The Queensland History Teachers’ Association presents a professional Development Day for Primary and Lower Secondary School Teachers



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The Queensland History Teachers’ Association

presents
A Professional Development Day

for

Primary and Lower Secondary School Teachers

Exploring History through SOSE and Humanities in Primary and Lower Secondary Classrooms
at
The Queensland State Library

South Brisbane

on
Monday 7th December 2009

QHTA

Exploring History through SOSE and Humanities in Primary and Lower Secondary Classrooms

Monday 7th December 2009 Queensland State Library

8:15

Coffee and Registration

8:45

General Matters

9:00

Dr Brian Hoepper

I wish that for just one time



you could stand inside my shoes”(Dylan 1965)

10:00

Morning Tea


10:30

Workshop 1




1A Sharron Derlagen and Ian Gray (P)

History inquiry in the primary classroom - A Year 6 project investigating our most significant Australians

1B Gary Butner (P)

Pre-contact Brisbane – an inquiry unit for upper primary classes


1C Simon Farley (P)

Libraries are not just about books – using collections and historical records from the State Library

1D Terry Gallagher (S)

Introduction to the Year 10 Guidelines - History learning area

1E Sue Burvill-Shaw (S)

Get Them Thinking! Strategies to develop quality thinking in the Middle Years History class room.

1F Michelle Brown (S)

The Seizures of Youth- A Year 9 unit



11:35

Workshop 2




2A Dr Olivia Clarke (P)

Bring your history teaching to life with free digital resources from The Learning Federation.(primary focus)


2 B Eric Frangenheim (P)

An active classroom – getting students involved and inspired(primary school focus)

2C Jo Forsythe, Qld Museum (P&S)

Bring Learning To Life


2D Katherine Scott (P&S)

Pompeii: A Source-based Study Promoting the Acquisition of Historical Skills - A Workshop for Upper Primary/ Lower Middle School Students

2E Sharee Verdon (S)

Unforgettable

2F Roslyn Locke (S)

Australia and the World - The War on Terror

Exploring History in the Middle School

12:45

LUNCH


1:30

Workshop 3




3A Terry Gallagher and Peter Grainger (P)

Assessing history in the primary school 

3B Karen Madden (P)

History is all around us: an approach to studying the history of the local community.

3C Museum Experience (P&S)

Joint presentation by several museums to show teachers how to engage students in practical activities.


3D Troy Wheeler (S)

Developing History Skills in the Middle School


3E Dr Olivia Clarke (S)

Bring your history teaching to life with free digital resources from The Learning Federation.(lower secondary focus)


3F Quick and Practical (S)

A series of short presentations by experienced teachers to provide you with practical ideas to implement in the lower secondary classroom

2:35

Workshop 4



4A Simon Farley (P)

Libraries are not just about books – using collections and historical records from the State Library

4B Gary Butner (P)

Pre-contact Brisbane – an inquiry unit for upper primary classes


4C David Arnold (P&S)

Investigating history mysteries in the primary and/or lower secondary classroom

4D Naomi Barnes (S)

Going Deeper

4E Sharee Verdon (S)

Building Student-Centred Communities of Inquiry


4F Eric Frangenheim (S)

An active classroom – getting students involved and inspired(lower secondary school focus)

3:40

Wine and Cheese

Opening Session
Dr Brian Hoepper

I wish that for just one time


you could stand inside my shoes” (Dylan 1965)

Brian is well known to many members of QHTA and the world of history teaching. His workshops are eagerly sought after and always rewarding. Rather than provide a typical keynote address, Brian is going to provide a practical session from which all teachers will benefit, whether primary or secondary, and which draws on some of the requirements of the National History Curriculum.

In Positively 4th Street, Bob Dylan expressed the belief that empathy can produce deep understanding. It’s a common sentiment. ‘Empathy’ is also encouraged in the National History Curriculum currently under construction. It’s one of the ‘historical understandings’ that frame the curriculum conceptually. But it’s easier said than done. British researcher Deborah Cunningham notes that ‘the history teacher who does not regularly think about it, plan for it and teach it would be hard to find’ but then warns that ‘the criticisms levelled at empathy-type tasks have sometimes been well-founded’. In this presentation, Brian will propose strategies for encouraging historical empathy by students while avoiding the pitfalls signalled by Cunningham and others.


