The King of Kings School Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy with Procedures and Guidance

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The King of Kings School
Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy
with
Procedures and Guidance

December 2017




CONTENTS
School statement 3

Safer Working Practices 6

Key Training Areas and Timescales 8

Important Contact Details and Timescales 14

Multi-Agency Levels of Need and Response Framework 15

Child Protection Policy 17

The Prevent Duty 17

Definitions of Abuse 19

Specific Safeguarding Issues 20

Students with SEND 20

Children Missing Education 20

Child Sexual Exploitation 20

Peer on Peer Abuse 21

Organised Abuse 23

Female Genital Mutilation 23

Radicalisation 23


Honour-Based Violence 24

Other Safeguarding Issues 25

Recognising and Responding to Abuse 25

Arrangements for Supervision of Group/Children’s Activities 29

Suspicions/Allegations of Child Abuse involving School Staff 30

Photography and Images 32

Safer Recruitment Policy 33

External Visitors/Visiting Speakers 35

Agency Staff 35

Renewal of DBS Checks 36

Safety Matters 36

Role and Responsibilities of the School DSL 38

Youth-Produced Sexual Imagery 39

E-Safety and Data Protection Policy 47

Acceptable Use Agreements and E-Safety Rules 70

Help and Support 77

Current Legislation 77

Referral chart 81

Information to be considered when determining whether an applicant with a

Criminal record is suitable for the post applied for 82

DBS Certificate Risk Assessment Pro forma 85

Briefing Sheet for temporary staff 86

Definitions of Abuse 87


Contact information 93

Traffic Light Tool 99

SAFEGUARDING POLICY

Incorporating our Child Protection Policy, Safer Recruitment Policy, E-Safety and Data Protection Policy and Youth Produced Imagery Policy*

This document has been reviewed with reference to the documents, Keeping Children Safe in Education (Sept 2016), The Prevent Duty, Departmental advice for schools and childcare providers, July 2015, Working Together to Safeguard Children Feb 2017 and The Children Act 2004. These documents are kept on file in the school. It has also taken into account advice received from the Manchester Safeguarding the Children Board (MSCB).


SCHOOL STATEMENT
We recognise our moral and statutory responsibility to safeguard and promote the welfare of all children.
Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is defined for the purposes of this policy as protecting children from maltreatment, preventing impairment of children’s health or development, ensuring that children grow up with safe and effective care, and taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes.

The terms ‘child’ and ‘children’ includes everyone under the age of 18.

The Governors and staff take seriously their responsibility to protect and safeguard the welfare of children and young people in the school. They will ensure that persons with leadership and management responsibilities demonstrate good skills and knowledge appropriate to their role and fulfil their responsibilities effectively so that the independent school standards are met consistently; and actively promote the well-being of pupils according to section 10(2) of the Children Act 2004(a).

We make every effort to provide a safe and welcoming environment underpinned by a culture of openness where both children and adults feel secure, able to talk and believe that they are being listened to. We maintain an attitude of “it could happen here” where safeguarding is concerned.

The purpose of this policy is to provide staff, volunteers and governors with the framework they need in order to keep children safe and secure in school and to inform parents and guardians how we will safeguard their children whilst in our care.

Specific guidance is available to staff within the procedure documents.
The school will educate and encourage pupils to keep safe through:

The content of the complementary and ACE curriculum.

Safeguarding issues are addressed regularly in Scripture, Current Affairs, English Literature and form periods (See PHSE policy).

School ethos helps children to feel safe and able to talk freely about their concerns, believing they will be listened to and valued.

Staff will notify colleagues and/or parents of any concerns about their child(ren), and provide them with, or signpost them to, opportunities to change the situation.

They will liaise with other agencies that support pupils and provide early help and ensure everyone knows who the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) and Deputy DSL are and how to contact them.




Our Designated Safeguarding Lead is Beccy Judson. Her role is to provide support and direction to staff members to carry out their safeguarding duties and to liaise closely with other services such as Children’s Social Care, the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO), the DBS and the police when managing referrals. She works closely with the Headteacher.
Our Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead is Brenda Lewis. Her role is to provide support to the Lead and to be available.

Our Chair of Governors is Dr Philip Lewis.

