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Disaster Management Community






Decentralization Community



Solution Exchange for the Disaster Management Community

Solution Exchange for Decentralization Community

Consolidated Reply


 

Query: Partnership between SHGs and Local Government for Disaster Risk Reduction- Experiences; Advice.



Compiled by G. Padmanabhan and Swati Dogra, Resource Persons; Rani Sahay, Moderator and Aditi Malhotra, Research Associate

Issue Date: 27 May 2013

From P. Chandran, Swayam Shikshan Prayog, Mumbai

Posted 10 March 2013

Empowered and informed women groups have demonstrated that they could take a lead in local development and Disaster Risk Reduction. Swayam Shikshan Prayog (SSP) in Mumbai works with grassroots women self-help groups across India to promote community resilience. In Bihar, SSP supports women SHGs who are involved in addressing disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation practices. These women groups have taken a lead in building community resilience. They guide village communities in updating the knowledge of task force teams, arranging medical kits, preparing dry food items and ensuring sustainability through grain banks etc., especially before the monsoon season. In order to mitigate risks, the SHGs have initiated vulnerability mapping and identified sustainable livelihood measures for community resilience in the flood prone districts of Bihar (Darbhanga and Supaul).

However, their efforts are plagued by several critical challenges, such as (i) inadequate access to information  on (district, block and village) government schemes, budgets and development activities, (ii) limited cooperation from elected representatives across all three tiers or not enough recognition to the potential of SHGs, (iii) bottlenecks due to corruption and inefficiency (iv) concentration of resources in limited hands (dominant groups) and (v) lack of a clear policy/guidelines on role, function and resource allocation to SHGs for local development.
We do feel that there have been efforts across villages in India where SHGs and local governments as well as administration have partnered for addressing local vulnerability and disaster risk reduction. In this context, we request members of Disaster Management community and Decentralisation community to share:


  • Experiences of SHGs working in collaboration with local government and administration for accessing resources and programmes towards building community resilience




  • How SHG’s and local NGOs/CBOs can create a platform for partnership and dialogue with the local government

Experiences and advice shared by you would help SSP to fine tune its strategies to support women SHGs to overcome the challenges they face routinely.

Responses were received, with thanks, from

  1. Arabinda Chaudhury, Education Department, Khowai District, Tripura (Response 1; Response 2)

  2. Rudra Prasanna Rath, UNICEF-SIH&FW, Orissa (Response 1; Response 2)
  3. Tanushree Verma, Consultant, National Disaster Management Authority, New Delhi


  4. Pradipta Mohanty, Independent Consultant, Disaster Management, Orissa

  5. Deepa S. Prabhu, Independent Consultant (knowledge solutions), Mumbai

  6. Bibhuti Bhushan Gadanayak, UNDMT, New Delhi

  7. Asha Kiran, C-HEART, Kottayam

  8. Abha Mishra, UNDP, New Delhi

  9. Annie George, BEDROC, Nagapattinam

  10. Subhasish Debnath, UNDP, West Bengal

  11. Bibhu Prasad Mohanty, Jindal Steel and Power Ltd., Patratu, Jharkhand

  12. Shyamal Santra, Ranchi, Jharkhand 

  13. N. M. Prusty, CDDMASS- A Strategy Center, New Delhi

  14. Suresh Kumar S., Chief Scientist and Adviser, CSIR-NIIST, Trivandrum

  15. Ravishwar Sinha, Independent Consultant, Patna

  16. Pradeep Mohapatra, Udyama, Bhubaneshwar

  17. Ranjani K.  Murthy, Gender Consultant, Chennai

  18. Navin Anand, Solution Exchange, UNDP, New Delhi

  19. Subrata Sarkar, Gramin Vikas Trust, West Bengal

  20. Nagar M. Verma, Saritsa Foundation, Mumbai

  21. Anjan Bag, Caritas India, Bihar

  22. Jitendra Kumar, Navjagriti, Saran, Bihar


Further contributions are welcome!