Workshop Session 1
1A Sharron Derlagen and Ian Gray, Somerville House

History inquiry in the primary classroom - a Year 6 project investigating our most significant Australians
ACARA’s Shape of the Australian Curriculum: History refers to the need to emphasise Historical knowledge and understanding derived from students judging historical significance. It also refers to the need to “… embed digital technologies so that they are not seen as optional tools.” Sharron and Ian will explain how Year 6 students learnt to use an historical research process by first examining values around the term ‘significance’. Workshop participants will view video and digital learning objects used in a classroom where all students have a laptop computer and used a variety of computer technologies including, learning objects, electronic timelines, movie editing, Paintshop and the web. The unit, Australian focused, as required by the emerging national History syllabus, culminated in role-playing involving active participation with a parent audience.
1B Gary Butner, Educational Consultant

Pre-contact Brisbane – an inquiry unit for upper primary classes

Gary’s workshop will focus on the investigation of indigenous history within a primary classroom, with special emphasis on the skills of historical inquiry. Indigenous history is a key component of the framing paper for the National History Curriculum and this workshop will provide practical ideas and different activities to help students develop a better understanding of indigenous history. The focus will be on pre-contact Brisbane. What can we learn from pre-contact Brisbane? This is a workshop which explores, as far as we can piece together from the historical record, the lives of the Turrbal people. A unit of study for upper Primary levels will be introduced and used to generate critical dialogue. The unit is designed to be used within SOSE but drawing significantly from the discipline of History.


1C Simon Farley, Acting Manager, Information Services, Heritage Collections, State Library

Libraries are not just about books – using collections and historical records from the State Library
The National History Curriculum framing papers have emphasised the importance of introducing students to primary sources. In this workshop, Simon will provide teachers with ways of using primary sources by showcasing the resources of the State Library, such as the historical materials in the John Oxley Library, to enhance their classroom activities in history. He will provide teachers with ways of utilising the Library’s heritage collection through the Library’s school workshops and other activities.
1D Terry Gallagher, Teaching and Learning Divsion, QSA

Introduction to the Year 10 Guidelines - History learning area
This workshop will investigate the History learning area in the Year 10 Guidelines. Participants will look at the changes and continuities needed for a Year 10 History program. The Australian curriculum for K-10 History will also be discussed.
1E Sue Burvill-Shaw, St Aidan’s Anglican Girls’ School

Get Them Thinking! Strategies to develop quality order thinking in the Middle Years History class room.

This workshop will share a number of classroom-tested strategies to encourage the development of critical, creative and strategic thinking in students of History. The strategies can be adapted to a range of topics and age levels, and meet the imperatives of the Australian curriculum to “provide teachers with opportunities to deeply engage students by ensuring that the curriculum content is presented in ways that challenge student knowledge and understanding through contexts that are meaningful and relevant to them. Students in this age range increasingly look for and value learning that is perceived as relevant, is consistent with personal goals, and/or leads to important outcomes.” (ACARA, 2009)

1F Michelle Brown, Albany Creek State High School

The Seizures of Youth- A Year 9 unit
Michelle will take participants through a Year 9 unit of work designed to address the question - Why were the Sixties so important? While the unit was initially designed to address the essential elements of QCAR, it also can be easily adapted to meet a variety of curriculum requirements, such as the National History Curriculum. This unit was written to develop historical literacies within students and within teachers who may not have a history background and focuses on students’ research skills, culminating in a multi-modal assignment.
Workshop Session 2
2A Olivia Clarke, The Learning Federation, Curriculum Corporation, Melbourne

Bring your history teaching to life with free digital resources from The Learning Federation.
Teachers around Australia are relishing the access to the amazing range of resources made freely available by The Learning Federation to support the teaching and learning of history. In this session you will learn not only about the range of historic photos, maps, documentary and feature film footage, audio and interactive learning objects available, but also about the range of ways teachers are enhancing their history teaching practice with these easily available resources. This session will focus on primary classes.
2B Eric Frangenheim Rodin Educational Consultancy

An active classroom – getting primary school students involved and inspired

Eric has a long history of developing exciting thinking strategies for the classroom. In this workshop he will take participants through a range of strategies to use with historical inquiry. These include assisting teachers: to ask explicit Higher Order questions, to select the correct cognitive thinking tool, to use the Bloom’s framework to be in control of their teaching, to teach less and get their students to work more, and to assess and report accurately.

2C Jo Forsythe, Loans Manager, Queensland Museum

Bring Learning To Life
The Shape of the Australian Curriculum: History emphasises the importance of using a variety of different sources and of introducing learners to primary and secondary source material. Museum artefacts provide real and tangible evidence about people and events in the past. The handling and investigation of material evidence is by its nature activity-based and can have a strong motivating influence in the teaching and learning of history.
This session will focus on the use of object-based investigation to:


  • stimulate an interest in and understanding of history and appreciation of difference and diversity

  • support the development of analytical skills and enquiry methods necessary to make informed decisions about human actions and decisions

  • provide an opportunity to connect historical enquiry with other curriculum areas and local area contexts.   