Our Safeguarding Governor is Dr Bamidele Oyebande. His role in Safeguarding is to take the lead in dealing with allegations of abuse made against the Headteacher. He checks the termly Safeguarding Report and audit.
Our Independent Governor is Mr Nigel Steele. The student voice is embedded in the independent Governor. The DSL has direct and private communication with Mr Steele and lets him know on a weekly basis, by email, whether there are any issues requiring his attention.
Our Headteacher is Brenda Lewis. Her role in Safer Recruitment is to ensure that the school operates safe recruitment practices and to make sure that all appropriate checks are carried out on staff and volunteers who work with the children.
Our Deputy Head is Justine Golamhossen. Her role in Safer Recruitment is to assist the Headteacher.
All staff members must read the content of this policy. The Teacher Standards 2012 states that teachers, including Headteachers, should safeguard children’s well-being and maintain public trust in the teaching profession as part of their professional duties.
All staff must undertake a regular course on Safeguarding and Child Protection that must be updated regularly. The school is committed to an on-going training programme on these matters. Yearly updates are undertaken at the beginning of the Autumn Term each year as part of the Autumn INSET.
All staff must read Part 1 and Appendix A, Further Information, of Keeping Children Safe in Education September 2016. Staff have been tested on their understanding of this and are required to refresh this annually.
The Governors recognise the need to build constructive links with childcare agencies, and will work with social care, the police, health services and other services to promote the welfare of children and protect them from harm.

The Governors are committed to:


  • Listening to, relating effectively to and valuing children and young people while ensure their protection within school activities.

  • Ensuring safeguarding is taught as part of a broad and balanced curriculum.

  • Employing the expertise of staff when reviewing safeguarding policies and providing opportunities for staff to contribute to and shape safeguarding arrangements and the Child Protection Policy.

  • Encouraging and supporting parents and carers.

  • Ensuring that staff members are given support and training

  • Having a system for dealing with concerns about possible abuse

  • Maintaining good links with the statutory child care authorities

All staff have a key role to play in safeguarding children, identifying concerns early and providing help for children and families and should familiarise themselves of the systems within the school that support safeguarding, which are explained in the staff induction.


Where a child is suffering significant harm, or is likely to do so, action will be taken to protect that child. Action will also be taken to promote the welfare of a child in need of additional support, even if they are not suffering harm or are at immediate risk.
Everyone who encounters children and their families has a role to play in safeguarding children. Anyone working in the school is particularly important as they are in a position to identify concerns early and provide help to children to prevent concerns from escalating; they form part of the wider safeguarding system. See Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015 (updated 2017).

All staff members have a responsibility to provide a safe environment in which children can learn. They have a responsibility to identify children who may be in need of extra help or who are suffering, vulnerable, or are likely to suffer, significant harm. Staff have a responsibility to review and monitor the list of these students on a regular basis and all staff members have a responsibility to take any appropriate action, working with other services as necessary, including Early Help.

Early Help is used to describe the process of taking action early and as soon as possible to tackle problems emerging for children, young people and their families. Effective help can occur at any point in a child’s or young person’s life. Staff should be able to identify the vulnerable children in the school who need this level of support. These children should be identified and monitored. Staff need to understand the difference between a safeguarding concern and a child in immediate danger or at significant risk of harm, as part of identifying vulnerable students. Concerns should be registered with Manchester’s Early Help Hub, following the procedures outlined in Appendix 9.
In addition to working with the Designated Safeguarding Lead Staff, all staff members should be aware that they might be asked to support social workers to take decisions about individual children and should make themselves aware of the systems within the school that support safeguarding, which are explained in the staff induction. This includes the school’s Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy, the Staff Code of Conduct, and the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL).
Staff members should be aware of the signs of abuse and neglect in order to identify children who may be in need of help or protection. Knowing what to look for is vital to the early identification of abuse and neglect. If staff members are unsure they should contact the DSL or the Headteacher for help. They may always speak directly to Children Social Care, on 0161 234 5001 if circumstances require it.

Staff members should also be aware of any signs of extremist views of any kind within the school, whether from internal sources – students, members of staff, or governors - or external sources – the local community, external agencies or individuals. Students see this school as a safe place where they can explore controversial issues safely and our teachers must understand that it is their duty to make certain they facilitate and encourage this.