Summary of Responses

Comparative Experiences

Related Resources

Responses in Full

Summary of Responses

SHGs have been engaged by different departments for undertaking various activities and are now playing a catalytic role both as a service provider as well as service receiver which further contributes to community resilience in the long run in the face of disasters. The SHGs can play an invaluable role not only in immediate post-disaster situations but can be excellent resource centres for disaster preparedness as well. As people’s organisation at community level, both the Self-Help Groups and Panchayati Raj Institutes can act together towards bringing desired changes in their own community as the development objectives of both the institutions are same except for the administrative powers that the PRIs exercise. SHGs have now become an important vehicle for Disaster Risk Reduction and there are many examples to substantiate this.

At the grass root level, besides cooperatives, SHGs /Joint liability groups and their federations exists in large number. These are institutions of the people having limited resources and therefore they are highly susceptible to a range of risks factors. Besides economic disasters, they also face natural disasters and often lose their limited resources. It is seen that the relationship between the local governments and networks of SHGs, federations and NGOs is inorganic as they connect for certain purpose and then disconnect. Members suggested having a regular linkage and partnership between Local self-governments and SHGs and their federations for creating self-sustaining systems at various levels for disaster risk reduction. As per NABARD’s report 2011-2012, there are 79.60 lakh Self-help groups that are linked with banks for savings. Out of these SHGs 62.99 lakh are all women groups. More details are available at the following weblink. As per a conservative assessment each group includes not less than 10-12 members and there are still large numbers of other SHGs which are not yet linked with banks for savings. Hence not less than 8 crore households are associated with SHG movement. Considering an average size of the family as 5, the total number of people connected directly or indirectly through SHGs will come to 40 crore, which is huge in terms of reach. However, despite the large number there is no national federation of SHGs yet.
Regarding experiences of SHGs working in collaboration with local government and administration for accessing resources and programmes towards building community resilience, members in their response suggested the following;


  • The Self- Help Groups (SHGs) can engage with local Panchayat strategically and act as a ‘pressure group’ as well ‘development partner’ at local level. Discussants shared their experiences of SHGs-PRIs engagement with a two way relationship; SHGs helping and empowering the Panchayat; and taking issues to Gram Sabha for approvals and working in collaboration with the local government. Participants in their responses shared experiences of creating peer pressure groups advocating for the issues in question and SHG advocacy groups have achieved success in mobilizing benefits in favour of the community members. The pressure groups have played a critical role in amplifying the voices of community members. Women groups have been liaising with Panchayat Representatives and government officials to link up with government schemes/programs.


  • Members reported SHG groups have been linked to banks and ensured that all SHGs have a bank account. Have also linked their partners SHGs with government programs such as NABARD to build community resilience.

  • Active SHG groups have collaborated to form cluster or federations which then have linkages with bank and Panchayat. As a larger collective they lobby for important mitigation activities like installation of uplifted hand pumps for fresh drinking water during flood. actively taking part in the VDMCs and DMT trainings in First Aid, Shelter Management, Disaster Mental Health/Counselling and to address the gender sensitive issues

  • A strong planning process enabled the women members to take up the issues to Panchayat. The platform of Gram Sabha was used by women to take up their plan in a holistic manner. This has enabled particularly the women SHGs to get approval of Gram Panchayat. Women SHGs have empowered the PRIs to implement, monitor, plan implementation process. It is interesting to note that CCA and DRR actions were also included in Panchayat planning through a strong SHG and Community group network through Gram Sabha planning process. Women and men in the community formed task forces on early warning, rescue, relief, first aid, and began receiving training.  Task forces conducted mock drill every year as a part of preparation. The women developed easy access to administration and were enabled to participate in the local development processes from which they have been excluded for long due to their gender identity.
  • Since, SHGs can easily reach family level and can conduct dialogue with the community; it was recognised as key stakeholders in Disaster Mitigation, Preparedness and Response activities by the PRIs in Tripura and in Rayagada as an effective means for social mobilization and even inter-personal communication. They reached out to the larger community for activities like social mapping of villages, developing seasonal calendar of the year when the area is prone to hazards like flood. They also supported the PRI members to build awareness and develop the Village Disaster Management Plan.