2D David Arnold, National Museum of Australia

Investigating history mysteries in the primary and/or lower secondary classroom
David is Manager of Education at the National Museum of Australia and has worked for many years with teacher organisations and with Ryebuck Media to produce teaching resources for Australian schools. Prior to joining the Museum he worked at Parliament House for over ten years and he taught in three secondary schools in Victoria in the 1980s.

"Ned Kelly, female convict factories, frontier conflict, the Eureka Stockade and 'who discovered Australia?' are all interesting and rewarding Australian history topics to teach and will be important in the new National History Curriculum. But how do you introduce these topics successfully in the primary and/or lower secondary classroom and what kind of inquiry learning strategies can be employed? In this workshop teachers will be invited to sample effective teaching and learning strategies from the National Museum's Australian History Mysteries series. Participants will be given several activities that they can take back to their classrooms.

2E Sharee Verdon Moreton Bay College

UNFORGETTABLE: The Past through the Emotional Lives of Australians – a research project from the 2008 History Summer School (This is a much requested repeat of the workshop Sharee gave at the National Conference in 2008)
What is an Australian? What is it to be Australian? Is Australia a land of Australians or a land of immigrants? Who or what are the real Australians in the 21st century and beyond? Where and when does this notion of “Australia” exist?

“Unforgettable” will be an introduction to and an investigation into Australian history through ordinary and diverse lives that are representative of different periods, time, place and space. These lives will be studied through personal emotions, qualities and responses to experiences rather than through skin colour, provenance, belief and so on. Through the story of the lives of ‘ordinary’ individuals in Australian History, and in particular by responding to one particular historical artefact associated with an individual, students will be motivated to develop numerous understandings and meet diverse outcomes – including knowledge, communication skills, empathy for others and identification of values and emotions – both helpful and unhelpful in living well. They will be enabled to make a difference and give a voice to previously silenced lives or perspectives in our national history. They will be encouraged to consider the wider social, political and/ or cultural issues underpinning the case study in question. Collectively, students will be exposed to a comprehensive history of Australia. The products and activities employed through this unit will cater for multiple intelligences and differing learning styles and capacities.

2F Roslyn Locke, Albany Creek State High School

Issues for the Modern World – The “War” on Terror – a History inquiry unit for Year 10
This unit encourages students to inquire into the impact of 9/11 on the modern world and explore the view of terrorism and terrorists as the new ‘evil’ in Western Society. Students explore the roots of terrorism and the way terrorism and terrorists are represented and the conflict inherent in the concept that “one person’s terrorist is another person’s freedom fighter”. Roslyn will share the approaches she uses and the resources available to encourage students to engage with the topic in a responsible and, hopefully, unbiased way.
Workshop Session 3
3A Peter Grainger and Terry Gallagher, Teaching and Learning Divsion, QSA

Assessing history in the primary school 
This session will be a practical introduction to teaching, learning and assessing history in  primary  school contexts. The session will make links between the QLD curriculum and the National Curriulum and participants will be invited to explore the assessment resources in the QSA Assessment Bank.
3B Katherine Scott, Emmaus College

Pompeii: A Source-based Study Promoting the Acquisition of Historical Skills in a SOSE environment: A Workshop for Upper Primary/ Lower Middle School Students

The National History Curriculum framing papers emphasise the importance of an inquiry based approach to history, with emphasis on investigating sources. This workshop is designed for Years 6 and 7 students and will lead participants through a source-based historical inquiry. There is a focus upon classroom approaches intending to teach students the skills of classifying sources and analysing and evaluating historical evidence. The opportunity to integrate this unit with other discipline areas will be explored by establishing links with learning outcomes and essential learnings from English and Science.

3C Museum Experiences

Planning a field trip for your students to investigate Brisbane and Queensland history? The Framing Papers for the National History Curriculum encourage teachers to use the resources of museums to implement an effective and meaningful history course. Representatives of four Brisbane museums will give a short round-up of what students can see and do during a visit to the city - all museums are within walking distance of each other. The Queensland Maritime Museum, the MacArthur Museum, Brisbane, the Queensland Police Museum and the Museum of Brisbane all offer valuable learning experiences for primary and secondary students.