Staff members are advised to maintain an attitude of ‘it could happen here’. When concerned about the welfare of a child, staff members should always act in the interests of the child.
A child missing from an education setting is a potential indicator of abuse or neglect. Staff members should follow the school’s procedures for dealing with children who go missing, particularly on repeat occasions. They should act to identify any risk of abuse or neglect, including sexual abuse or exploitation. More information can be found later in this policy about children who run away or go missing from home or care.
If staff members have concerns about a child, they should raise these with the DSL. This includes situations of abuse that may involve staff members. The DSL will usually decide whether to make a referral to children’s social care, although any staff member can refer their concerns to Children’s Social Care directly on 0161 234 5001.
Where a child and family would benefit from co-ordinated support from more than one agency (for example, education, health, housing, police), an inter-agency assessment will be conducted. These assessments, undertaken by a lead professional (teacher, special educational needs co-ordinator, General Practitioner (GP), family support worker, and/or health visitor) will identify what help the child and family require to prevent needs escalating to a point where intervention would be needed via a statutory assessment under the Children Act 1989. See the Manchester Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) information on www.manchesterscb.org
A concern is when you are troubled about a child’s welfare and you have reasonable cause to suspect a child is suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm, or if it involves the child’s safety and well-being.

If at any point there is a risk of immediate serious harm to a child, a referral should be made to Children’s Social Care immediately on 0161 234 5001. Anybody can make a referral. If the child’s situation does not appear to be improving, the staff member with concerns should press for re-consideration. Concerns should always lead to help for the child at some point.

It is important for children to receive the right help at the right time to address risks and prevent issues escalating. Research and Serious Case Reviews have repeatedly shown the dangers of failing to take effective action. Poor practice includes failing to act on and refer the early signs of abuse and neglect, poor record keeping, failing to listen to the views of the child, failing to reassess concerns when situations do not improve, sharing information too slowly and a lack of challenge to those who appear not to be taking action.
SAFER WORKING PRACTICES
The school has regard to the underpinning principles of the Guidance for Safer Working Practices 2015:


  • The welfare of the child is paramount

  • Staff must understand their responsibilities to safeguard and promote the welfare of students

  • Staff are responsible for their own actions and behaviour and should avoid any conduct which would lead any reasonable person to question their motivation and intentions

  • Staff should work and be seen to work in an open and transparent way

  • Staff should acknowledge that deliberately invented or malicious allegations are extremely rare and that all concerns should be reported and recorded

  • Staff should discuss and/or take promptly from the headteacher if they have acted in a way which may give rise to concern

  • Staff should apply the same professional standards regardless of culture, disability, gender, language, racial origin, religious belief and sexual orientation

  • Staff should not consume or be under the influence of alcohol or any substance, including prescribed medication which may affect their ability to care for children
  • Staff should be aware that breaches of the law and other professional guidelines could result in disciplinary action being taken against them, criminal action, and/or other proceedings, including barring by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) from working in a regulated activity, or for acts of serious misconduct, prohibition from teaching by the National College of Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)


  • Staff and managers should continually monitor and review practice to ensure this guidance is followed

  • Staff should be aware of and understand this school’s Child Protection Policy, arrangements for managing allegations against staff, staff Code of Conduct and Discipline Policy, Whistle Blowing procedure and Manchester SCB procedures.

  • Staff should make themselves familiar with the following school documents and policies:

  • Staff Handbook

  • Anti Bullying Policy

  • Appointment of Staff Policy

  • Equal Opportunities in Employment Policy

  • Staff Code of Conduct

  • Grievance Procedure

  • Management of Staff Absence Policy

  • Staff Appraisal and Capability Policy

  • Staff Discipline Policy

  • Whistle Blowing Policy

  • Data Protection Policy

  • Fire Safety Policy

  • First Aid Policy

  • Food Hygiene Policy

  • Health and Safety Policy

  • Intimate care and Toileting Policy

  • Risk Assessment Policy

  • Anti-Bullying Policy

  • Behaviour Policy

  • Complaints Procedure

  • Confidentiality Policy

  • Equal Opportunities Policy

  • Exclusions Policy

  • Late and Uncollected Children Policy

  • Looked After Children

  • Missing Child Policy*

  • Misuse of Substances and Drugs Policy

  • Restraint Policy

  • School Trips and Educational Visits Policy

  • SEND Policy
  • Sex and Relationships Policy



KEY TRAINING AREAS

Timescale for Training

Mandatory Induction, new staff member Prior to starting at school

Child Protection Awareness, whole Every 2 years with refresher training on

staff (inc statutory Safeguarding) other year

Designated Safeguarding Lead (statutory) Every 2 years with refresher training on

other year

Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead (statutory) Every 2 years with refresher training on

other year

Safer Recruitment, Head and Deputy (statutory) Every 2 years

Prevent, all staff (statutory) Annually

Training for Governors Annually

Female Genital Mutilation Every two years

Child Sexual Exploitation Every two years

E-Safety Annually
Aims

  • To provide Staff with the framework to promote and safeguard the wellbeing of children and so ensure all statutory responsibilities are met.