  • Members reported experiences from Odisha where local government partnered with SHGs for managing the entire chain of mid-day meal (MDM). This experience can come in handy in providing nutritious foods to the children after the disasters as the community knows what exactly are required for children at the time of disasters.

  • Several discussants mentioned about the critical support provided by SHGs in relief distribution through their Grain Banks and stored food items placed at higher levels. The local government make use of this facility available with SHGs and provide additional relief through the SHGs to the community.

  • In Odisha, SHGs bargained with the government by offering a partial contribution of labour for developmental activities such as construction and cash for risk transfer mechanism for more than 10,000 households under BPL category. This experience was successful as the pressure on the government was dramatically reduced because ex-gratia amount payable in case of death due to disaster is much higher.

  • In Odisha SHG groups working closely with NGO partners have had good experience of leveraging resource from the mainstream development programmes. Partnership with PRIs has been built by facilitating Panchayat in their activities. Substantial resources have been leveraged by demanding work, effective negotiation and catalysing on the part of partner NGOs and SHGs. Positive attitude gradually changed Panchayat’s attitude as they gradually understood the SHGs purpose and commitment. In Nadia district, West Bengal SHGs engaged with the Panchayat by ensuring new livelihood options like production of life jackets and sanitary pads that can be used both before and after disasters. These SHGs have been linked up with NABARD, local PRI and district administrative officials by the local NGO SMS.
  • SHGs have been actively involved in understanding the micro-level vulnerabilities of the village. With their intimate knowledge of the village they are able to mark houses which have elders, physically or mentally challenged dependents, socio-economically weak and marginalised etc. Their knowledge and experience enriches the vulnerability map giving precise information on households requiring priority external support in the aftermath of a disaster. This knowledge is also used for enhancing resilience of the most vulnerable. The SHGs have also supported for ensuring that the Social Security mechanisms in place, like the old age pension, disability pension, widow pension etc. are accessed by the identified vulnerable population.


  • SHGs can also be used as "Catalysts for Change" for improving the reach of "development" and build resilience. On these lines, one of the respondent mentioned experimenting a Community Report Card System where the SHGs regularly assess the quality of the services heavily depended upon by the communities, like health, education and Public Delivery Mechanisms.

  • SHGs can also be given the responsibility of keeping buffer stock of grains and dress materials for their local area of operation. This would ensure equity, quick response and dresses that fit and are appropriate. Once a year, after the threat of the disaster passes, the SHG should be allowed to sell the material and restock. This will also provide them with a business as most SHGs would have tailors, petty shop keepers etc.

  • In Bengal, from hesitation to acceptance to becoming a partner— the Panchayat has transformed its role over the period. The Panchayat forwarded to the Panchayat Samity all the approved DM plans for approval of necessary funds. The Block administration has made it a practice to hold a preparatory meeting every year with the SHGs and Panchayats together. The administration listens to the voice of the community during their annual contingency plans and it has now become a practice to invite the SHG Cluster leaders and NGOs to the meetings to discuss District contingency plans.
  • In West Bengal, as a result of the CBDP work, the Women SHG members have become active in Gram Sansad meetings. While they were only vaguely aware of the Gram Sansad process earlier, they now form the majority in the meetings. While attendance in Gram Sansad meetings earlier was barely sufficient, now it has gone up to 50-60%. Moreover, the women attend the meetings fully prepared with their own agenda that apart from CBDP issues also includes development initiatives in the village such as school facilities, sanitation, routine immunisation and more specifically the government’s poverty alleviations programmes that are implemented by the Panchayat. The Panchayat welcomed the strengthening of the Gram Sansad process by not only sharing the budgets and expenditures but also take the pain of explaining the government programmes and various quotas for the poor.