3D Troy Wheeler, Albany Creek State High School

Exploring inquiry skills in a history curriculum
This workshop will explore the skills Middle School students need to investigate history and to prepare for more advanced studies in the senior years of schooling. Troy will provide practical advice for the classroom and share resources that can be adapted to a wide range of units. Skills covered involve research, annotated bibliographies, referencing and interacting with the various aspects of inquiry. There will be an emphasis on Year 10 as a transition into the senior school but there will be history ideas for all levels of middle schooling.
3E Olivia Clarke, The Learning Federation, Curriculum Corporation, Melbourne

Bring your history teaching to life with free digital resources from The Learning Federation.

Teachers around Australia are relishing the access to the amazing range of resources made freely available by The Learning Federation to support the teaching and learning of history. In this session you will learn not only about the range of historic photos, maps, documentary and feature film footage, audio and interactive learning objects available, but also about the range of ways teachers are enhancing their history teaching practice with these easily available resources. This session will focus on primary classes.

3F Quick and Practical

Strategies, Ideas and Activities for the History classroom
This workshop will feature 8 teachers presenting a 7 minute segment each on classroom strategies, ideas and activities which have worked successfully in the history classroom. Some of the teachers presenting will be Chris Price, BGS, Julie Hennessey, BGGS, Kira Sampson, Somerville House, Gary Butner, Educational Consultant, Sue Burvill-Shaw, St Aidan’s and Naomi Barnes, St Aidan’s.
Workshop Session 4
4A This is a repeat of 1C

Simon Farley, Acting Manager, Information Services, Heritage Collections, State Library

Libraries are not just about books – using collections and historical records from the State Library
The National History Curriculum framing papers have emphasised the importance of introducing students to primary sources. In this workshop, Simon will provide teachers with ways of using primary sources by showcasing the resources of the State Library, such as the historical materials in the John Oxley Library, to enhance their classroom activities in history. He will provide teachers with ways of utilising the Library’s heritage collection through the Library’s school workshops and other activities.
4B This is a repeat of 1B

Gary Butner, Educational Consultant

Pre-contact Brisbane – an inquiry unit for upper primary classes

Gary’s workshop will focus on the investigation of indigenous history within a primary classroom, with special emphasis on the skills of historical inquiry. Indigenous history is a key component of the framing paper for the National History Curriculum and this workshop will provide practical ideas and different activities to help students develop a better understanding of indigenous history. The focus will be on pre-contact Brisbane. What can we learn from pre-contact Brisbane? This is a workshop which explores, as far as we can piece together from the historical record, the lives of the Turrbal people. A unit of study for upper Primary levels will be introduced and used to generate critical dialogue. The unit is designed to be used within SOSE but drawing significantly from the discipline of History.


4C Eric Frangenheim Rodin Educational Consultancy

An active classroom – getting lower secondary school students involved and inspired
Eric has a long history of developing exciting thinking strategies for the classroom. In this workshop he will take participants through a range of strategies to use with historical inquiry. These include assisting teachers: to ask explicit Higher Order questions, to select the correct cognitive thinking tool, to use the Bloom’s framework to be in control of their teaching, to teach less and get their students to work more, and to assess and report accurately.
4D Naomi Barnes, St Aidan’s Anglican Girls' School.

Going Deeper
Strategies to develop reflective skills in the Middle Years History class room

The philosophy behind this workshop is based on Tactical Teaching – “knowing how to draw learning from teaching activities in a way that ... supports and challenges students” (Steps Professional Development, 2007). This workshop will share a number of classroom-tested strategies to encourage student reflective learning.  The strategies can be adapted to a range of topics and age levels. Strategies will be appropriate for a range of learning styles and are organised according to key elements of Bloom et al revised Taxonomy.



4E Sharee Verdon, Moreton Bay College

Building Student-Centred Communities of Inquiry

Community of Inquiry sessions are a fun and engaging way for students to openly discuss and form their points of view with their peers and teacher on historical themes and events. It is a way of delivering curriculum that integrates a range of strategies in guiding students in learning how to think through authentic work. Complex thinking is thinking which pays attention to both the substance and its procedures as it moves along. Such thinking often leads to both individual and group action which is then followed by reflection, analysis, planning and further action. The community of inquiry is designed to develop young people's ability to think for themselves, and to develop the forms of regard and practices of intellectual exchange that help to sustain an open society.
4F Karen Madden, St Aidan’s Anglican Girls’ School

History is all around us: an approach to studying the history of the local community.
The Framework Papers for the National History Curriculum have suggested that local communities should play a significant role in the development of history courses for primary schools. This workshop will introduce a local history unit designed for Middle Primary students. A rich task framework has been adopted to emphasise the use of primary evidence in inquiry studies. Basic historical skills from the unit, including building hypotheses, framing questions, gathering evidence, and analysing and evaluating evidence will be shared with participants.



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