  • To ensure consistent good practice across the school.

  • To demonstrate our commitment to protecting children.

Principles and Values

Children have a right to feel secure and without this provision cannot be guaranteed to learn effectively unless they do so.

All children regardless of age, gender, race, ability, sexuality, religion, culture or language have a right to be protected from harm.

All staff have a key role in the prevention of harm and have an equal responsibility to act on any suspicion or disclosure that may indicate a child is at risk of harm in accordance with the prescribed guidance.

We acknowledge that working in partnership with other agencies protects children and reduces risk and so we will engage in partnership working throughout with the child protection process to safeguard children.

Whilst the school will work openly with parents as far as possible, the school reserves the right to contact children’s social services or the police, without notifying parents if this is deemed to be in the best interests of any child.

Confidentiality
All matters relating to child protection will be treated as confidential and only shared as instructed in the ‘Working Together’ guidance.

Information will only be shared with agencies with whom we have a statutory duty to share or with individuals within the school who ‘need to know’.



All staff need to be aware that they cannot promise a child to keep a disclosure confidential.
Definitions
Child Protection is an aspect of safeguarding, but is focused on how we respond to children who have been significantly harmed or are at risk of significant harm.
The term Staff applies to all those working for or on behalf of the school, full time or part time, in either a paid or voluntary capacity. This also includes parents and governors.
Child refers to all young people who have not yet reached their 18th birthday. On the whole, this will apply to pupils of our school; however, the policy will extend to visiting children and students from other establishments
Parent refers to birth parents and other adults in a parenting role for example adoptive parents, step parents, guardians and foster carers.
Abuse refers to neglect, physical, emotional or sexual abuse or any combination of these. Parents, carers and other people can harm children either by direct or indirect acts and/or by failing to provide proper care. Explanations of these are given within the procedure document.
We will invoke Child Protection Procedures where necessary.
All staff members must read the content of this policy. The Teacher Standards 2012 states that teachers, including head teachers, should safeguard children’s wellbeing and maintain public trust in the teaching profession as part of their professional duties.

The DSL and Deputy and the Safeguarding Governor all undertake regular standard and lead training. All staff are updated on child protection regularly and are retrained annually in the Autumn Term by the DSL. New staff are trained at Induction.

All staff must staff read Part 1 and Appendix A, ‘Further Information’, Keeping Children Safe in Education (Sept 2016). Staff are required to complete and pass the KCSIE PACE.
The Governors recognise the need to build constructive links with childcare agencies, and will work with social care, the police, health services and other services to promote the welfare of children and protect them from harm. Accordingly, these guidelines have been prepared in consultation with the PCCA’s Churches Protection Advisory Service, (CCPAS) and Christian Education Europe.
The Governors are committed to:


  • Listening to, relating effectively to and valuing children and young people whilst ensuring their protection within school activities.

  • Ensuring safeguarding is taught as part of providing a broad and balanced curriculum.

  • Employing the expertise of the staff when reviewing safeguarding policies and providing opportunities for staff to contribute to and shape safeguarding arrangements and the child protection policy.

  • Encouraging and supporting parents/carers

  • Ensuring that staff members are given support and training

  • Having a system for dealing with concerns about possible abuse

  • Maintaining good links with the statutory child care authorities

Staff responsibilities
All staff have a key role to play in safeguarding children, identifying concerns early and providing help for children. They will:



  • Establish and maintain an environment where children feel secure, are encouraged to talk and are listened to.

  • Ensure children know that there are adults in the school whom they can approach if they are worried about any problems.
  • Plan opportunities within the curriculum for children to develop the skills they need to assess and manage risk appropriately and keep themselves safe.


  • Attend training in order to be aware of and alert to the signs of abuse.

  • Maintain an attitude of “it could happen here” with regards to safeguarding.

  • Record their concerns if they are worried that a child is being abused and report these to the relevant person as soon as practical that day.