  • Legal engagement with PRI for Project Implementation has been experimented successfully in West Bengal under which the NGO and local Panchayat signed a ‘Social Contract’ on non-judicial stamp paper containing the modalities of engagement. Both the organisations agreed to share their resources and Panchayat agreed to share administrative cost and office space. The local NGO staff were put under the direct supervision of the Panchayat. The good practices of this initiative can be replicated in building disaster resilient communities particularly in areas of identifying vulnerable groups; engagement with PRIs and SHGs, sharing of resources and community based monitoring.

  • Members also shared initiatives involving coordination with local administration and PRIs for generating awareness on social security schemes; drawing support and leveraging resources from line departments; handholding PRIs/ CBOs/Groups on the implementation process; organizing capacity building programs for reducing gap; resolving local issues; promotion of model villages; DRR & community resilience; and creating avenues for further networking. The SHG groups in Odisha have also worked towards opportunity scanning for micro linkages; develop a culture of humanitarian response; informing local authority, PRIs and state disaster management authorities towards quality service delivery for replication and sustainability. The SHGs have been able to achieve exemplary results towards community resilience by capitalizing livelihood opportunity offered by NREGS in drought situations.

SHGs have emerged as the most viable community institutions to foster development. Regarding creating platform for partnership and dialogue between SHG’s and the local government the discussants suggested the following;

In order to take development governance to the grassroots, synergy and linkage between PRI and SHGs are indeed essential and mutually beneficial. One of the members suggested strategizing clustering the SHGs at the PRI level so that the cluster groups can act as development partners of the PRI. Cooption arrangements (through legislation) has also been suggested for representatives of various types of SHGs to be a part of the PRI body so that PRIs gradually gets transformed to an empowered development institution at the grassroot. In the absence of development character, the PRIs are fast becoming political rallying point for political parties. The cooption could help change the character of the PRIs with elections taking place on development grounds rather than on political agenda. PRI-SHG linkage could also give rise to good grassroot leadership that would bring in true grassroots democracy. Linkage of PRIs with the SHGs would help PRIs have an appropriate platform for execution of development projects (the SHG partners/ federation to become the executive arm of PRIs). Effective SHG partnership could also be built by creating a national network of SHGs and their federations for DRR, creating ‘resilience fund’ in SHGs and federations, forming spearhead groups within federations for dialogue with local government, linking SHG federations to the flagship government schemes and programmes and finally to use the CDO office at the district level to build a platform to partner with local government for DRR. Some of the other suggestions included;



  • federation of SHGs to be formed at block and district level which could then dialogue with PRIs and Government. (Individual groups may not be as successful in negotiating their roles in all phases as the federations would; especially for capacity building of SHGs, agencies like DRDA/ICDS/NABARD etc. have funds and there is a need to integrate DRR concerns.)

  • engaging with SHG confederations/ collectives at block and district level

  • SHG federation to remain free from political interference

  • mechanism to be established for legal acceptance of SHGs

  • legal authority to be given to federation members, such as right to vote and evaluate

  • defining role of SHGs in DRR at local level especially accessibility to social security mechanism and development planning activities

  • identifying role of SHGs and CBOs in delivering innovation for livelihood enhancement and educating the community for Insuring Assets.

  • Panchayat to form Local level Advisory committee or Development Support Panel using SHGs as authorized parallel supporting body to the PRIs

  • power to participate in DRR/developmental planning

  • membership of representatives from relevant sectors functioning in the community

The role of SHGs is indispensable in building community resilience. However, there’s a need to respect the boundaries in which the local SHG groups work and not over stretch it by overburdening all the roles to a small group of community members rather strengthen them to support themselves first and others later—the basic survival ethos. A strong PRI-SHGs linkage would ensure that the frontline government functionaries are more responsive to people and common cause. If we agree that decentralization is the way forward, then the SHGs can play an invaluable role in effective disaster management and in enhancing the resilience of the local communities.  


