6. And even the oaks could not stand against its power.

7. He will build his nest on our trees.



Ex. 2 - The Functions of Prepositional Phrases
from “The Story of the Oriole” (#2)


in The Book of Nature Myths
by Florence Holbrook

Directions:

1. Place parentheses ( ) around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline every subject once, every verb twice, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO,” or “DO”).

3. Draw an arrow from every adjective to the word it modifies; and an arrow from every adverb to the word it modifies.

4. Draw an arrow from every preposition to the word that its phrase modifies. Above the phrase write “J” for “adjective” or “V” for “adverb.”

1. The thunder growled in the hollows of the mountains.

2. My king, on all the earth no one loves me.

3. The arrows of the lightning are aimed at us.

4. You shall no longer be a stinging insect.

5. Their roots were tough and strong.

6. At last the king of the north went back to his own country, and drove before him the thunder and lightning and rain and the black storm-clouds and the icy wind.


Ex. 3 - The Functions of Prepositional Phrases
from “The Story of the Oriole” (#3)


in The Book of Nature Myths
by Florence Holbrook

Directions:

1. Place parentheses ( ) around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline every subject once, every verb twice, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO,” or “DO”).


3. Draw an arrow from every adjective to the word it modifies; and an arrow from every adverb to the word it modifies.

4. Draw an arrow from every preposition to the word that its phrase modifies. Above the phrase write “J” for “adjective” or “V” for “adverb.”

1. The northwind shall bear my icy breath.

2. The cruel storm-wind and rain beat upon them.

3. You shall be a bright and happy oriole.

4. Bird and beast shall quiver and tremble with cold.

5. The fallen trees lay on the earth and wailed in sorrow.

6. The little insect went out alone, and bravely stung the master of the storm-wind.



Ex. 4 - The Functions of Prepositional Phrases
from “The Story of the Oriole” (#4)


in The Book of Nature Myths
by Florence Holbrook

Directions:

1. Place parentheses ( ) around each prepositional phrase.

2. Underline every subject once, every verb twice, and label complements (“PA,” “PN,” “IO,” or “DO”).

3. Draw an arrow from every adjective to the word it modifies; and an arrow from every adverb to the word it modifies.

4. Draw an arrow from every preposition to the word that its phrase modifies. Above the phrase write “J” for “adjective” or “V” for “adverb.”

1. But all at once the sky grew dark.

2. A mocking laugh was heard from among the clouds.

3. I cannot be ruler of the land of sunshine and flowers.

4. In the fearful gloom came the white fire of the forked lightning.

5. My king, may I go out and fight the wicked master of the storm-wind?



6. O dear ruler of the southland, must we yield to the cruel master of the north?


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