  • If the disclosure is an allegation against a member of staff they will follow procedures (See Appendix 4).

  • Follow the procedures set out by the Manchester Safeguarding the Child Board (MSCB) and take account of guidance issued by the Department for Education (DfE).

  • Support pupils in line with their child protection plan.

  • Treat information with confidentiality but never promise to “keep a secret”.

  • Notify DSL of any child on a child protection plan who has unexplained absence.

All staff members have a responsibility to provide a safe environment in which children can learn. They have a responsibility to identify children who may be in need of extra help or who are suffering, are vulnerable to, are likely to suffer, or at risk of, significant harm. Staff have a responsibility to review and monitor the list of these students on a regular basis all staff members then have a responsibility to take appropriate action, working with other services as needed, including Early Help.

Where a child is suffering significant harm, or is likely to do so, action will be taken to protect that child. Action will also be taken to promote the welfare of a child in need of additional support, even if they are not suffering harm or are at immediate risk.


See Working Together to Safeguard Children Feb 2015 (updated Feb 2017).

Early Help is used to describe the process of taking action early and as soon as possible to tackle problems emerging for children, young people and their families. Effective help can occur at any point in a child or young person's life. Staff should be able to identify the vulnerable children in school who need who need this level of support. These children should be identified and monitored. Staff need to understand the difference between a safeguarding concern and a child in immediate danger or at significant risk of harm. 

In addition to working with the DSL, staff members should be aware that they might be asked to support social workers to take decisions about individual children.

All staff members should make themselves aware of the systems within the school that support safeguarding, which are explained in the staff induction. This includes:
Child protection policy; staff code of conduct and who is the Designated Safeguarding Lead (Beccy Judson).
Staff members should be aware of the signs of abuse and neglect in order to identify cases of children who may be in need of help or protection. Knowing what to look for is vital to the early identification of abuse and neglect. If staff members are unsure they should always speak to children’s social care.

Staff members should be aware of any signs of extremist views of any kind in our school, whether from internal sources – students, staff or governors - or external sources - school community, external agencies or individuals. Students should see the school as a safe place where they can explore controversial issues safely and where teachers encourage and facilitate this and understand they have a duty to ensure this happens.


Staff members are advised to maintain an attitude of ‘it could happen here’ where safeguarding is concerned. When concerned about the welfare of a child, staff members should always act in the interests of the child.
Senior management team responsibilities:


  • Contribute to inter-agency working in line with guidance (Working Together 2015)

  • Provide a co-ordinated offer of early help when additional needs of children are identified

  • Work with children’s social care, support their assessment and planning processes including the school’s attendance at conference and core group meetings

  • Carry out tasks delegated by the governing body such as training of staff; safer recruitment; maintaining a single central register
  • Provide support and advice on all matters pertaining to safeguarding and child protection to all staff regardless of their position within the school


  • Treat any information shared by staff or pupils with respect and confidentiality whilst following procedures

  • Ensure that allegations or concerns against staff are dealt with in accordance with guidance from the DfE, MSCB, and Manchester City Council (MCC)

Governing body responsibilities


  • Ensure that the school has effective Safeguarding policies & procedures including a Child Protection Policy and a Code of Staff Conduct

  • Ensure that an annual (and termly) Safeguarding Audit is carried out

  • Recruitment, selection and induction follow Safer Recruitment practice.

  • Allegations against staff are dealt with according to procedures.

  • A member of the senior staff team is designated as designated safeguarding lead (DSL) and this is recorded in their job description

  • Staff have been trained appropriately and this is updated in line with guidance

  • Any safeguarding deficiencies or weaknesses are remedied without delay

  • They have identified a nominated governor for allegations against the headteacher

Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL)
The School Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) is the first point of contact for any member of the school staff who has a concern about the safety and well-being of a student.
The DSL does not need to be a member of the teaching staff but should be a recognised member of the Senior Management Team with the required status and authority to carry out the requirements of the role.
Depending on the size and requirements of the school a Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead should be available. The deputy is the first point of contact in the absence of the DSL to avoid any unnecessary delays in responding to a student’s needs.

The DSL and Deputy and Safeguarding Governor are required to undertake child protection training, standard and lead every two years and should supplement this training by attending workshops where available, at least annually.