Comparative Experiences

Tripura


Using the social capital of SHGs (from
Arabinda Chaudhury, Education Department, Khowai District, Tripura)

Keeping in mind the in-depth outreach of SHGs Government of Tripura facilitated SHGs and PRIs to work together initiative to utilize their social mobilization skills in a systematic and planned way for community disaster risk reduction.


Orissa
SHG confederations working on Disaster Management (from
Rudra Prasanna Rath, UNICEF-SIH&FW, Orissa)

In Keonjar and Cuttack district, Orissa Disaster management Authority (OSDMA), organized consultations with SHG collectives at block and district level to discuss history of Disasters and role that women can play during and after disaster. They also discussed issues like Gender stereo-types and how these affect women in case of disasters.


SHGs in Village Disaster Management Committees (from
Pradipta Mohanty, Independent Consultant, Disaster Management, Orissa)

Rayagada is one of the tribal districts of Odisha, where women SHGs have major respondents during any kind of urgency. GoI-UNDP DRM Programme in Rayagada District of Odisha mobilized SHGs to become active members in the Village Disaster Management Committees and participate in Disaster Management Trainings. This helped SHG members to play an indispensable role in First Aid, Shelter Management, and post-Disaster Counselling.

SHGs and Panchayats work hand in hand (from Bibhuti Bhushan Gadanayak, UNDMT, New Delhi)

Banki block, Cuttack district is annually ravaged by recurrent floods. NGO, Banki Anchalika Harijan Kalyan Parishad, played brought together local SHGs and the local government under one roof so they can coordinate and divide roles for disaster management. As a result, the SHGs provide support in relief distribution through their Grain Banks especially to people in remote and poorly connected villages.

Cascading model for Disaster Management (from Bibhuti Bhushan Gadanayak, UNDMT, New Delhi)

Red Cross facilitated linkages between Odisha Shelter Disaster Management Committee and SHGs which were further divided into Household Micro Groups by. The Micro-groups along with the governments provided partial contribution of labour and cash for developmental activities.


SHGs Leveraging resources and accelerating sustainability (from Pradeep Mohapatra, Udyama, Bhubaneshwar)

Community Disaster Resilience Fund (CDRF) demonstrates community led initiatives in DRR like through collective risk mapping, identification of priorities, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Their efforts have reached to out to 52 Gram Panchayats in Cuttack, Kendrapada, Balasore, Mayurbhanj, Nuapada, Bolangir and Keonjhar Districts of Orissa where SHG groups have worked closely with NGO partners for leveraging resource from the mainstream development programmes such as MGNREGA. To read more, click here http://www.huairou.org/assets/download/nps234.pdf


http://www.preventionweb.net/files/13473_13473EOPReport1.pdf

State Government engages SHGs for nutritious food during emergencies (from Rudra Prasanna Rath, UNICEF-SIH&FW, Odisha)

In Odisha SHG members engaged in mid-day meal (MDM) are prepared by Department of Health & Family Welfare in association with Women and Child Development for providing food during disasters. as they understand the requirements of women and children at the time of disasters. “Suna Bhauni” a Quarterly news bulletin is circulated to SHG members for knowledge building, storage and discussion and helps enlighten women community members regarding their RCH rights and different schemes available for them.

Uttar Pradesh
SHG federations active in mitigation activities (From Tanushree Verma, Consultant, National Disaster Management Authority, New Delhi)

In Eastern U.P, Maharaj Ganj District flood is a recurring hazard. By trainings SHG members, linking them with PRIs and Banks, activities like social mapping, preparing seasonal calendars and developing the Village Disaster Management Plan, mitigation work like installation of uplifted hand pumps for fresh drinking water during flood etc. could be undertaken.