Responsibilities of the DSL
In addition to the role played by staff and the senior leadership team the DSL will:


  • Assist the governing body in fulfilling their responsibilities under sections 175 and 157 of the Education Act 2002

  • Attend initial standard and lead training for the role and repeating every two years, refreshing this annually.

  • Ensure every member of staff and all volunteers know who the DSL is, is aware of the DSL role and has their contact details

  • Ensure all staff and volunteers understand their responsibilities in being alert to the signs of abuse and responsibility for referring any concerns to the DSL

  • Ensure that whole school training takes place annually and regular updates are given as needed so that staff and volunteers can fulfil their responsibilities

  • Ensure any members of staff joining the school outside of this training schedule receive training in Safeguarding and Child Protection during Induction

  • Keep written records of child protection concerns securely and separately from the main pupil file and use these records to assess the likelihood of risk

  • Ensure that copies of safeguarding records are transferred (separately from pupil files) when a child transfers school

  • Ensure that where a pupil transfers school and is on a child protection plan or is a child looked after, the information is passed to the new school immediately and that the child’s social worker is informed

  • Link with the MSCB to make sure staff are aware of training opportunities and the latest local policies on safeguarding
  • Develop, implement and review procedures in our school that enable the identification and reporting of all cases, or suspected cases, of abuse


Skills needed by DSL
The DSL needs the skill and ability to:


  • Identify signs of abuse.

  • Refer concerns to the appropriate investigating agencies

  • Maintain detailed and accurate written records of child protection concerns and ensure they are kept securely

  • Offer support, advice and give a level of expertise to all members of the school staff team

  • Ensure all staff have access to and understand the school Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy and Procedures.

  • Provide child protection training as part of the induction for all new staff in the school and take the lead in annual staff training and regular updating of staff.

  • Be responsible with the Head Teacher for the annual review and update of the School Safeguarding Policy and the presentation of this to the Governing Body.

  • Ensure that a copy of the School Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy is available for any parents who request to see it.

  • Ensure that the Head Teacher, the Safeguarding Governor and Chair of Governors are updated on a regular basis about all issues and child protection investigations.

  • Ensure that relevant safeguarding files are copied and forwarded appropriately when a child/young person transfers to another school.

  • Be part of the team who review and monitor any causes of concern relating to students which are raised in school.

Raising concerns

If staff members have concerns about a child they should raise these with the DSL, or in her absence with the Deputy DSL. This includes situations of abuse that may involve staff members. If this involves a member of staff related to the Headteacher (who is also the Deputy DSL), in the absence of the DSL, concerns should be raised with the Safeguarding Governor. If concerns directly involve the Headteacher, they should be raised with the Safeguarding Governor. The DSL will usually decide whether to make a referral to children’s social care, although any staff member can refer their concerns to Children’s Social Care directly. Safeguarding concerns about the proprietor should go straight to the Local Authority Designated Officer (the LADO).

Where a child and family would benefit from coordinated support from more than one agency (e.g. education, health, housing, police) an inter-agency assessment will be conducted. These assessments, undertaken by a lead professional (a teacher, special educational needs coordinator, GP, family support worker, and/or health visitor), will identify what help the child and family require to prevent needs escalating to a point where intervention would be needed via a statutory assessment under the Children Act 1989. See Manchester’s Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub information on www.manchesterscb.org.uk

If, at any point, there is a risk of serious harm to a child a referral should be made to Children’s Social Care, 0161 234 5001, or 999 immediately, as appropriate. Anybody can make a referral.

If the child’s situation does not appear to be improving, the staff member with concerns should press for re-consideration. Concerns should always lead to help for the child at some point.


It is important for children to receive the right help at the right time to address risks and prevent issues escalating. Research and Serious Case Reviews have repeatedly shown the dangers of failing to take effective action.

Poor practice includes:

Failing to act on and refer the early signs of abuse and neglect, poor record keeping, failing to listen to the views of the child, failing to re-assess concerns when situations do not improve, sharing information too slowly and a lack of challenge to those who appear not to be taking action.



IMPORTANT CONTACT DETAILS
Safeguarding incidents could happen anywhere and staff should be alert to possible concerns being raised in this school.

Safeguarding concerns about adults in the school should be made to the DSL, or to the Headteacher, the Deputy DSL, (providing the concerns do not relate to any member of the Headteacher’s family). Concerns about the Headteacher’s family members should go to the DSL and the Safeguarding Governor. Concerns about the Headteacher herself should go to the Safeguarding Governor (not the Chair of Governors who is a relative) who will immediately contact the Local Authority Designated Officer (the LADO).

The Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) is Beccy Judson. Her role is to provide support and direction to staff members to carry out their safeguarding duties and to liaise closely with other services such as children’s social care, the local authority designated officer (formerly LADO), the DBS and the police when managing referrals, as well as working closely with the principal. She is also the E-Safety Safeguarding Lead and the Lead for Looked After Children.
The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead is Brenda Lewis. Her role is to provide support to the Lead and be available if the Lead is unavailable.
The Safeguarding Governor is Dr Bamidele Oyebande. His role in Safeguarding is to take the lead in dealing with allegations of abuse made against the Head Teacher. He checks the termly Safeguarding Report and audit.
The Head Teacher is Brenda Lewis. Her role in Safer Recruitment is to ensure that the school operates safe recruitment procedures that all appropriate checks are carried out on staff and volunteers who work with the children.
The Deputy Head is Justine Golamhossen. Her role is deputy Safer Recruitment lead.
The Chair of Governors is Dr Philip Lewis.
Independent Governor is Mr Nigel Steele.
All staff members may raise concerns directly with Children’s Social Care, 0161 234 5001.
To contact the following people, in the first instance please call the school office,

0161 834 4214:


Designated Safeguarding Lead for Child Protection, (DSL) Beccy Judson, 07786228508, beccyjudson@hotmail.co.uk
Deputy DSL, Brenda Lewis, 07877783820 ebrendalewis@hotmail.co.uk

Safeguarding Governor, Bamidele Oyebande, 07990594098, dele@deleoye.com

Independent Governor, Nigel Steele, 07886924126, nigel@quoakle.com
Chair of Governors, Philip Lewis, 07917666033, drpslewis@hotmail.co.uk
Headteacher and Safer Recruitment Lead, Brenda Lewis, 07877783820, ebrendalewis@hotmail.co.uk

For the DSL to raise an early concern regarding a child or a family: contact the Early Help Hub:


To submit an EHA form, send securely and with Parents’ written consent using ‘The Agreement’ to Early Help North

0161 234 1973

eha@manchester.gov.uk

further information:



earlyhelpnorth@manchester.gov.uk



For the DSL to raise a significant concern regarding a child or a family, at Levels of Need 1-4, she will contact the Manchester Contact Centre, within 24 hours, by using the email mcsreply@manchester.gov.uk
If the Level of Need is Level 5, the DSL will ring the Manchester Contact Centre immediately, on 0161 234 4214.

In an emergency, or if the child is in immediate danger, the DSL will ring 999.
For advice, the DSL should contact the Manchester Contact Centre on 0161 234 5001.
For further information on Levels of Need and Response please see:

MSCB Multi-Agency Levels of Need and Response Framework on the mscb website on www.manchesterscb.org.uk

Manchester Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO): Majella O’Hagan, the LADO is contact via the email address, qualityassurance@manchester.gov.uk , postal address: Ground Floor, R and D Block, Wenlock Way Offices, Wenlock Way, West Gorton, M12 5DH)

The school will work with the Local Authority Designated Officer as appropriate. The LA’S Designated Officer provides advice and guidance to employers and voluntary organisations (including schools) that have concerns about a person working or volunteering with children and young people who may have behaved inappropriately or where information has been received that may constitute an allegation.
Where the DSL has concerns which can be managed by the school, she should complete and submit an Early Help assessment form (See Appendix 9 for details, p93).
[For additional advice, the DSL may contact: CCPAS: (Lo-call): 0845 120 45 50 or (STD): 01322 517817]
All staff members may raise concerns directly with Children’s Social Care services
To make a Safeguarding/Child Protection Referral without going through the DSL or Deputy, a member of staff or volunteer may also contact:


  • The NSPCC Helpline: 0808 800 5000

  • The NSPCC whistle-blowing helpline: 0800 028 0285

  • The Police: 101 to report crime and other concerns that do not require an emergency response; 999 when there is danger to life or when violence is being used or threatened


N.B. The exception to this is in cases of known FGM where there is a mandatory requirement for the teacher to report directly to the police (See section below on p16 on FGM)

See Appendix 9 for full contact list


TIMESCALES

An Initial Assessment should be initiated by the DSL or Deputy DSL within 24 hours of receipt of a referral and completed in a minimum of 10 working days. However the time to complete will depend on the case and the other agencies involved.