West Bengal
Community based disaster preparedness and Livelihood (from Abha Mishra, UNDP, New Delhi)

Looking at the potential of SHGs in disaster preparedness, Srima Mahila Samittee (SMS), an NGO based in Nadia district, West Bengal facilitated linkages between SHGs and various stakeholders like NABARD, PRIs and district administrative officials. Now the SHGs work on Community Based Disaster Preparedness; combining disaster relief with new livelihood options like production of life jackets.


SHGs and PRIs extend post disaster support (From Subrata Sarkar, Gramin Vikas Trust, West Bengal)

In collaboration with local PRIs and Government Departments, an INGO working in West Bengal initiated integration of DRR framework in SHG efforts and then replicated it to flood prone districts. SHGs are now extending support to PRIs in relief team towards evacuation, rescue, Joint Need Assessment, organizing relief camps, distributed relief materials, organized kitchen camps, providing dry food etc.

Women SHG members become vanguard of Disaster Preparedness (From Subhashish Debnath, UNDP, Kolkata)

The women especially the SHG members became the vanguard of the programme. The families forming SHGs started keeping emergency stocks at home. SHG members raised money to pay for the fuel of the trawler during rescue operation. They raised 8000/- each year for this purpose The women and men in the community formed task forces on early warning, rescue, relief, first aid, and began receiving training. SHG members raise money to buy Halogen and ORS packs.

Preparedness activity of women SHGs (From Subhashish Debnath, UNDP, Kolkata)

As a practice, women SHG members declare the level of food stocks that they can carry during displacement due to flood. Cluster leaders coordinate with each group for in their respective villages and bear the cost of all coordination and logistics. Early warning team establishes contact with Irrigation department’s gauge station during every flood season. The task forces conduct mock drill every year as a part of preparation. The women groups have an easy access to administration. In the process, they are still able to participate in their local development processes from which they were long excluded due to their gender identity.


Panchayat has transformed its role From hesitation to acceptance to partner (From Subhashish Debnath, UNDP, Kolkata)

The Panchayat has provided once, a small fund of Rs. 12000/- for facilitating the search & rescue training process. The Panchayat forwarded to Panchayat Samities all the approved DM plans for approval of necessary funds. Every year the Panchayat now holds elaborate discussions with SHGs on the eve of flood season on the state of preparedness. Every year the Panchayat holds a special meeting with boatmen about their readiness to assist in rescue. The Panchayat has taken up with Block Medical Officers (BMOH) the matter of pre-positioning of halogen and ORS stocks with the SHGs, as a result of which the BMOH distributes the stock to SHG women as a part of preparedness.

Proactive role of State government departments in engaging with SHGs for Disaster Preparedness (From Subhashish Debnath, UNDP, Kolkata)

The Block Medical Officer of Health (BMOH) has made it a practice to hold a preparatory meeting every year with the SHGs and Panchayats together. The line departments are providing a number of sensitisation and trainings on tube-well repair, ORS use, halogen use, first aid, vaccination, sanitation aspects, etc. The administration listens to the voice of the community during their annual contingency plans; it has become a practice to invite the Cluster leaders to the meeting. The NGOs are now invited to the meetings at the district to discuss contingency plans of the district. The administration has called upon the CBDP teams to sensitize all the Panchayats and Panchayat Samiti office bearers of nine blocks in Nadia and eight blocks in Murshidabad 

SHG women became active in Gram Sansad meetings (from Rudra Prasanna Rath, UNICEF-SIH&FW, Odisha)

As a result of the CBDP work, the community especially the SHG women became active in Gram Sansad meetings. While they were only vaguely aware of the Gram Sansad process earlier, now they form the majority in the meetings. While attendance in Gram Sansad meetings earlier was barely sufficient, now it has gone up to 50-60%. Moreover, the women attend the meetings fully prepared with their own agenda to discuss and those are not limited to CBDP issues only. The Panchayat now shares budgets, expenditures, government programmes and various quotas for the poor with the women SHG members.


Legal engagement with PRI for Project Implementation (From Shyamal Santra, Ranchi, Jharkhand)
‘Child and Women Friendly Community’ (CWFC) initiative in West Bengal (2008-2009).The uniqueness of this initiative was legal engagement with PRIs under which the NGO and local Panchayat signed a ‘Social Contract’ on non-judiciary stamp paper containing the modalities of engagement. Both the institute agreed to share their resources. Panchayat was agreed to share administrative cost of the project and office space was allocated to the NGO within the Panchayat Building and the local NGO staff was put under the direct supervision of the Panchayat.
Gujarat

SHGs and Community based disaster management support to PRIs (From Subrata Sarkar, Gramin Vikas Trust, West Bengal)

In Kutch (Bhuj and Saurastra) after the 2001 Earthquake, the existing SHGs were involved for successful implementation of Community Based Disaster Management. SHGs significantly contributed in conducting a series of awareness programs, sensitization programs, training, initiation of need based livelihood programs by forming Disaster Management Teams and developing Village Level Disaster Management Committees which had proportionate representations from PRIs and Govt. line department.

Tamil Nadu
SHGs address post-disaster domestic violence (From Ranjani K.  Murthy, Gender Consultant, Chennai)

After the Tsunami in Tamil Nadu, there was rampant alcohol abuse by men leading to increasing domestic violence. ASHAA (SHG) from a village in Nagapattinam worked closely with the local government to close liquor business in the area; spread awareness; offer support and address the issue of increasing domestic violence. Read more


SHGs support in creating detailed micro-level vulnerability mapping (From Annie George, BEDROC, Nagapattinam)

SHGs have been actively involved in understanding the micro-level vulnerabilities of the village, and the other vulnerabilities. With their intimate knowledge of the village and the villagers, mark houses which have elders, physically or mentally challenged dependents, socio-economically weak and marginalised etc. enriches the vulnerability map giving precise information on HHs requiring priority external support in the aftermath of a disaster. This knowledge is then carried forward for enhancing the resilience of the most vulnerable identified. The SHGs support in ensuring that the Social Security mechanisms in place, like the old age pension, disability pension, widow pension etc. are accessed by the identified vulnerable population.


Bihar

SHGs help mainstream DRR in local planning (from Anjan Bag, Caritas India, Bihar)

In streamlining livelihood promotion in 6 flood prone districts of North Bihar, Caritas has worked with SHGs who have hence been instrumental in developing Micro Plans of all nonfarm based livelihoods by integrating Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) measures. SHGs have been actively participating in Gram Sabha to mainstream climate change adaptation and DRR in the Gram Panchayat planning process. To read more, click here http://pfrbihar.blogspot.in.

SHGs create pressure on GPs to become more pro-active (from Jitendra Kumar, Navjagriti, Saran)

Saran district of Bihar witnesses frequent flood and water logging problems. Jal Jamaou Virodhi Sangarsh Samiti (JJVSS), an advocacy group (since 1990s) has been making efforts towards issues effective water logging management systems consisting of participatory planning, implementation and evaluation. Their support has helped 16 SHGs to amplify voices of community members and building pressure on Panchayat Representatives and government officials to integrate disaster management work and on-going government schemes/programs. 



Related Resources



Recommended Documentation


Demonstrating Community Capacity to Program and Manage Community Disaster Resilience Fund (CDRF) In India Submitted To National Alliance For Disaster Risk Reduction (From Pradeep Mohapatra, Udyama, Bhubaneshwar)

Report; Udyama

Available at: http://www.preventionweb.net/files/13473_13473EOPReport1.pdf (PDF: 7.47MB)

Is an end of pilot project report implemented in summarizing the effort of Udyama alongwith its partner organizations to carry to carry out this resilience process at community.
Suna Bhauni (from Rudra Prasanna Rath, UNICEF-SIH&FW, Odisha)

Quarterly News Bulletin issued by Department of Health & Family Welfare in association with Women and Child Development Department, Govt. of Odisha


The bulletin is for knowledge building, discussion and information dissemination. The idea is to enlighten women community members regarding their RCH rights and different schemes available for them.