An initial assessment is deemed to be completed once the assessment has been discussed with the child and family (or caregivers) and the DSL (or Deputy DSL) has viewed and authorised the assessment.
The initial assessment period may be very brief if the criteria for initiating Local Authority involvement are met, i.e. it is suspected that the child is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm and a strategy discussion should take place.
Any extension to time-scale should be authorised by the DSL or Deputy DSL, with reasons recorded and any delay must be consistent with the welfare of the child.
See Appendix 5, Referral Flowchart.

CHILD PROTECTION POLICY
The Governors recognise that many children and young people today are the victims of neglect, and physical, sexual and emotional abuse, including extremism and radicalisation. Accordingly, the Governors have adopted the policy contained in this document. This policy sets out agreed guidelines relating to the following areas:


  • The Prevent Duty

  • Definitions of abuse

  • Responding to allegations of abuse, including those made against teachers in the school

  • Appointing teachers and assistants

  • Supervision of activities and practice issues

  • Helping victims of abuse

  • Working with offenders

  • Safer Recruitment, including the level of DBS checks that will be undertaken for volunteers and trustees

THE PREVENT DUTY
From July 1st, 2015, all schools must have due regard to the need to prevent people being drawn into terrorism.
The Government’s definition of extremism is:

Vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs; and/or calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas’.

The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) therefore places clear duties on providers to keep children safe and promote their welfare. To protect children in our care, we must be alert to any safeguarding and child protection issues in the child’s life at home or elsewhere.

As a school and EYFS provider, we:



  • Assess the risk of children being drawn into terrorism.

  • Demonstrate that we are protecting children and young people from being drawn into terrorism by having robust safeguarding policies.

  • Ensure that safeguarding arrangements take into account the policies and procedures of the Manchester Safeguarding Children Board.

  • Train staff to provide them with the knowledge and confidence to identify children at risk of being drawn into terrorism, and to challenge extremist ideas

  • Give the children a moral framework and teach them about British values

  • Ensure children are safe from terrorist and extremist material when accessing the internet

  • The school holds a separate Preventing Extremism and Radicalisation Policy.

The full Government Prevent Strategy can be viewed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/97976/prevent-strategy-review.pdf


The full Government Prevent Duty (2015) can be viewed at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/439598/prevent-duty-departmental-advice-v6.pdf
The Role of the Curriculum
We will work to ensure that students will be skilled and equipped to be resilient and resist involvement in extreme or radical activities. Therefore we recognize the need to build resilience in our students to make them less vulnerable.

We therefore provide a broad and balanced curriculum within which we aim to support students and which includes spiritual, moral, social and cultural development (SMSC). SMSC development is promoted through all our subjects and through the ethos of our school where development of positive attitudes and values is central to all we do.

Values underpinning public life in the UK have been summarized as: democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect, and the tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs, and none. It is important that our students understand this and we work to achieve it through many different approaches, including through the curriculum. This, from the Pre-School to Level 12, supports our students to be and become responsible citizens and it prepares them for adult life, living and working in a Britain which is diverse and changing.
Our goal is to build mutual respect and understanding and to promote the use of dialogue not violence as a form of conflict resolution. We therefore use a curriculum which includes:


  • Citizenship programme

  • Open discussion and debate

  • Work on anti-violence and a restorative approach addressed throughout the curriculum

  • Focused teaching and specific educational programmes

We will also work with local partners, families and communities in our efforts to ensure our school understands and embraces the local context and the effort in challenging extremist views and to assist in the broadening of our students’ experiences and horizons. We will help and support students who may be vulnerable to such influences as part of our wider safeguarding responsibilities and where we believe a student is being directly affected by extremist materials or influences, we will ensure that that student is offered mentoring.


SIGNIFICANT HARM

Some children are in need because they are suffering or likely to suffer significant harm. The Children Act 1989 introduced the concept of significant harm as the threshold that justifies compulsory intervention in family life in the best interests of children. Decisions about significant harm should be informed by a careful assessment of the child’s circumstances and discussion between statutory agencies and with the child and family.

DEFINITIONS OF ABUSE (See Appendix 8)
The following definitions of child abuse are taken from the document ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’ (2016):
Abuse

A form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institution or community setting by those known to them or, more rarely, by others (e.g. via the internet). They may be abused by an adult or adults, or another child or children.




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