Status of MicroFinance in India (2011-12) (from Navin Anand, UNDP, India)

Report; NABARD

Available at: http://www.nabard.org/departments/pdf/Status%20of%20Microfinance%202011-12%20full%20book2.pdf

The report attempts to update statistical data relating to the sector's growth and upscaling across models. It is intended to highlight and present perspectives on current issues and to document new interest, new investments and innovations in the sector. It also identifies knowledge gaps that require further research and statistical efforts.
Recommended Organizations and Programmes


Swayam Shikshan Prayog (SSP), Mumbai (from P. Chandran, SSP, Mumbai)

101, 1st Floor, 76 Baptista House, Gaothan Lane No 1, S.V. Road, Andheri West, Mumbai 400 058; Ph/Fax: +91 22-26211476; Email: sspindia1@gmail.com; Website: www.sspindia.org



Works with grassroots women self-help groups across India to promote community resilience.
Orissa Disaster management Authority (OSDMA) (From Rudra Prasanna Rath, UNICEF-SIH&FW, Orissa)

Rajiv Bhawan, Unit -5 Bhubaneswar, Odisha – 751001, India; Phone : 0674-2395398/ 2395379

Fax: 0674- 2391871; Email: osdma@osdma.org; Website: http://www.osdma.org/

The Authority has the mandate not only to take up the mitigation activities but also the relief, restoration, reconstruction and other measures including preparedness activities.

National Disaster Management Authority, New Delhi (from Tanushree Verma, Consultant, National Disaster Management Authority, New Delhi)

NDMA Bhawan,A-1, Safdarjung Enclave, New Delhi; Tele: +91-11-26701700; Control Room +91-11-26701728; Fax: +91-11-26701729; E-mail: website@ndma.gov.in ;

Website: http://ndma.gov.in/ndma/index.htm


Aims to build a safer and disaster resilient India by developing a holistic, pro-active, multi-disaster and technology-driven strategy for disaster management through collective efforts of all Government Agencies and NGOs
District Rural Development Authority (DRDA), (from Arabinda Chaudhury, Education Department, Khowai District, Tripura)

Ms Preeti Nath, Dir. (DRDA); 4th floor, State Emporia Complex, BKS Marg, New Delhi ; Ph.No.23743278, Email: Pnath@rnic.in; About DRDA http://rural.nic.in/sites/downloads/right-information-act/10DRDA(F).pdf



The objective of the scheme is to strengthen and professionalize the DRDAs so that

they can effectively enhance the quality of implementation.
Sreema Mahila Samity (from Abha Mishra, UNDP, India)

Duttapulia, Nadia, West Bengal-741504, India; Phone: 91-3473-265-207/265-385/264-151;

Email: sreema@vsnl.net; www: http://sreema.org/

Uses microfinance as an appropriate tool to empower people with very low purchasing capacity.
Calcutta Society for Professional Action in Development (SPADE) (from Subhasish Debnath, UNDP West Bengal)

52, Garfa Main Road, Kolkata- 700075; Telephone: 033-24185452/033-24186171; Fax :033-24185452; E-mail: spadekolkata@gmail.com; Website: http://www.spadeindia.net http://spadeindia.org/


Sarista Foundation (from Nagar M. Verma, Sarista Foundation, Mumbai)

Flat No 3, Pankaj Co-op Housing Society, Sitaram Keer Marg, Bhandar Lane, Mahim (West)

Mumbai - 400 016, Maharashtra, India; Telephone: 91-22-24366370, 91-22-24370138; Email: saritsa@vsnl.net; Website: http://www.saritsafoundation.org/currentevents.htm


Aims to build capacity, train, encourage, inspire, and motivate the people to use local resources, share experiences to enhance skills amongst school children, youth, women groups, disabled and vulnerable people at individual and community levels to minimize risks from disasters.



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